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well call me stupid(basic) but we trolled the seas a lot with some basics

50lb line or so...reels and or those plastic rings, a bungee a bell and then your choice of lure

the all time best was a red and white cork or wood lure...they look like a cylindrical squid...they are about 4-5 inches long

next best was the typical big bluefin squid lure and after that any sort of flashy squid colored lure

notice they all imitate squid?

we caught wahoo, dorado, tuna of all sorts, and shark...occasional mackarel, occasional billed fish....the point was NOT to reel in salfish and or marlin as its too hectic and problematic on a sailboat.

the reel( we almost never used a rod...just a spool or wood pallet) is left on the stern or coaming...letout enough line for your second stern wave(it will be surfing down that face of the wave so you can see it better) then we tied a loop, used a bungee to hook it to the rail...hung a bell on it if we felt like it...


some places in the pacific are prolific so all you had to do was see if the bungee stretched...the indian in places is kind of dead...red sea is awesome...the gulf is awesome as is the coast of florida...

central america and pacific west coast is good...

anywhoo

good luck
 

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In the Caribbean, we've had good success with Tuna and even Wahoo trolling with a hand line with heavy mono (100 lb) and wire leaders to plastic squid. This works well as these pelagic fish can swim at cruising speeds, and they are good to eat.

Around here we don't troll. At lower speeds you can pick up some blue fish, but who wants to eat them:p
 

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We call it a meat hook, various lures on a sturdy line, rarely use a pole. Wahoo my favorite, but a little Mahi Mahi is nice in the afternoon.
 

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word on the wahoo...I found I liked it best...

tuna while awesome got a bit old...we often threw them back over

however when courageous we would dry cure our tuna loins over a long passage..the spanish call this mojama...or dry cured tuna for english speakers...

in any case

I remember using a rod once(this on a 37 footer with stern platform) and we actually lost a big hit) most of the time on spools.

back to lures...we did the standard steel line to lure with a swivel so it wont twist endlessly

the steel line helps ´prevent loss from big shark hits and the like

anhywhoo

good thread

cant remember where we talked about this ad naseum..have a feeling it was the 5oo a month thread

peace
 
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In the Caribbean, we've had good success with Tuna and even Wahoo trolling with a hand line with heavy mono (100 lb) and wire leaders to plastic squid. This works well as these pelagic fish can swim at cruising speeds, and they are good to eat.

Around here we don't troll. At lower speeds you can pick up some blue fish, but who wants to eat them:p
some blue fish aint bad

the oiliness is good on the bbq...
 

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Bluefish are great if you know how to clean and cook them. I use a rod for a number of reasons, mainly controlling the fish. Yes, you can catch a bluefin or yellowfin tuna with a handline, but I don't really recommend this. A rod does a much better job.

Use 50 to 80 pound standup gear and you can land just about anything in the ocean. I have two rod holders on my boat and both are rail mounts that do a great job of keeping things out of the way and organized. Squid imitations are the best, with the most effective being a cheap cedar plug for just about everything that swims.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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Gary, it was a sad day when I lost my favorite cedar plug lure.That lure caught more fish then any other lure I've ever used. It was really battered by all the strikes. +1 on the steel leader.
 

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I don't know how people use a rod n reel if they don't slow the boat when a fish is on???
I've been using hand lines since 1970. A plastic squid with an egg lure in the head blue/white is a good all around lure, or feather jigs in red/white; good for almost tuna/all fish, yellow/green; good for dolphin, and black/purple; good for wahoo. Plugs, as mentioned above work well at slower speeds but they get expensive if you are losing them.
Have the lure about twice the length of the boat behind you at 6 knots, closer if slower, farther if faster. Have plenty of line and move your shock cord accordingly. Remember, it is the boat that attracts the fish. Make sure the lure is clear of the turbulence directly behind the boat, so fish off the quarter. You want it to resemble a flying fish in action in the tropics, so try and have it running down the face of the second or third wave face behind you, bubbling occasionally. Plugs, as mentioned above work well at slower speeds but they get expensive if you are losing them. You can even buy just the red eye heads and use colorful shredded plastic from garbage bags; the fish don't care.
You can't go too fast; I've caught fish up to 17 knots, you just need good shock cord or a reel with a very good drag.
Good luck.
 

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Just this past season, we caught a Mahi by trolling off the eastern shore of Block Island. We were sailing from Menemsha to Block and put the line out for hours and basically ignored it.

I bought a heavy duty deep ocean pole, with rolling glides. I use some ridiculously high strength braided line. I don't recall exactly, but at least 100 lbs and a good level wind reel. I use an even higher test leader and usually a rubber squid or squid skirt.

The point is that it may not be a good time when the fish is on. I may be in the middle of trimming, or even tacking. I wanted gear that would frankly drag the fish until I was ready to deal with it. I have hundreds of yards of line on the reel, but the longer you let it run, the more work you'll do to get it in. I like to troll with a surface bait right around the trailing edge of our wake. Some bait fish are known to follow there.

