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Discussion Starter #1
Hello
I have a Hunter 326 (2002). I have bought new batteries as the original batteries finally died. They would not hold a charge. I have a slip and AC power.

My question, with the 2 new interstate SRM27 (Type 27) batteries I bought, how should I charge them? I have on the AC side of the nav station, a charging selector.

Should I keep the charging/inverter selector enabled whenever I am in the slip (even on the weekdays I am not there)?

Or only flip the charging/inverter selector to on when I am in port. I do understand that whatever I do, I need to check the water levels of the wet cells.

Everything, except the microwave and water heater lives on the DC side of my nav station power controls. So the bilge, lights etc all use DC.

I would think, but I am not certain, that keeping the AC inverter/charger on would allow a trickle charge to keep my batteries topped off so when I go out for the day or sleep over somewhere on anchor I will have full batteries...?

Does this sound like a viable idea or a bad idea...

Ian
 

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Ian,

First, pwning a boat, I strongly suggest you read Nigel Claders Boatowners Guide to Mechanical and Electrical Sytems (I think that is the name). Top notch book, and very detailed. It belongs on every boat that has any systems at all.

To answer your question, you should always leave the charger on. It will keep your batts charged. Get rid of those wets and put in some more wets (if you are a weekender) or agms (if you are more serious).

- CD
 

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Ian...the first thing you need to do is to find out what is connected to that charger/inverter swi
tch! Assuming it is a modern 3 stage charger, you should leave it on all the time while at the dock. You should know how many charging amps it puts out and how to set it for different type batteries...and whether it charges BOTH batteries or just one OR how to accomplish this...(i.e. a 4 position battery choice switch.)
Assuming you will want to keep your engine start battery fully charged...a single group 27 cell is not a whole lot for any extended weekend or week long type trips, especially if you have a fridge. You may want to think about your cruising plans and weather you should expand a bit and wether the charger you have will do THAT job.
Good luck!!
 

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camaraderie said:
especially if you have a fridge.
Do you guys leave the fridge running when not on board?
This is our first season on a slip, we have always been on a mooring can.
We are away from the boat mon through fri.
I asked a dock neighbor, and he said yes, he leaves the fridge running when away from the boat.
I'm afraid of burning out the little 12v compressor.
What do others do?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I do not have a fridge (cooler type thing).

I have a 4 way GUEST switch.

I do need to crawl in behind the seat to read the label on the charger/inverter and find out what manufacture it is, so I may review what it does (specs)

The cost of the sealed batteries was what steered me away them. The wife runs the checkbook.

I do not have AC, fridge, electric windlass....

All I really have is GPS, Chartplotter, ST 60 gear, and radar. The microwave is only a shorepower thing (or diesel).

Ian
 

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sailortjk1 said:
Do you guys leave the fridge running when not on board?
This is our first season on a slip, we have always been on a mooring can.
We are away from the boat mon through fri.
I asked a dock neighbor, and he said yes, he leaves the fridge running when away from the boat.
I'm afraid of burning out the little 12v compressor.
What do others do?
Simple answer: Do you like Cold Beer ;) I leave ours on low when we leave for the week. I also bring our weekly re-stocking items to the boat in a cooler containing large plastic soda bottles full of frozen water and add those non-leaking blocks of ice to the fridge to help out the poor little compressor for the weekend :)
 

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If you have a modern marine charger, leave them on as advised above. The reason you do this is to prevent the batteries from "sulfating", I believe is the term, in other words the sulphur in the sulphuric acid sedimentizes to the bottom of the case killing the battery. Sulfated batteries can be revised - best done at a battery shop - by super charging the batteries overnight.
 

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I'm not sure I agree...

If the owner regularly uses the boat on weekends, and simply leaves it from Monday to Friday, the only reason I can see for leaving the charger on all the time is in case the boat develops a leak requiring the bilge pump--in that case having the charger on may allow the pump to operate longer than otherwise.

If he plugs in the charger for a while on arriving Friday night, it would quickly recharge any amount that the unused batteries would have lost during the week--assuming that the owner is not using any electricity during the week (he said he doesn't have a fridge, etc.).

I personally don't like leaving anything plugged in for longer than necessary, so if it were me and the boat in good condition (ie. good seacocks, hoses checked, etc.) I would not leave the charger/inverter plugged in all week for nothing.

Just my opinion....I would be happy to have someone point out any other reasons for why this might be important.

