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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to separate a Paragon 23R transmission from a Perkins 4.270 engine. The best I've been able to do is get the adapter plate about 1/4" away from the bell housing. Yes, I've looked very carefully to ensure that there are no bolts still holding things up. Researching the parts manuals and transmission installation guide it seems that the transmission should just slide in and out.

The only thing that I can figure is that the splines are corroded and or seized to the damper plate. Prior to getting more aggressive than I already have I thought I'd ask here to see if anyone else has any suggestions.

Thanks

Mike
 

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Assuming it's similar to this version:

http://www.chriscraft35.com/paragontransmission.pdf

There certainly seems no reason to think that the spline wouldn't just disengage with a good pull aft. I suspect you're right in thinking it's gummed up somehow.

I'd be tempted to insert a couple of wedges into the gap from opposite sides and tap them towards each other as a form of controlled, gentle persuasion..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Faster
Thanks for the response. It is the Paragon P200 in the link you posted.

I got pretty aggressive with it this afternoon, no luck. I pulled the starter and think I'm going to squirt a can of PB Plaster in as best as I can. I can't see the splines from the hole but hopefully will get enough PB down there to loosen things up. Not worried about seals being damaged by the PB as I'm doing a complete rebuild of the motor and transmission.

Thanks again

Mike
 

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Good luck!
 

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Mechsmith
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I had to cut a hole in the cover housing and take the bolts out of the flywheel on a similar deal. Excessive force will damage the front bearing in some cases. this damage may not show up for a while.
 

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Mechsmith
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Hopefully you could use a dental mirror or see enough flywheel through the crack that you have to help determine the location of the bolts.
 

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islander bahama 24
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Are there jacking bolts for the transmission ( bolt holes with threads in them ) if so will take a larger bolt and just tighten them each a little at a time till it pops apart worth a check prior to cutting and drilling.
 

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You say you've got a1/4 inch gap>> If you can slip in a nut at each hole, Screw a longer bolt in thru plate, thru nut and into bell housing, Put a wrench to each nut and walk them out the threaded bolt.Even pressure all around until you can get at the drive plate bolts if it hasn't already popt Personally, I like an access hole in the adapter plate(about 2 in dis)With a cover so to access the bolts . Seen many come lose or snap their heads. Also like the drive plate with the rubber cups to cut down on rattle and make in and out easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the suggestions. I ended up drilling a 2" hole in the adapter plate. The 1/2" steel was loads of fun to cut thru, lots of cutting oil helped . Of course the bolts were safety wired and about 2" below the hole. So, with a custom bent wrench and a long Dremel tool to cut the wire away I got the job done.

The flange was solidly rusted to the transmission shaft so I'm glad I didn't try to force it.

Mike
 

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Thanks for the follow-up.... doesn't sound like a lot of fun!
 

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islander bahama 24
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Glad it worked out for you. When reinstalling it use some good marine grease on the pilot shaft like it should have been done by previous installer. Will make it much easier to remove the next time there's an issue.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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A better lubricant for this type of application (high pressure, metal to metal, probable moisture, possible high temp) would be molybdenum disulfide grease;
 
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Isn't "Tef-Gel" another go-to for this sort of thing?
 

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islander bahama 24
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Isn't "Tef-Gel" another go-to for this sort of thing?
Yes it is one of the better go to for this I just didn't went to get to specific is all. people seem to not like when I get specific.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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With all due respect, I disagree.
From TEF-GEL - Ultra safety systems - Home page
1. The function of Tef-Gel in eliminating dissimilar metal corrosion is the elimination of electrolytes from entering the interface of the metallic surfaces. Tef-Gel paste contains 40% PTFE powder and 0% volatile solvents, no silicones or petroleum solvents to evaporate, which would leave voids for electrolytes to be drawn into creating a galvanic cell. When both surfaces are coated and mated with Tef-Gel there are no voids for electrolytes (saltwater) to be drawn in by capillary action over extended periods of time.
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2. The function of Tef-Gel in eliminating seizing galling and friction welding of stainless steel, inconel, and other nickel alloys.
I used to use Molly Grease when assembling driveline components on motorcycles. At the time, there was quite a debate about it vs marine grease (much like crimping vs soldering), but the final conclusion is that Molly Grease was the appropriate lube for the conditions stated in my prior post.
 

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Corsair 24
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good ole moly but I love me some waterproof bearing grease or heavy duty trailer grease

anything is better than nothing
 
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