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sailing community NEWBIE
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys n gals. Need some help;

I have bought a monarch 17 trailer sailer; currently on the trailer out in the back yard. have completely rebuilt the interior/ Exterior new rigging; but i missed one big thing.... The centerboard cable has broken off inside the metal tube that runs through the boat. Can i replace this wire in the water dockside ? by swimming under ? Unless anyone has any other ideas. centerboard is 50 -60 lb cast iron.
thanks !:hothead
 

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One of None
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Yes, you have my permission to work on your boat :rolleyes:


You could.. but it's only a 17. pull it out again and not get the cold or flu! Or at least guide it onto the trailer and fix it in knee deep water.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
my boat floats i hope;

my tiny little trailer sailer is going to sail across oceans ;) work hard to play hard.

I just dont know if the cable i put in will slide through easy ? or if i could just use a strong rope.
 

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Or you can do what I did when we owned a Venture 22. Jack up the boat using 2x12's under the hull. Support the 2x12's on saw horses. Now lower the center board down.
What? It won't go down because its stuck in the trunk due to rust? Looks like you will have to remove the centerboard, have it sandblasted, coated with epoxy then finish it with bottom paint.
 

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Rather than push the cable through, use a fish-wire to establish the run, then pull the cable through. You may need to follow Captainmeme to get full access to the cable run.
 

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Don't even think of doing it in the water. Way too complicated. On little boats like that centerboard is the key to sailing and you have to make sure it works right and that the board is in good condition. Iron keels need proper maintenance and a good coat of paint. Instead of steel cable you may want to consider a dyneema rope. Stronger, rust free, and easier to work with.
 

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It's definitely easier to do it out of the water, and line will last longer and be easier to handle than stainless wire. If you do have to pull the board and refinish it, graphite mixed into epoxy and painted on the board will make it very slippery and inhibit growth.
 

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In my opinion it would be best to just use a stainless cable as was originally installed on that boat. Rope or line is not going to be as strong and any vibration on the line when going a little faster (common on center board boats) may fray the line and eventually fail and then you will be in the same situation. Pull the boat and do it that way as others has said but I personally would not use rope or line.
 

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Spectra has a higher load capability that stainless wire and is unlikely to fray if installed properly. Running stainless wire over a sheave will eventually break down the wire guaranteed. Spectra will last much longer.
 

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I must be looking at the wrong Spectra. The information I see has the following specs

Spectra 3/16 inch Tensile strength @ 3800lbs
Stainless 3/16 inch 7x17 and 7x7 stranded Tensile strength @ 3700lbs
Stainless 3/16 inch 1x9 stranded Tensile strength @ 4700lbs
That doesn't take into consideration the weakening of the bends in the rope. At least it is a wash and in my opinion the rope even spectra will fray and weaken way before the stainless. That being said we are talking about a small weighted dagger board on a so it seems that either would be fine for that application so I do change my opinion on the line should spectra be used (or comparable line.) Were the application for a boat like my former MacGregor 222 with a 500+ swing keel I would go with stainless.

Aircraft Cable Galvanized & Stainless Steel, Nylon & Vinyl Coated Cable, Cablelaid, & Strand | WorldWide Enterprises, Inc.

http://www.machovec.com/rope/spectra_12strand.htm
 

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I assume the reason why you want to do it in the water is because the rope is broken with the centerboard in the down position. It will be a real problem getting it back on the trailer with it down. otherwise you would do it on the trailer in the parking lot of your favorite boat launch. You might try using ratchet straps to get the center board up so you can get it on a trailer. I like and trust stainless steel wire rope.
 

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I understood that the boat is ON the trailer on the hard. All my trailer centerboarders had something on the trailer like a tray or cross member to support the centerboard in the up position.

Since it is hard up he cannot drop it and see where the lifting line attaches. I think I'd use stainless due to the inevitable barnacles that will form in the trunk, assuming salt water use.

Since the stern hangs off the trailer, start there. Lower the truck end of the trailer to the ground, using jacks with the trailer jack swung up. This will raise the stern. Then support the stern with boat stands or make wooden supports.

Now jack up the front (truck end) of the trailer which will lower the rear and leave the stern on the stands.

Hard part is supporting the front end of the boat. You will need a strap hanging from a large tripod, frame of beams, heavy branch, or in my case a tractor bucket. I did this on a bigger 23 footer. Make sure the strap cannot slip forward.

Now the boat is off the trailer and you can pull the trailer forward enough to let down the board. Make sure all your supports are doubled up, use blocking or whatever, you don't want to go under without solid support. If the board is crazy long dig a hole. Good time to check the trailer support bunks also.

Now use a fish wire to poke through and pull the line with the fish wire. Of course, if the board is stuck up, you will have to do what it takes to drop it, hopefully just barnacles and not swollen rust.

Definitely clean, repair, paint the board.

When you get to the water you should be as ready as possible.

As an aside, I once finished all my repairs, launched the boat, parked the trailer, and found that the boat was sinking because the drains would not shut properly. Rush around getting trailer back in water before boat too low to retrieve. To add to the fun one of the bunk boards came off and started floating away....

Then it started raining so hard it was lucky the boat leaked!:eek:
 

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I've got one of these boats, there are a few different systems for the swing keel, and some mods to make replacing the wire rope a bit more user friendly, I have some basic diagrams from a users manual that the owners group made a few years ago, pm me if you want that info
 

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Another way to get the boat off the trailer is to jack up the trailer, then build a simple wooden cradle under the boat and then lower the trailer out from under the boat. The cradle should be designed so that it allows you access to the centerboard. I did it with a Catalina 22. Your boat should be considerably lighter in weight and easier to do.
 

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our local boat shop has a tall lift mounted in their parking lot with straps and big electric winches. That's how I plan to get my keel out, I'll have them pick it up, move my truck below and lower the keel into the bed, then have them put the boat keelless back onto the trailer. Then I can work on the keel on my own time and reverse the process to get it back in... that's the plan anyway - I haven't asked how much they'll charge yet.

I have one of the 500+ cast iron keels that they were talking about though.

Look around for a shop with a similar setup and ask what they'd charge. It would be super easy and safe that way.
 

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Hi, I have the same problem on my Monarch 17/ Tropic 520. I am in the process of uploading a video to youtube now that shows the quick fix I did in the water. We threaded some thick fishing line down the hole the wire was to run down and pulled the wire through like that. Once down the hole I snorkelled underwater and tied the cable on. This was actually started at night time and I had my brother shining a torch down a 5mm hole to provide a tiny sliver of light. It was a bit much so I finished it the next morning. Which is what you see on the video. The problem was that the centreboard fits quite snugly inside the centreboard casing and the knot I tied in the wire jammed the whole lot in there when we pulled it up. I tried to get it down the next time I put it in the water but it comes down a bit but wont budge the rest of the way. At least not with myself pulling down on it. Anyway my solution, (which I have yet to try) will be to let her dry out on a sand bank at low tide then tip her over using the mast and weighting it down whilst also jamming a wedge under the small skeg keel to stop it from tipping back up. I figure laying on its side on the sand bank I can work dry and get the keel out. I then intend to run a small long D shackle through the hole in the keel as I notice that the hole was quite jagged and will likely cut the wire again at some point in the future. I will then run the wire through the smooth D shackle and swage it. I will let you know if this all works and I would love some feedback as to whether anyone else thinks it will work? I will post a link to the video I mentioned with the underwater footage once it is uploaded so you might have some idea of what you are in for when you get to the keel. When I get around to the fix I will try to shoot a video of that too if anyone wants to see how it works, or spectacularly fails.
 
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