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I am going into my second year of sailing and have worked on my sloop for two winters now. She sails great but I have had to do work inside and out. My big question is do you put your projects away till next winter, because I can't work in my slip when I can be sailing. Is this a normal problem?
 

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It depends on what your priorities are... some projects take precedence over sailing for me... but sailing trumps other projects...
 

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It depends on what your priorities are... some projects take precedence over sailing for me... but sailing trumps other projects...
That's it in a nut shell.

I haven't had a working galley stove or refrigeration since moving off the boat and into a house. We don't use the boat in a way that requires those conveniences anymore.
To me it just doesn't make sense to repair and maintain something that is not required to actually sail, just to have it sit and deteriorate due to lack of use.
You know what they say, "Use it or lose it." And it's true too. As long as we were using the stuff all the time, it was working fine. A few months of living ashore and everything started falling apart and rusting away.

We bought a little camp stove for 15 dollars and we use ice chests for the times that we stay aboard for more than a day at a time.
Same thing applies to electronics. Shoot, by the time I'm able to move back aboard and do some real cruising again, everything I could buy today will be obsolete.

But, she's got a brand new teak bowsprit, new stem fittings, the rig is in pretty good shape, the sails are fine, the ground tackle is old but sound and the engine is running good. :)

I'll be sailing! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I spent the winter getting rid of my galley! I wasn't using it so I lost it, now there is plenty of room for fishing tackle and beer. Sorry I don't know if I'll ever be a true sailer and drink RUM.
 

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Rainy days, gale-warning days, nights on the boat instead of at home, afternoons...

I am going into my second year of sailing and have worked on my sloop for two winters now. She sails great but I have had to do work inside and out. My big question is do you put your projects away till next winter, because I can't work in my slip when I can be sailing. Is this a normal problem?
I blew off work but lacked time to go out, lunch hours, an hour after we get back in....

Bits and pieces.

Yes, the rest of life seems on hold sometimes. Sometimes my job puts every thing on hold. Sometimes the family puts... You get the idea.

Sometimes it helps to list the things you will do on the hard, so that you can forget about them for a while.
 

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My big question is do you put your projects away till next winter, because I can't work in my slip when I can be sailing. Is this a normal problem?
Yup, pretty universal, I suspect. My goal is to have a safe boat in the water and not expect to get non-critical work done during the summer, given limited time available for boating. Spring and fall seasons are stressful in the north, because jobs get compressed into a tight, weather-dependant schedule. After three boats, my experience is that the first 2-3 years with a new used boat are the worst if a person buckles down to get necessary maintenance/refit done, then it gets easier to think less about the boat and more about other stuff in life.
 

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This years project was to refinish the mast and boom IT went into overtime and will be at least one more week :eek:


So the dirty white paint inside will wait another year BUT the wiring will NOT ;)
 

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I am going into my second year of sailing and have worked on my sloop for two winters now. She sails great but I have had to do work inside and out. My big question is do you put your projects away till next winter, because I can't work in my slip when I can be sailing. Is this a normal problem?
Hey Lap,
It's a mindset/attitude/preference thing , I guess. I loved working on the boat and improving things. Then I would eagerly go out sailing and try out my new methods or improvements. When I finally sold the boat 3 years ago I had everything just the way I wanted.

But that's me. Maybe you're not that way. And that's life. Find the way that brings you the most enjoyment and do it that way.
 

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I'm getting tired of climbing the 12' ladder to get aboard. I was doing pretty good with winter projects till the REAL cold hit in January. I got back to it in February but I am getting tired of the work.
'All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy'

So I'm waiting for weather to get the must do's finished. 3 Seacocks and some blister repair. Then in the water she goes and I can mix other projects with sailing over the summer.

I think the trick is to have different projects for different times of the year. Some small some bigger. Get a few of the smaller projects done to be able to see some actual acomplishments.

I've kept my original To Do list and marvel at the number of things that have been crossed off. We're gettin there!
 

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I'm new to this bought-a-new-used-boat thing, but have had a blast starting with smaller projects, then working up. Now the priority is to have a safe boat to sail for our 3 short summer months in the PNW. And I'm getting tired, too. So I might put off the bottom work until November-if I don't enjoy some sailing over the summer when I can, I just might burn out on the whole thing-don't want that!
 

