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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
The Link 2000 probably has nothing to do with overcharging your batteries, since it is a charge monitor, not a charge controller, unless you have the Link 2000R, which has an external regulator for your alternator. The Freedom 25 is probably configured wrong. :) Yes, you can set the Freedom 25 from the Link 2000.

How many batteries did you have in your house bank? The problem may be the size of the charger you're using. The Freedom 25 is an 130 Amp charger, and unless you've got four or more 6V golf-cart sized batteries, the size of the charger may be the problem. BTW, if you're going to go with Trojan T105 type wet-cell batteries, you'll need at least six for the charger to be about the right size. A battery charger shouldn't be more than about 20% of the battery bank's capacity for wet cells. Six T-105 batteries will be 675 amp hours of battery capacity, 20% of that is 135 amps.

As Steve has pointed out AGMs are probably a better choice if you neglect basic battery maintenance, but the Trojans will work very well if you care for them properly. More batteries die of neglect and abuse than ever die of old age. :)
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
...Steve and SD are correct that you will get more bang for your buck with wet cells if you maintain them. On the other hand if your system is set up properly for the you will get very good service with the AGM batteries and not have to be adding water as you will have to with wet cells.
If you over charge AGMs though, you can dehydrate the electrolyte and destroy the batteries very easily.
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
Traditional wisdom for wet-cell batteries is not to charge at more than 20% of the battery bank capacity as a maximum charging rate. You can charge at a higher rate and get away with it...but it generally isn't too good for the batteries. AGM batteries have a much higher current acceptance rate and can often be charged at closer to 50% or so of battery bank capacity.

Some of the newer technology batteries can be charged at even higher rates.
So based on this, 4 Trojans would be 450 amp hours so the charger should not exceed 90 amps? That's a worry.

I have only four T-105's in my house bank. I also have a Freedom 25 charger. I also have a 185 amp alt on my main engine which routinely pumps 140 amps into the house bank when it's a little soft. I can't say I've ever had an overcharge situation because of this. I monitor the whole lot via a Link 20. My batteries aren't gassing and I'm not losing a lot of water.

Most cars have a 65Ah battery driven by a 55 amp alternator. That's quite a bit more than 20%. Most are wet cells.

I always thought that the regulator decided what amperage was delivered to the batteries. Not the charger.

Am I wrong? Again?
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
BTW, Hydrogen is pretty good at escaping... Helium isn't as active and look at how it does from sealed mylar balloons. :) You probably don't need a whole lot of venting for a battery box...as long as the vent is at the top of the box... :) Hydrogen rises...fairly rapidly.
 
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