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I am new to this forum and i have really been wanting to save up for a sailboat. I learned how to sail on a sunfish and want to take sailing lessons. Both of my parents know how to sail but we do not own a sailboat. If i convince my dad to split the price with me then we will be able to buy one. Currently i am working two jobs to help pay for the sailboat. I really have my mind set on a sailboat around 20'-27' and that has a cabin on it for weekend trips. I really like the O'day 22 and the Catalina model also. I have looked around at boat listing in my area and have found some nice sailboats under $5,000. If there are any other good boats that you have seen for sail please feel free to pm me.

anyways.........
what is the total cost (and yearly cost) for owning a sailboat around 20'-27 feet. We would need to get a dock slip to store it.

i would like to know this so my parents have an idea about how much it is total.

THANKS!!!!!!
 

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You can find some decent boats on a shoestring budget like that... you'll also get a lot of experience and knowledge about how to maintain them, because they'll probably come from the early 70s and need a lot of maintenance :) My boat, purchased a year and a half ago, is exactly the sort you're looking for. I find that on a yearly basis, moorage, maintenance, and insurance overwhelm the original cost of the boat.

Depending on where you live, for a small boat like that, your family might consider keeping the boat on a trailer on your property. A slip for a 22' boat can be over $2000/yr, and for 27' can be nearly $3000/yr. Insurance is comparatively inexpensive, so your other big cost is maintenance. If your family does all the work (and actually, two or three people is plenty to take care of a boat that size) then it can be a lot less expensive, but still: I've done all the maintenance on my boat and it's been about $1300 this year alone. Last year my total expenses were about $8K and this year we've been a bit more efficient at $4K, but I may have more projects at the end of the year.

To summarize, if you do all the labor yourself (and do it reasonably well), and you keep the boat in the water your biggest cost will probably be moorage. At least it was for me and I'm in a similar budget/boat range it would seem.
 

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The only cost you can calculate for certain are slip costs because all marinas have them posted somewhere or can quote you the cost per foot per year. The rest is entirely up to you on how much you wish to invest initially and annually for maintenance and upgardes.
Personally I spend a bit too much on mine but I get a lot out of it. My doctor cannot prescribe a drug that can do for me what an afternoon of sailing will do and as for a weekend getaway not even the illegal drug marrket can top that one.
Sailing is a passion to sailors as golf is to golfers, boating is a hole in the water to dump your money and golf is a hole in the ground to putt your money into, everyone has a pursuit that costs $$$. Even for a small sailboat your costs are going to be in the thousands per year or more depending on how many smaller toys you put on your big toy.
Buy a nice sailboat and enjoy the fruits of your labour.
 

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Cost of storage is the single biggest X-FACTOR

Around here a dock space is 5K MIN Vs a mooring with launch at 1400 dollars massive differance

Storeing a boat in a yard is also a big cost a 29' will run about 2400 dollars for winter storage NO matter how you slice the bread

I have friends that bring boats home UP to 35' and between the trucking and lifting is still cost about 2K :)

I still use a trailor and bring it home for the winter so its about 500 dollars round trip for the crane
 

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Generally taking every thing into account... the annual cost of the boat will be about 25 to 30% more than you can afford with out regard to what type boat or where it is located.

That is the thing about sailing... it IS worth it! and that is why we do it anyway.
 

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When it comes to boats, there is only one completely truthful answer whenever anyone asks a question about how much they should expect it to cost...

EVERYTHING YOU'VE GOT!!!

(And like RealityCheck said, it's worth every penny.)
 

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It can be done cheaper

As most said the cost of sailing is very dependent on the cost of mooring. If you are willing to keep it 22 feet or under and your parents have a medium sized car or SUV, you can sail for cheap by

Keeping the boat on a trailer

Keeping the boat simple

Buying the right boat the first time

By keeping the boat on a trailer you can avoid the big expenses and maintenance of paying for a slip and painting the boat each season. If the boat is light enough set up time will run around 20-30 minutes with some practice and will allow you to explore a variety of sailing areas.

If you have a few choices of boats spend a little more for one in great shape ready to go. The boat that is $1-2,000 less may have $5,000 less of equipment or future projects included, plus the time it takes to do these projects. How do I know this? I just bought a $1,000 sailboat.