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Sail when you can and work on the boat when you can. Messing around on a boat is better than just about anything else any way. The work you are doing is really enhancing the sailing so you gotta balance the 2 except when the work is for safety. When the work is getting me and I expect it gets everyone, I look at the value of the outcome vs the pleasure of the sail. The sail usually wins.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I would never take out my boat if thought it was not safe. Well never say never I do push somethings to the limit, but thats not the case here. The work I still need to do is mostly cosmetic. It's kind of a cath 22 when I am working I feel I should be sailing and when I'm sailing then I feel guilty that I am not working. Guess I enjoy knowing other people have the same problem.
 

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If you get too sick of working on your boat, call me I'll come pick it up and give it back when the projects are done. It might take me about 5 years or so but I'll work as fast as I can. Of course, I'll have to take it out for a test sail as often as need be to make sure that I'm doing the work right. Oh yeah, I work cheap. only a few bottles of rum. (a week)

Dave
 

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I've got to add my $0.02. I bought my boat last June and have been working on her (improving) ever since. Yes, I also feel the need to sail instead of work, and I am almost there.

Since last June I have added the following safety items: two new bilge pumps (primary and dewatering) with switches, hoses and wiring, MOB pole/flag, lazy jacks, all new running rigging, a forward hatch, re-ran all lines to cockpit, high water alarm, LED lighting throughout, telltales on sails, Garmin 545 GPS, and a ditch bag.

Non-safety items are: new head, insulation around cooler, port side flag (radar reflector) halyard, bow roller, Xantrex 40amp batt charger, new VHF radio, new stereo, rope clutches, deck organizers, BBQ, carpeting, water pump impeller and return line bypass, new bottom paint, new SS hand rails on cabin top, etc. etc., you get the idea.

Yes, I love working on her, but I am going to sail this summer and only fix what breaks (yeah, right).

Good luck, Bill
 

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A number of years ago, I was looking for a used 21-24ft sailboat on a limited budget. At one yard, one of the owners, who professionally restores boats to like new conditions (also builds new boats) told me that I should not buy any boat that I couldn't go sailing with immediately (and he knew that I couldn't even think about buying one of his refurished boats on the permitted budget). He said that a project boat, that wasn't sailable would use up my money, and my limited time and eventually get to be a bothersome unending chore, since I couldn't achieve my purpose of actually going sailing. He said even a sailable boat, that had big unfinished projects that needed to be undertaken, would bug me and take away the satisfaction of even that level of sailing because the undone projects would always be hanging over my head.

All of us are different....some get more joy out of fixing up things than in actually using them...for those the above wouldn't apply. But for lots of us, especially including me, he had a valid point. It's something worth thinking about really well before undertaking a project boat. My observation is that there are sailable boats available for about the same price one pays for a project boat when the cost and time spent on upgrading it to sailable condition are added into the mix.
 

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I sail when I want, and work on her when I want.... and sometimes I go down to the boat, pick up a book, lie down on a bunk and in no time at all I'm pushing the z's. She is my 'place' to escape to, she's my hobby, she's my pleasure.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I agree with mawm and working on the boat has helped me learn the inside and outs about boats and sailboats. Like I said I am new to sailing but construction is no problem because I am a contractor ( even figured out how to sew all new cushions). Right now I can't afford to buy a new boat, even if I could I wouldn't know what I wan't. Is it hard to sell a boat that you put alot of work into? This is my first boat and I am getting pretty attached and I don't like attachment, much less to something material.
 

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I sail when I want, and work on her when I want.... and sometimes I go down to the boat, pick up a book, lie down on a bunk and in no time at all I'm pushing the z's. She is my 'place' to escape to, she's my hobby, she's my pleasure.
Well said Mawn! This, to me, is what owning a sailboat is all about.

Even during the (all too short) summer season in Michigan, I still do some projects when I am at the boat but not able to sail because of time limitations, crew availability, uncooperative wind/weather, etc. Some get done, some don't. I doubt the project list will ever end, so enjoy it when you can. Owning a sailboat is a lifestyle for many of us, which includes the repair/upgrades, relaxing, as well as the sailing.
 
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