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Swab
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I hear a lot of people talking about trading up to a bigger, better, newer, faster, whatever boat. My boat is a Vega 27 by Albin Marin, built in 1973 which I have heard described as "A good first boat". I agree. its my first boat. I've owned her for nineteen years.

I know people who have been through five or six boats in that time and I have taken advantage of the opportunity to sail on many of them. Rarely have I thought that the new boat offered any significant advantage over the old one and never have I wished for a new boat of my own. I recently decided that if I suddenly had unlimited money to spend on a boat, I would take Lealea to Port Townsend and have her completely rebuilt and re-commissioned rather than buying something new.

But that's me. (And I recognize my eccentricity)

Other than because of a growing (Or shrinking) family dictating a larger boat or a change in long range plans or location like moving from the lakes to the ocean or from fishing to cruising, What reasons would you have for trading boats?
 

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While technically our 2nd boat (by 6 months) we stuck with our Viking 28 for 10 years - not bad for a smallish boat and a growing family. In the end we got into bigger boats through partnerships with friends.

When that came to an end neither party wanted to support and handle the bigger boat alone, so as per our agreement the boat was sold and we've each "downsized" recently to mid-30s footers. Budget considerations have always played a part in these decisions for us as well.

But in essence I agree with your sentiment, despite the gloss and glitter I don't find many boats at boat shows that make we want to change again.
 

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On the rare occasion that my wife and I get to sail alone (every couple years!), one of us invariably remarks that ours is a boat we we'd be happy with indefinitely. It does everything we ask of it, and it is a real joy to step aboard every time we venture out, that "pinch me" feeling is still there.

But alas, families grow, children get bigger, and holding tanks seem to shrink! So our thoughts sometimes run to twin-heads, private sleeping cabins, and inviting our kid's friends along. So we will likely end-up with a larger boat, and then the kids will fly the coop and we'll regret it!
 

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For me it was the entertainment factor / cost to repair over what it was worth. The Catalina 27 I had after the mast being pulled ripped up the deck - I had to give a long thought to what to do. After some dreamy plans of fixing it, realization came in and I determined that the biggest reason for wanting a boat was the social aspect.

The 27'er was ok for 1-3 people but the 38'e, I have room galore and no longer do I have to trip around people to entertain It never had to do with speed. I also now sail in more inclement weather as I feel the 38'er is more seaworthy mainly because of the perception one may have of the difference between driving a small car and big truck - I just feel safer overall.
 

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blue collar cruiser
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I'm still on my first boat, a 27'er. I'd love to have more room, sure, but at what expense? It doesn't seem like a good use of money unless you are making lots of it, which I'm not. For now we are both very happy with our boat, it's seaworthy and takes us everywhere we want to go.

With a family on the way I've been dreaming of DOWNSIZING to a smaller craft, one that will be easier to take out for quick afternoon daytrips and can be beached. It sure would be nice to just run the boat ashore and let the little one run around instead of anchoring and dinghying in every time or only going where there is a dock.
 

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With a family on the way I've been dreaming of DOWNSIZING to a smaller craft, one that will be easier to take out for quick afternoon daytrips and can be beached. It sure would be nice to just run the boat ashore and let the little one run around instead of anchoring and dinghying in every time or only going where there is a dock.
Two words for you: SHADE and TOILET. The two most important aspects of family sailing!:)
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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I hear a lot of people talking about trading up to a bigger, better, newer, faster, whatever boat. My boat is a Vega 27 by Albin Marin, built in 1973 which I have heard described as "A good first boat". I agree. its my first boat. I've owned her for nineteen years.
We've had a couple of boats that would have been good enough. Each bigger boat has been more fun to be on though, at least until it's time to paint the bottom.
 

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Abysmally Stupid
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We are thinking of and hope to trade up from our 30’ to something in the range of 37'-42’. There is a number of reason why we would like to do this:

Seaworthiness – more comfortable ride in a sea state.
Stiffer – ability to handle higher wind speeds
Speed – allows an extended cruising range, especially for a 2 day weekend.
2nd stateroom – maybe with it’s own private head will allow us to bring guest in a comfortable way.
More storage.
Larger water tank capacity
Larger fuel tank capacity
Larger cockpit for entertaining and taking naps under way and at anchor.