Check out boats like the Catalina 22 or West Wight Potter 19 or some other boats in the 17-22' range. Also check out Frugal Yachting by Larry Brown. Good luck in your search.
 

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Where do you live? That is the biggest factor in dockage cost.

I live on Lake Erie and it is WAY cheaper than some of the others here are paying. Dockage for my 26' is under $2000/year and that includes haul out, wash-down, winter storage, and launch. Around here, most of the marinas have 10-20% or more of their slips open - a "benefit" of a down economy.

If there is any way to trailer, that will save you a lot of money. It is also much easier to do maintenance if you keep your boat at your house. In retrospect, I wish I had bought trailerable boat instead.

Around here, there are plenty of small pocket cruisers that are for sale for cheap and many more sitting in marinas, yards, and storage facilities that probably would be for sale if you ask. Someone might even give you one.

Find one that has all the hardware and sails and is in sailable condition. The smaller you go, the cheaper it will be to outfit and maintain.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
i am now looking at a catalina 25. Trailing is out of the question because we have a minivan. I would keep it on the potomac river slips range from 1500-2000 dollars depending on where you are.
 

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Learn to do maintenance, installations and upgrades yourself. Yard costs are about $80.00 an hour plus parts. Yikes!:eek:

If you're going to be doing a lot of equipment / parts purchasing for either a new or a used boat, get a part time job at West Marine. The employee discounts are incredible.

We've got a bunch of tips on our website "The Frugal Mariner" (I can't believe I've touted our website on two posts in a row. Spamalot!:rolleyes:) These tips are geared more toward cruisers, but they can apply to almost anybody with a boat. This link will take you directly to the "Cruising on a budget page.

Good luck with your new boat and have fun.
 

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It was probably a good decision to get the in water vs trailerable boat if you really want to do the most boating.

People with boats on trailers, have a strong tendency after a short time to sail less and less due to the launching hassles and typically something you can't do for a few hours sail some afternoon or any quick sail just on your own.

You will most likely spend more time on the boat by having it in a slip, even when your working on it. It is FAR more FUN to work on a boat in the water than on a trailer unless your having to work on the wet parts.

Good luck and fair winds.
 

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Catalina 25

Google the Catalina 25 and 250 International Association. We have a great site that is a resource for you. I am commodore. This is a perfect boat for you. We have many members in the Potomac area. You can buy an older one in good condition around $5K (more with a trailer). You can keep her in a seasonal slip. On top of your slip fees, you should probably plan on spending about $1000 at the time of purchase and I'd set a budget of about $1000/year for maintenance, repairs, bottom paint, and stuff.

Of course you can spend far more....
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This Sucks!

talked to my parents..... dont think we have enough time to do it so i told them that we dont have to do so much of the things i want to do on weekends. so then they said they dont want me getting a job until at least awhile through the first quarter in school so they know if i could handle a job....

I am so bummed....:( :( :( :(
 

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That's too bad... someday you'll have your own boat. In the meantime, there are plenty of much cheaper ways of getting into sailing, such as boat co-ops, which can be pretty astonishingly affordable, and chartering, which can be pretty astonishingly expensive, and sailing clubs, which I don't really know anything about. You should check what's available in your area. There's probably info about each option on this forum as well.

Good luck, and don't despair!
 

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Hey kid, try not to be too bummed.:( The time will pass quickly and before you know it, you and your folks will be looking for that boat.:)

If the 20-27 footer idea doesn't work out because of slip fees, upkeep costs, time commitments, etc., you might be able to find something that can be daysailed, quickly rigged and launched, and simply maintained that will meet at least some of your desires. The bigger boat can come later.:)

More than one way to skin a cat.:D Good luck, and stay in touch. Lots of sailing and boat buying experience here.
 

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A trailerable boat is a big savings if you have a vehicle to tow it (and the vehicle is in good repair). Towing a boat can be "interesting" and launching at a ramp has a whole different set of things to create stress. But I love my trailerable boat and she was an affordable way to get on the water. A project boat will cost you more $$ than you think. I saved money with a well loved previously owned boat. Don't forget to calculate the fuel cost if you go with a trailerable boat. There are lots of tings to add to boats but you can sail without them. Good luck on your search
 
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