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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Originally posted this inside another thread but thought I would go ahead and start a new one?


I wish someone could compare all the options for training. ASA coast guard etc etc. there seem to be many choices?

Well I imagine its been done but I'm not a good searcher -- any help?

Had some basic training then went sailing for 15 years then was out of the game for the most part for a second 15 years except a few charters and now getting back into it.

Probably not going to do anything commercial but there is a chance that down the road I may instruct or do some small boat delivery.

I think just basic is what I need now but it would sure be nice if it could be used later if I go beyond basic???
 

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USCG Aux courses as well as US Power and Sail Squadron are classroom courses.

ASA and US Sailing will get you on the water.

If your intention is to be a delivery skipper, as much on-water time as possible as well as your CG-issued captain's license will be required.
 
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Donna -
A license is not legally required for deliveries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
USCG Aux courses as well as US Power and Sail Squadron are classroom courses.

ASA and US Sailing will get you on the water.

If your intention is to be a delivery skipper, as much on-water time as possible as well as your CG-issued captain's license will be required.
That USCG classroom must be what I did 30 years ago- lol
 

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That USCG classroom must be what I did 30 years ago- lol
Quite possibly nothing has changed much since then, either. Oh, no Loran. But it's still in the book. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You can get compensated all you want for deliveries, you are still not legally required to have a captain's license.
Well that's great news - one less guy looking over my back is a good thing and may get me some more adventures sooner?:):):)
 

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Music,

You are confusing training with experience...

ASA courses are good for what they do...

The USCG Capt. License is an excellent theory test...

However, a USCG license and every course ASA teach will not give you the experience to handle my boat in a Force 9 gale or get her into somewhere at night, in a dense fog, with a broken radar and chart plotter, in a 2 knot cross current!

Good luck with your plans. The 4-5 month RYA courses are good but they need to be done in serious tidal waters in winter not sunny climes. I do not know of any equivalent US courses.
 

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Music,

It really comes down to your personal goals.

If you own a Sailboat, you can just go sailing. If you need a refresher course, Either ASA and US sailing can provide various levels of on-the-water instruction. If you want to teach sailing they each have pathways to becoming an instructor.

Additionally many US states, have now imposed a requirement that you possess a Boating Safety Certificate ( usually for: Jet Skis, motor boats or sailboats with auxiliary engines) That's the 1st thing you should look into,IMO. What does your state require?

That requirement is often waived if you possess a USCG license.

If your goal is to take passengers for hire, you will need the relevant CG license ( here in the states) That includes sailing instruction ( passengers for hire) if it's a powered sailing vessel.

Passing a CG exam is only one phase of the requirement. Medical exam, eye test, drug testing, a TWIC card and documented sea time are also required. I've heard it said here that people can lie about their sea time, and I don't doubt that it's done. But, the fact remains that if you take passengers for hire, you'll need the license.

Deliveries are private arrangements between you and the owner, or agent. No license other than the State requirements are needed. But, clearly you would need to establish some level of credentials/proven capabilities before someone will entrust their vessel in your care.

There are many pathways and levels to gaining experience both formal and informal.

if you want to turn that experience into the ability to earn money then the regulations get very specific depending on where you are what you're doing.

The only RYA schools/programs I've seen in the US are in Ft Lauderdale Fla. and Newport, RI.

ASA and US sailing are the predominant schools/programs in the States. While I have no doubt that RYA is a superb program, their presence in the US is somewhat limited.

There's a member here, who doesn't own a boat, but volunteers to crew on every passage he can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Music,

You are confusing training with experience...

ASA courses are good for what they do...

The USCG Capt. License is an excellent theory test...

However, a USCG license and every course ASA teach will not give you the experience to handle my boat in a Force 9 gale or get her into somewhere at night, in a dense fog, with a broken radar and chart plotter, in a 2 knot cross current!

Good luck with your plans. The 4-5 month RYA courses are good but they need to be done in serious tidal waters in winter not sunny climes. I do not know of any equivalent US courses.
I kind of know what your saying because my experience is more like I think yours is except on a much smaller scale.

On the other hand I have forgotten more then I know and there are arias in my experience that are week even for a newbi.--ie the training questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Great info Tempest and I think I'm getting the idea how it works.

A long time from now I may need that medical so this brings up an additional question.

I have had some heart issues so this is my question and comments to clarify.
1-for a truck driver with a history of heart problems in addition to your normal doctor who is trained to give you a medical a cardiologist must also check you out.
2- for a pilot in the same situation it sounds similar but is very different.
Not only must a cardiologist check you out and perform additional tests but the results of the test get shipped off to a 6 person panel of cardiologists paid by the GOVERNMENT and not by you : and they determine the outcome.
3 - So my question is would the medical be more like the truck driver or more like the pilot with regard to a Captains license ?
 

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Great info Tempest and I think I'm getting the idea how it works.

A long time from now I may need that medical so this brings up an additional question.

I have had some heart issues so this is my question and comments to clarify.
1-for a truck driver with a history of heart problems in addition to your normal doctor who is trained to give you a medical a cardiologist must also check you out.
2- for a pilot in the same situation it sounds similar but is very different.
Not only must a cardiologist check you out and perform additional tests but the results of the test get shipped off to a 6 person panel of cardiologists paid by the GOVERNMENT and not by you : and they determine the outcome.
3 - So my question is would the medical be more like the truck driver or more like the pilot with regard to a Captains license ?

Interesting question.

Here's a link that leads to other links..that should provide some guidance:

Medical Requirements page United States Coast Guard National Maritime Center

I'd say generally it could depend on how your Doc writes up the condition..whether or not it raises a flag. And, perhaps the level of license being applied for.

Additionally, an employer may have their own requirements and level of clearance, base on their risk management assessment.

Higher level licenses that have STCW requirements have seen changes in the last few years..
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Interesting question.

Here's a link that leads to other links..that should provide some guidance:
Medical Requirements page United States Coast Guard National Maritime Center[/url]

I'd say generally it could depend on how your Doc writes up the condition..whether or not it raises a flag. And, perhaps the level of license being applied for.

Additionally, an employer may have their own requirements and level of clearance, base on their risk management assessment.

Higher level licenses that have STCW requirements have seen changes in the last few years..
Well thank you again! The highest level of professional sailing I see myself doing is taking people on a charter on my own (future : as mine is too small for guests)personal boat. This is assuming that my understanding of some limited delivery and maybe a bit of instruction require less or the same scrutiny.

I won't have time to check out your info for a day or two but thanks again and it will be years before I feel like I'm ready but just trying to get started in the right direction.

Ps I had to take your link out of the quote because my post count is too low.
 
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