Frank
 

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You have a Adlerbarbor refrigerator, right?? I thought that came standard on a 326. That windlass would not make a difference. It would run off of 12v. ANother reason to keep your charger on is that wet cells start losing their charge the second you unplug them (whehter there is a load on them or not). Also, charging takes a while if your batteries are drained. It is not like a car. Deep cycles batts require a 3 stage charge, the final stage taking a good chunk of the time. Otherwise you will sulphate your new batts and be right back where you started (getting new batts). Unless the charger is really putting juice into them, a charger on float/trickle draws very little power.

Just leave it plugged in. It is safer too, should you spring a leak and start running your bilge a lot.

- CD
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No, I have a cooler, no fridge. Sniff.
However, it had full electronics so it wasn't a deal breaker. This is my first boat (that I own).
 

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Frank...the big reason to leave it on is the bilge pump. I guess you can take your chances on a sunken boat vs. a boat in flames but with a proper marine charer I don't think there is much risk.

TJK1...if you don't keep food in there during the week then there is no need to run it BUT...you should keep the lids off in warm weather to prevent mildew & gross stuff growing in there during the week if you leave it off.
 

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camaraderie said:
you should keep the lids off in warm weather to prevent mildew & gross stuff growing in there during the week if you leave it off.
Thats exactly what we do.
I'm thinking we will try keeping it running so we have cold Soda for the weekend and also so that we don't have to keep carrying a small cooler of cheese and eggs everythime we leave.
 

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We live five minutes from the marina, so we're there most every day. But even if we only visited on weekends, I would still keep the reefer on.

Putting the need for cold beverages, emergency bilge pumps and sulfating battery cells aside, considering that most food items like relishes, condiments and prepared sauces must be refrigerated once opened, I'd think it would be a PITA to bring this stuff down to the boat each time we wanted to stay onboard.
 

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TrueBlue said:
We live five minutes from the marina, so we're there most every day. But even if we only visited on weekends, I would still keep the reefer on.

Putting the need for cold beverages, emergency bilge pumps and sulfating battery cells aside, considering that most food items like relishes, condiments and prepared sauces must be refrigerated once opened, I'd think it would be a PITA to bring this stuff down to the boat each time we wanted to stay onboard.
Your right Blue, it is.
Im sick of the small cooler every weekend.
 

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You're gonna love having your boat at a slip. It will heighten the boating experience and enable your family to make new friends at the marina as well. Some of our closest friendships were germinated at the marina.
 

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What about me, TB! You said I was your best friend.... I am on sailnet!!

Fine. Now I know how I rank. Maybe BestFriend will be my Bestfriend. Or does Bestfreidn mean he is already someone elses Bestfriend? Or is Bestfriend his Bestfriend... hell, this is getting confusing. Bestfriend, change your name.

- CD
 

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Have you guys seen the thread where you mark yourself on a world map?
Did you see the photo of Bestfriend's boat on that thread?
You have to check it out.

I hope the original poster got his question answered.
 

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christyleigh said:
Simple answer: Do you like Cold Beer ;) I leave ours on low when we leave for the week. I also bring our weekly re-stocking items to the boat in a cooler containing large plastic soda bottles full of frozen water and add those non-leaking blocks of ice to the fridge to help out the poor little compressor for the weekend :)
If you are just weekending/overnighting, the pop bottles full of ice are a great idea. It can even be fruit juice or what have you, as long as the bottles haven't split during freezing. The fridge wants to be full of cold things as it won't have to work as hard chilling empty cubes of air. I would venture to say that if you want to be stingy with amps and you are going to only half-fill your fridge, load it up with bottled ice and then turn it completely off. Most boxes can act just as an icebox for 48 hours or so, and you can drink off the water as it thaws!
 

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lyonsian said:
Yes, I did get my question answered. Thank you all!
Have you considered a Koolatron or similar Peltier-fan-run cooler? They draw 3-4 amps, which is acceptable from a beefy 12 VDC socket, but as with my previous comment, if you want to part-load them with frozen pop in plastic bottles and then "insulate" them with a Mylar sheet or even wrapped in a sleeping bag, they will keep quite cold for 24 hours or until you next run the engine or hit a place with shore power.

I liked them because they were self-contained and I could put off retrofitting my giant '70s icebox with the crumbling urea foam...this would have meant dissembling the galley to fix...urgggh...
 
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