Larger boats also generally come with certain systems that our 30’ does not have:

Radar
Refrigeration
Reverse cycle a/c
Electric anchor windlass
Better autopilot that acts on rudder quadrant.
Possibility to fit Genset.
Propane oven and stove as opposed to alcohol (difficult to regulate heat in oven)
Integrated inverter
Dual anchor roller
Salt water wash down
Cockpit shower
Dinghy davits or enough space for a RIB on foredeck
etc
 

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My wife Glinda and I got the sailing bug in the mid 70's while in San Diego while I was in the Navy. We took classes and rented various 18 to 21 footer's for a day sail on the bay. After I retired we found a 19 ft Glocester trailable and had a good time with it, but, putting the mast up every time was a real pain, We then went to a Morgan 27 (which we bought at a Thrift store, for $1,200.) Yea I know, you don't hear the too often. But the morgan was just too tippy when you got on board and it had a swing keel to put up with. We eventully found the sailboat we loved a 1976 Irwin 37CC. It's got lots of room and we are able to handle her with just us two. Although being an older boat it comes with a few items to work on, but what sailboat doesn't. We've had her for 5 years and everytime we go out or just down for the weekend to relax it's a joy.

Take Care,

Mike & Glinda McKee
s/v Blue Bayou
 

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Trading up is quite common for some folks, and dreaming about it is even more common, I am guilty of the latter but for now that is all it is, a dream.
There are several variables influencing my position, primarily seasons. Too many financial eggs in one basket for such a short season makes me re-evaluate my needs relative to my wants during every dream. Both of us still waiting for retirement is another factor since unless we are retired we will not be able to match the time sailing to the investment, we need to be retired to get the hours of sailing in. Sailing style and venue also play a big role - we mostly daysail with only a few extended 4-5 day trips per year and we are in the protected waters of the PNW San Juans & Gulf Islands. We are still relatively new to boating, started in 2003 so we have a bit more experience to aquire.
For now our current 26' boat serves us very well, gets us everywhere in the PNW and is very affordable and versatile. There is only the two of us, so space is not an issue. We also live within 15 minutes of the marina so access is not an issue during sailing season and since we live so close we never overnight at the marina. There are those who trade up because they spend every weekend at the marina so require a home away from home. Of course there are many other reasons for trading up which is why folks do, but I really have no ligitimate reason to require a bigger boat other than pure want and for now that does not qualify. Now if I was to suddenly come into a load of $$$, well, that would definately qualify.
 

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Hi,

I bought my first sailboat, a Catalina 22 in 2003. I was looking for a trailerable boat with a small cabin. Something that was cheap, easy to sail and learn on, and had enough room below for the kids to get out of the sun. The Catalina 22 was the perfect boat.

What I didn't anticipate was getting totally hooked on sailing. Before the sailboat I had (still have actually) a race car, and a big RV to tow the race car. My family and I would use the RV for vacations and weekend trips. After we bought the sailboat my interest in racing the car really declined. The RV didn't get used much either. Anyway, after one season with the Catalina I wanted to get a bigger boat, something we could spend a weekend on. This way the boat could be used like the RV, only GETTING THERE would be fun, instead of a hassle, like with the RV.

So midway through my second season with the Catalina 22, I bought a Newport 28. The Newport was great for day sails. It was bigger, faster, and more seaworthy than the Catalina. The head and galley were usable, and there were berths for 5. It was OK for weekends, but too small for longer than that.

After three years with the Newport, I wanted a boat big enough to spend a week or longer on. So I bought an O'day 35. The first season we spent a week vacation on board and it was great.

I don't anticipate changing boats again for a long time.

Barry
 

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Telstar 28
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Wrote this for another thread, but think it applies here too. :)

I think that it depends on where you are in life... it seems that most people go up to a larger boat and then as the kids and such no longer sail commonly with them...downsize... Many important sailing figures have settled on rather small boats as their ideal sailboat...

As I said in a previous post:

Look at what boats some very well respected sailboat designers chose. Many chose smaller boats for their personal sailing craft.

Capt. Nat Herreshoff designed for himself the 26' "Alerion III". When Capt. Nat was in his seventies and living in Florida, he sailed a 30' K/CB "Pleasure"

Joel White sailed a Bridges Point 24 named "Ellisha" after his grandaughter

Phil Rhodes sailed a wooden 25 footer named "Nixie"

Carl Alberg sailed a 26' Pearson Commander named after his wife "Alma"

Bob Perry sails a 26' Cirrus called "Perrywinkle"
 

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My wife Glinda and I got the sailing bug in the mid 70's while in San Diego while I was in the Navy. We took classes and rented various 18 to 21 footer's for a day sail on the bay. After I retired we found a 19 ft Glocester trailable and had a good time with it, but, putting the mast up every time was a real pain, We then went to a Morgan 27 (which we bought at a Thrift store, for $1,200.) Yea I know, you don't hear the too often. But the morgan was just too tippy when you got on board and it had a swing keel to put up with. We eventully found the sailboat we loved a 1976 Irwin 37CC. It's got lots of room and we are able to handle her with just us two. Although being an older boat it comes with a few items to work on, but what sailboat doesn't. We've had her for 5 years and everytime we go out or just down for the weekend to relax it's a joy.

