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Well, since the thread is already revived....

At my sailing club they do something like this on their J/24s. Split backstay, so there's a line tied around the backstay above the split. There's a spring loaded clip on the other end of this line. After the main is down, one wraps the line around the boom and clips it to itself. Before raising the main, unclip the line and slip it to one leg of the backstay. Note that this is only used to hold the boom up once the main is down, having it on when the main is up (or during the hoist/drop) means you can't ease the sail.

This works fine for us because the helm can hold the boom up during the hoist/drop, and having the boom in the cockpit isn't really a big deal. No chafe on the backstay due to rope pigtail on metal backstay. As for load on the backstay, our mooring field is incredibly rolly due to large cargo ships steaming 100 feet on one side, a depth change from 70 to 10 feet right outside the field, and a sea wall on the inside. We can't use the mainsheet to cinch down the boom on the moorings, because the forces literally rip the traveler apart. No issue with the backstay.
 

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my Columbia 26 had a short piece of wire Nico Pressed to the backstay with a hook to clip on the boom at the other end. Worked to stow the boom but useless for reefing.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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Boomkicker - you can thank me later. its cheap, works great, and provides UPlift in light air. No it won't support the boom if you throw yourself on the boom.. Which is why when you are done sailing you run the main halyard back to the end of the boom to support it.

I am no fan of a topping lift.

Yeah thread dredge, but you ran with it.
 

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Barquito
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Boomkicker - you can thank me later. its cheap, works great, and provides UPlift in light air. No it won't support the boom if you throw yourself on the boom.. Which is why when you are done sailing you run the main halyard back to the end of the boom to support it.

I am no fan of a topping lift.

Yeah thread dredge, but you ran with it.

Everything is relative, but, I wouldn't call Boomkickers cheap. I think it would be more than $300 for my boat. However, may still be worth the money, and, running a topping lift may cost just as much depending on how much gear you need to add.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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Baquito, sorry correct, I just mean boomkicker way cheaper than rigid vang. topping lift likely the cheapest.

$300 is probably on the high side for a kicker. I think I paid $200ish. But point taken.
 
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