You might consider having a rod belt handy. Not necessary for small fish, but you can grab something when trolling that will leave a bruise, if you butt the rod into your abdomen somewhere.
 

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I don't know how people use a rod n reel if they don't slow the boat when a fish is on???
I've been using hand lines since 1970. A plastic squid with an egg lure in the head blue/white is a good all around lure, or feather jigs in red/white; good for almost tuna/all fish, yellow/green; good for dolphin, and black/purple; good for wahoo. Plugs, as mentioned above work well at slower speeds but they get expensive if you are losing them.
Have the lure about twice the length of the boat behind you at 6 knots, closer if slower, farther if faster. Have plenty of line and move your shock cord accordingly. Remember, it is the boat that attracts the fish. Make sure the lure is clear of the turbulence directly behind the boat, so fish off the quarter. You want it to resemble a flying fish in action in the tropics, so try and have it running down the face of the second or third wave face behind you, bubbling occasionally. Plugs, as mentioned above work well at slower speeds but they get expensive if you are losing them. You can even buy just the red eye heads and use colorful shredded plastic from garbage bags; the fish don't care.
You can't go too fast; I've caught fish up to 17 knots, you just need good shock cord or a reel with a very good drag.
Good luck.
yup

tuna, the good ones start biting when the speed goes up...
 

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I've hooked a pair of good sized striped bass (saltwater) with a stainless spoon, a bluefish leader, and 50lb test mono-filament line on the spool that I bought it. I had about 200' of line out behind the boat, and I was wearing a pair of sailing gloves to handle the line.

I thought that I snagged a lobster pot until I got the lure near the boat, and the fish began to run. Sadly, we didn't have a net or a gaff, and BOTH TIMES the fish spit the lure when I tried to haul them out of the water.
 

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I see the OP is in the Sydney, Vancouver Island area of BC. So I assume you want to fish for Salmon. We installed electric Scotty downriggers on Duet and do quite well. I think we caught 10 while up in Barkley Sound for a week last summer. We have also done well in the Straights of Georgia, and my buddy has done well in front of Sooke.

The thing is you have to get down deep, anywhere from 50 to 200'. We troll at 2-2.5 kts almost always with the diesel, but we have caught fish under sail that slow. Just have to have a crew to keep the sails luffing while you play the fish. We have learned to play the fish amidships. Too much stuff (Davits ect) off the stern. We lost a big Chinook when it wrapped the line around the rudder.

So use downriggers, herring, anchovies, or #4 Coyote spoons for bait, and good fishing!
 

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At lower speeds you can pick up some blue fish, but who wants to eat them:p
Capecodder have you noticed Bluefish showing up on more menus this year? Seems to be some kind of trend among chefs to use "trash" fish as a means toward sustainability. While I applaud the concept, they seem to charge the same price as Tuna or Mahi, and there is no way in hell I will pay that for Bluefish. Recently, I can't remember where I was, but the special was pollack. I said to the waiter, "seriously", and he smirked and said I know.
 

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I have never fished for salmon

something on my to do list for sure!
The problem with fishing salmon on a sailboat is going slow enough. Salmon fishing is usually done under 3 knots (1.5 knots is good most times), down 30 to 75 feet and with bait. The most effective method is a downrigger as mentioned above and I just cannot get the boat going slow enough to properly present the bait, especially on my downrigger, which works incredibly well in the tropics, too, by the way, with a big plug.
 

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Yo-yos are my preferred method for trolling (mid-Atlantic) I've landed stripers up to 42 inches and countless blues this way. I like that the lure, sinker, and leader can be pre-rigged (important when fishing for blues and stipers with long leaders), and they are supper compact for storage. I do carry 5 poles for various other sorts of fishing (still fishing, casting and schools, kayak).

Sail Delmarva: Yo-Yo Fishing

No bungee cord (with over 100 feet of mono out, line stretch renders bungee stretch irrelevant), just a flat line clip to register hits. Heavy fish are easily managed by using your arm as the spring and winding with the yo-yo. I landed that 42" fish without gloves. The secret is the yo-yo.



Regarding blues, use a relatively small lure so that you catch smaller fish. Big blues can be strong tasting, but smaller ones are delicious. How big do you really need for a 2-person meal? This little blue is plenty for a fresh super.

Normal sailing speeds are good for blues. Stripers require slowing down. Most trolled fish are best landed with the boat still moving forward, keeping pressure on the hook. With the beam of a cat and stubby outriggers (5') we can set 5 yo-yos, though 2 is more typical.
 

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I just installed an electric downrigger on my liveboard 36' sailboat and used it for the first time at the weekend - hooked into a fish but it got off (in the panic forgot to kick the boat into neutral so was fighting the fish still going at 2 knots).

As mentioned, the hard part is slowing down enough - I found it easiest when trolling with the current, to make sure the downrigger line makes the correct angle.

I have a couple of blog posts about it

Installing the downrigger: Mounting ? Tug Life
First time salmon fishing ? Tug Life

I'm on the south end of Vancouver island btw. Don't see many downriggers on sailboats at all which is surprising
 
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