Take Care,

Mike & Glinda McKee
s/v Blue Bayou
Hey Mike - is your Irwin a sloop or ketch? I've really gotten interested in this boat, especially with the CC configurartion. What would you say the upsides/downsides are to cruising it in the Gulf and Carib? I've seen some claim that it's not sturdy enough for blue water - so I'm curious. Thanks.
 

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Mud Hen #69, Mad Hatter
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What reasons would you have for trading boats?
My wife (THE ADMIRAL) and I peaked at 34 ft/13,000 lbs and are on the way back down. Smaller, more easily managed and more "distilled" of a sailing experience.

We have friends whjo still own & sail their first boat - a 1984 Cerubini Hunter 30. Seems they got it right for their needs in one.
 

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I'm sailing my second boat, a C&C 34 but think about my first boat, a Tartan 27 practically every day. The decision to go bigger was grounded in three young children and expanding crew. Just needed room. While the C&C sails nicely, it can't match the sweetness of the Tartan, the feeling of "wearing" the boat, much like the feeling you get driving a 1962 Corvette as compared to a new Corvette. The new Vette is fast, technologically superior, blah, blah blah, but I'll take the '62.

I have a deal with the buyer of my Tartan that I get it back in 10 years when the kids are grown. Actually, my 13 year old daughter has dibs on it!
I speak with the new owner regularly!

Skywalker II
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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I'm quite happy with my current boat. It does everything I want of it, though I will admit, there are some things I'd like different. Basically, having the shrouds inboard, and the beam running all the way aft. Other than that though, it's a great boat for what I do, and intend to do.

Like one of the other posters, if money became available, I'd be most inclined to do a total refit, rather than buy something different.
 

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Look at what boats some very well respected sailboat designers chose. Many chose smaller boats for their personal sailing craft.

Capt. Nat Herreshoff designed for himself the 26' "Alerion III". When Capt. Nat was in his seventies and living in Florida, he sailed a 30' K/CB "Pleasure"

Joel White sailed a Bridges Point 24 named "Ellisha" after his grandaughter

Phil Rhodes sailed a wooden 25 footer named "Nixie"

Carl Alberg sailed a 26' Pearson Commander named after his wife "Alma"

Bob Perry sails a 26' Cirrus called "Perrywinkle"
And some sailed on other people's boats. Olin Stephens never owned another boat after Dorade.

"To the extent I had the time and interest, I wanted to sail only in the new boats."

I bet he sailed on any boat he wanted.
 

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To, Smackdaddy
When we first started looking for a larger boat, the idea was to find something that we could handle by ourselves. Although the Irwin is pretty big it isn't too big for us. The man we bought it off of took it to the BVI every fall
via the ditch and he said with a little care and being carefull about what wind's he would venture into the Irwin was really stable. Glinda & I don't plan to take her down there since it's a 1976, but I won't think twice to take her on a coastal trip or out on the Cheasapeake. The boat is a ketch rig. I've got some photo's of her on this webb site under (Mike & Glinda's 37CC)
Irwin Owners.
Though the years we've had her there hasn't been any second thought's, that this was just right for us. You just have to understand that a boat built back then is going to have a few more items to work on, since previous owner's have did renovations that sometimes leave me with a sence of wonder as in "why in the H#LL did they run that wire through there".
I hope this is helpfull and if you do get a Irwin 37CC let me know, I've got the the owners, parts and operating manuals for it on my computer and I could send them to you.

Good Luck,

Mike & Glinda
s/v Blue Bayou
 

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Mike,

Thanks for taking the time to respond. I'll take a look at those photos. I also like the Seafarer 38. It seems to be a really safe, solid boat. But I think my family would enjoy being on the Irwin CC for it's lay out and comfort. So, it's one of those trade-off things that I'm considering carefully. I really want them to love sailing as much as I do - and I really want to keep them safe with a solid boat (especially considering it's "skipper"). In any case, we have no plans to venture outside the Gulf for the foreseeable future.

A guy named StillRaining has a 41' CC I believe and loves it. So it's pretty compelling.

I will stay in touch on our purchase. I've got a lot to learn in the mean time - sailing my C27 as much as possible. Fortunately, we've got year round conditions here.

Thanks again, dude.

Smack
 
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