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Bombay Explorer 44
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Discussion Starter #1
I have an old style Trident gas control panel with a gas sensor system.

The solenoid part works fine but I have just discovered that the warning sensor is not functioning and may never have been while the boat is in my ownership. It looks like the previous owner has disconnected it.

I would fit a new one from Trident but they have changed the shape of the panel. Redoing my cabinetry to accommodate the new shape would be a major PITA.

Does anyone know where I can get the old style shape? If not can I fit just the gas sensor to my existing panel?

Doing stuff on a boat is never easy.

 

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BJV
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242 Posts
Most alarm systems allow for a new sensor as they do expire. Not cheap, but check with trident to confirm they have a replacement sensor compatible withyour system.
 

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One of None
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I have one on my boat by the other mfg. same thing the sensor is $$$ about third the cost of a new complete unit.
 

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How about just making a cover plate out of varnished teak that fits the space of the old panel, but make it bigger ( because the new Trident panel is "portrait" instead of "landscape"). You can even use the same screw holes. Drill a round hole in the middle and mount the new unit. Easy and it will look classy.
 

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TQA,

This may not be what you are looking for, BUT....

I installed the same unit on our boat back around 2000. After about a year cruising and living aboard 24/7, I cut the sensor off the system! I was getting a false alarm every few days. I would stop and rig an engine blower, let it run for a half hour or so, check for leaks with leak det fluid, then start all over again! It got to be a real pain in the a&&^%$#@#!!!

If I were you, and I felt I must have an alarm installed, go with another brand!

I STILL have the unit installed as you said, the cut off switch still works just fine. I did have to change the solenoid in Mexico one time.

Greg
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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3,619 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I think I would rather live with an over sensitive alarm system than die from not having one.

This is happened to some one I knew.

John was killed when his boat blew up off the coast of St Vincent in March this year. It was almost certainly a propane explosion.
 

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I think I would rather live with an over sensitive alarm system than die from not having one.

This is happened to some one I knew.

John was killed when his boat blew up off the coast of St Vincent in March this year. It was almost certainly a propane explosion.

First, I do know that propane can be dangerous and needs to be handled with care. We ALWAYS shut off the solenoid, let the burner go out and only then shut off the stove control. I am NOT treating the subject lightly.

We moved aboard full time many years ago (1996). We cruised full time down the west coast through the Sea of Cortez and Mexico for years. We now cruise about half time.

I have to say that having the alarm does insure you are safe, it just helps. IF you are so concerned about the use of propane, don't use it. Go with a diesel stove. NOT alcohol as it can be as dangerous, or more so than propane.

One of my pet peeves is the constant cry of the sellers that "You life depends on it" as a way to scare people into spending more money.

By the way, a false alarm from the unit may put you at risk!

Picture this;
You are sailing about 100 miles off the Pacific Baja coast.
The wind is fresh, maybe 25 to 35 and may be building.
It's about 0200 with almost no moon.
You are handling sails and reefing. AND THE PROPANE ALARM SOUNDS! :(
And it might be for the 4th or 6th time that night. :mad:

What do you do?

That actually took place and, I am happy to report, we are still here. There NEVER was ANY propane leak. ;)

Greg
 

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One of None
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Picture this;
You are sailing about 100 miles off the Pacific Baja coast.
The wind is fresh, maybe 25 to 35 and may be building.
It's about 0200 with almost no moon.
You are handling sails and reefing. AND THE PROPANE ALARM SOUNDS! :(
And it might be for the 4th or 6th time that night. :mad:

What do you do?

That actually took place and, I am happy to report, we are still here. There NEVER was ANY propane leak. ;)
Being around fuels most of my professional life it's just second nature for me to very sure the tanks are off, and the lines purged before even thinking of getting underway.

Still, a false alarm can cause some people to to test and wind up letting gas out for the test!
 

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I have the current Trident unit, and it won't work without the sensor attached. Likewise if the sensor fails, everything defaults to fault condition. (I know people who carry a spare sensor with them)

My unit has NEVER false alarmed, not once, in 3 years of use. If yours kept alarming, either it was faulty, or you had a leak of propane or another hydrocarbon.

The way I see it, you have a broken safety device. Replacing broken things with working ones is a normal part of boat ownership, especially when it's a safety item.

Just buy the latest version and make it fit.
 

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I have the current Trident unit, and it won't work without the sensor attached. Likewise if the sensor fails, everything defaults to fault condition. (I know people who carry a spare sensor with them)
I have a newer Trident sensor, solenoid, and control panel. Make a small jumper that connects the green and white in the connector(might be different on other models) and the Trident control panel will think the sensor is attached and working, allowing one to make fixes while still using the gas.

I DO NOT RECOMMEND THIS AS A LONG TERM SOLUTION, but it's handy when you know the gas is off at the bottles and you want to get some sleep without beeping or cook a meal.

Sorry for reviving old thread. Stumbled on this and thought it might offer a solution for others.
 
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