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How about once you get it clean, you could use the pre-mixed shelf stuff... like this:


Gets expensive if you use gallons worth at a time of course.

Ethanol free fuel helps...
Their website says it is for air cooled motors only. I called the company and a rep said he didn't know why the website says that and would not comment on that policy.
I also sent an email and did not get a response.
 

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All this advice is good. For sure, the best thing is to take the carb completely apart, soak it in cleaner removing the expendables, get a rebuild kit and replace all the expendables. Yes, and an air compressor blowing out all the passages. Yes, and replace the in line fuel filter, and check the gas tank system particularly if external for leaks and blockage in the pickup tube, etc., etc.

That said, 9 out of 10 times, taking the bowl off, making sure it is perfectly clean (a spec of something is enough to cause havoc) squirting the carb cleaner thru the jets, gets a small engine going for me relatively quickly. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
The stuff on the throttle plate won't cause problems for the carb think small passages use carb cleaner and clean everything out twice hen blood it clean with carb cleaner again reassemble and run it
My thinking is that if there is small crud like that on the throttle plate then it is likely it has made its way to the jets; so, yes, they have to come out and be cleaned along with everything else.
 

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Suggest you take anything apart that will come apart & place on a big clean towel, in order of dis-assembly, "up" side up. Reverse for assembly. The "spots" may have been caused by evaporating gas, over time. I have the same basic motor, going on three years but haven't had any problems, after draining after just about every user & using an additive.

So, have not yet became "up close & personal" with this carb, yet. :D

Paul T
 

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Your initial post states you have used ethanol in your gas. It's well known that ethanol attacks every gasket, seal, including your fuel hose, and breaks it down. A cleaning of the carburetor might help but more than likely it's going to need to go back to the shop for expensive repairs. Be sure to tell the mechanic about the ethanol. Then be sure to use only ethanol free gas, sold at most marinas. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news. Chuck
 

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I sail in the corn belt of Illinois where ethanol is 'grown' - there are no ethanol free gas sources within hours.

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That doesn't change the fact that it can ruin your outboard.There are some additives that will help but not eliminate the problem. I suspect that this is your cause for issues. This information is a little dated but it provides the basic info, http://www.nola.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2012/12/higher-ethanol_fuel_starting_t.html . Chuck
 

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That doesn't change the fact that it can ruin your outboard.There are some additives that will help but not eliminate the problem. I suspect that this is your cause for issues. This information is a little dated but it provides the basic info, Why higher-ethanol fuel will hurt anglers, and what you can do | NOLA.com . Chuck
Interesting article, no doubt it is bad stuff. I can only speak for myself. I have had to use E!0 since it came on the market, around the early 90's, I think.

Used it in cars, motorcycles, generators & outboards since then. Mixed with this:

Fuel Injector Cleaners, Diesel Injector Cleaners , Fuel Additives | Berryman Products

& draining the carburetor between uses has been problem free for me.

I change the gas in my generator once a year, the "old" gas runs fine.

Other additives may be as good or better?

Paul T
 

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Interesting article, no doubt it is bad stuff. I can only speak for myself. I have had to use E!0 since it came on the market, around the early 90's, I think.

Used it in cars, motorcycles, generators & outboards since then. Mixed with this:

Fuel Injector Cleaners, Diesel Injector Cleaners , Fuel Additives | Berryman Products

& draining the carburetor between uses has been problem free for me.

I change the gas in my generator once a year, the "old" gas runs fine.

Other additives may be as good or better?

Paul T
Actually e10 has been around and in common practical use since the mid 1970's but back then it was called gasahol and not as well regulated as it is now days
 

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Actually e10 has been around and in common practical use since the mid 1970's but back then it was called gasahol and not as well regulated as it is now days
I was thinking that, it was around the time that lead free gas was introduced.
The site I looked at said early 90's? All I can remember is it was said your mileage would go down about 10%, which mine did. Not sure, but when it first came out, I think you had a choice, for a while, of "straight" gas or gasohol?

Overall, the only bad effect I had was that rubber fuel hoses seemed to get brittle & debris formed in float bowls if fuel was allowed to evaporate.

I suppose it is just a matter of time until E15 becomes mandatory nation wide.

Paul T
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I'm the original poster from almost two years ago. After all this time, I believe I might have identified the problem and the solution. Just to recap: the problem was the engine would stall out under load. A few pulls on the cord and it would start up, but soon stall again. And so on. Rebuilding the carb had no effect. Replacing the gas had no effect. Adding stabilizers and other stuff to the gas had no effect. Replacing the carb had no effect. Last season (2015) was pretty much wasted as far as sailing; every time we headed out the motor would stall before we could escape the confines of the marina.

One afternoon I was thinking over every component of the fuel system and googling around for ideas. I found a few posts on forums here and there complaining of problems with EPA compliant tanks and caps, including fuel starvation if the tank and cap don't properly regulate the pressure to 5 psi. Hmmm. Rather than taking a drill to the cap, I obtained a 'traditional' cap with an old-fashioned screw vent and put it on the tank.

No issues since. My fingers are crossed. I would feel guilty about the vapors escaping, but more gas is spilled disconnecting the line with 5 psi than using a traditional cap.

As for the ethanol issue, a gas station near our lake just began selling real (non-ethanol) 91 octane.
 

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Good news.
For many years the remote OEM tanks for 4, 5 & 6 HP Tohatsu OBs have been a problem/PITA.

The original 'valve' in the fill cap would become stuck and would eventually lead to significant vacuum developing in the tank; thus, stopping the fuel supply.
Worse, with the tank if left for anytime in the sun would develop extreme pressure; and if the tank not manually 'depressurized' before connection the 'quick connects' would flood the carburetor.
On the full delivery hose, the so-called non-adjustable hose clamps usually allow leaks; either air leaks if the tank developed vacuum or fuel leaks if over pressurized. Plus the rubber compound used for the hosing would easily 'rot' in contact with ethanolated fuel and break off at the worst time.

The 'new and improved' version of the Tohatsu remote tank (for 4/5/6 hp) and quick connect hosing is not 'much' better, as the tank cap contains a small rubber 'valve' that reduces vacuum, but not tank pressure.
As you've found out, its best to use a manual vent valve of the tank cap; just don't always fill the tank to total capacity to prevent inadvertent spilling of the fuel.
Keep an eye for the need of rapid replacement of the rubber hose; consider to remove the faux-hoseclamps and replace with 'real' hose clamps.

:)
 
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