SailNet Community banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,478 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am building a plywood and epoxy dinghy that is small enough to carry on the foredeck. However, in good weather I will tow it. I have found that my other dinghy (similar design), really seems to 'stick' in the the water when towed. It seems like it should jump up on a plane and tow easier, but, it just sucks into the water deeper. Do you think it would help to mount a tow eye closer to the surface of the water?
 

·
Bombay Explorer 44
Joined
·
3,619 Posts
Nope; higher will be better you want to get the nose of the dink down. A longer line seems to help too.

Having a fender across the front of it is a good idea too.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
Departing from the wisdom above, we've spent a lot of time over the years towing hard dinghies.. what's worked for us is to tow close in off the leeward quarter (with a fender perhaps for surges) This seems to minimize the shipping of water over time and keeps things well behaved. It's even worthwhile 'tacking' the dinghy from side to side on a beat.

If you do tow far aft, for a solid dinghy I'd recommend a transom plug that's left open while moving to let any spray accumulation get out of the boat. Most dinghies will float high enough not to ship water through the plug at rest (but don't forget to put the plug back in as soon as you board!!) Trying to recover a swamped dinghy on a long painter in a blow is not fun.. don't ask....

In following seas the up-close tow can be problematic, but as you say you can stow it aboard if necessary....
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,478 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I'm going to try to build a pretty light dinghy. I am just going to drill a hole through the bow and splice a poly line in. Maybe a little reinforcement in that part of the bow.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
I tow a dingy and have also built small ply and epoxy boats. Make sure your towing eye is very strong. The problem is not what is needed to pull the weight and drag of the dink, but the forces on the set up if it surges forward in a following sea and then falls back with a snap, or if it gets swamped or turtled.
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,478 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
More motivation to keep it on deck in anything but flat conditions. It will be 4mm okoume, so if it gets dragged under at 6 or 7 knots, I think it might be transformed into toothpicks regardless of painter attachment. Will definitly reinforce around the painter hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
As TQA says, tow it further aft, but on the "downhill" slope of the next wave behind the stern wave.

A plywood dinghy will tow better than an inflatable.
Soft bottom inflatable or RIb? My Avon RiB tows much easier than my Dyer Dhow (with or w/o the center board down.)

When it is rough I will usually use two painters. That makes it possible to to control exactly the position of the dink in the boats wake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Soft bottom inflatable or RIb? My Avon RiB tows much easier than my Dyer Dhow (with or w/o the center board down.)

When it is rough I will usually use two painters. That makes it possible to to control exactly the position of the dink in the boats wake.
Semi thread-hijack.

I am right now in the process of deciding whether to switch from a hard plastic dinghy to an inflatable.

This must have been discussed ad nauseum here, but I can't find a thread on pros and cons.

Interested in any thoughts folks might have, or a link to a thread if I missed it.
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,478 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Semi thread-hijack.

I am right now in the process of deciding whether to switch from a hard plastic dinghy to an inflatable.

This must have been discussed ad nauseum here, but I can't find a thread on pros and cons.

Interested in any thoughts folks might have, or a link to a thread if I missed it.
Here are a few.

When I am looking for something specific on SN (which I do a lot), I get better results by googling the search with 'site:sailnet.com' added to the search.


http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/449-dinghys-inflatable-vs-rigid.html

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/38278-rigid-vs-inflatable-rib-dinghy-international-cruising.html

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance-articles/20001-choosing-dinghy.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Towing a home built ply-epoxy dinghy, Yup, I have sad experience with that. Tried towing my 2-paw-9 nesting dinghy leaving Great Sale Cay in the Bahamas. Had about 50' of poly line out so could not see that she was filling with water. I noticed that our speed was slowing and wasn't sure why till the tow line parted when we surged on a slight swell. Yeah, we were able to retrieve her but never did find a good way to tow her. She ended up on the foredeck and even nested was too big. I gave her away in Marsh Harbor. Too bad cuz she rowed very well.
My previous hard dinghy did not tow well either and always seemed to manage to get loose. I'd have to always chase her down into weird places. It was like she wanted to escape. I finally gave her away too.
Am now trying an 8.5' porta-bote that I do not intend to tow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
I have towed my eastport 7.7 wooden sailing pram. It towed well and did not fill with water except for the thunderstorm. I may try to make a cover for it. but it was really not too bad, My long term plan for longer passages is the foredeck. I used 3/8" poly line, so it floats which is nice. The only draw back is that it was a bit noisy. the water slapping the hull of the pram even 20-30 ft back was a bit much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Semi thread-hijack.

I am right now in the process of deciding whether to switch from a hard plastic dinghy to an inflatable.

This must have been discussed ad nauseum here, but I can't find a thread on pros and cons.

Interested in any thoughts folks might have, or a link to a thread if I missed it.
I sold the Dyer. It's very "salty" but also very "tender" (maybe that's where the name came from). In rough conditions it could be unsafe. The RIB could have a pro offensive line srand on the tube and not flip. I am looking at the Portland Pudgy as I miss the sailing of the Dyer.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top