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Didn't Gonzalo run over Bermuda? Didn't hear a thing about it. As I think about it, I don't recall any regular posters that live in Bermuda. Touched surprised.
I saw a mainstream media headline that said it took out all power to Bermuda.

MedSailor
 

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Discussion Starter #103
Mark:

How about an update on how St. Martin recovering? Any effects that you have noticed on your lifestyle since the storm? Especially interested what became of that Nonsuch Destin(y).

Theres at least 25 boats still ashore. Most of them derelicts i.e. No salvage value and expensive to move. The salvage companies are pretty well on top of everything thats going to pay bills. After that and as the tourist season gets underway the French government is going to have to pay for the removal of about 10 boats on its Marigot tourist beach.

The ones in the Lagoon are a different matter as there are boats splatter about going back through past hurricanes years and years...

Still a few with sails flapping, known owners on island etc. just disgraceful, but if you dont have money what can you do?

Theres still some people doing it very hard with no money, no boat, dontated clothes, no way out. Thats difficult. Those that can find jobs and start again, will, I suppose. The rest need to be repatriated to their come country by the host country.

The general lifestyle here is fine. Its been a spark to the economy, brutal to say, but disasters make people spend money, and makes the workers work hard in a down time part of the season.

Cruise ship passengers would see no difference at all... Nor would anyone else unless they book a hotel in Margot and find a wreck on their beach.
 

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Theres at least 25 boats still ashore. Most of them derelicts i.e. No salvage value and expensive to move. The salvage companies are pretty well on top of everything thats going to pay bills. After that and as the tourist season gets underway the French government is going to have to pay for the removal of about 10 boats on its Marigot tourist beach.

The ones in the Lagoon are a different matter as there are boats splatter about going back through past hurricanes years and years...

Still a few with sails flapping, known owners on island etc. just disgraceful, but if you dont have money what can you do?

Theres still some people doing it very hard with no money, no boat, dontated clothes, no way out. Thats difficult. Those that can find jobs and start again, will, I suppose. The rest need to be repatriated to their come country by the host country.

The general lifestyle here is fine. Its been a spark to the economy, brutal to say, but disasters make people spend money, and makes the workers work hard in a down time part of the season.

Cruise ship passengers would see no difference at all... Nor would anyone else unless they book a hotel in Margot and find a wreck on their beach.
Thanks for the update. Yeah, the silver lining from some disasters is the boost
it can bring to the local economy. It also brings some people to their senses. Maybe that place on or near the waterfront was not such a good idea. :) Here in the Northeast U.S. they are buying out some homeowners in areas that were flooded and returning the area to the natural marshes that will help mitigate problems in the future.
 

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I quite literally bought the boat we have now, as an alternative to a day sailor and a waterfront property. Way, way, way cheaper too! When I get nasty bills, I try to remind myself of just the real estate taxes, yard bills, roof repairs and new boilers, all around me.

We live aboard, like we would live in a second home. If the coast is destroyed, I move. No way to move a condo.
 
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I quite literally bought the boat we have now, as an alternative to a day sailor and a waterfront property. Way, way, way cheaper too! When I get nasty bills, I try to remind myself of just the real estate taxes, yard bills, roof repairs and new boilers, all around me.

We live aboard, like we would live in a second home. If the coast is destroyed, I move. No way to move a condo.
Quite right about the second home. After Hurricane Sandy came through I found my boat 1,000 feet away from where I left her. Still floating and attached to the mooring. Storm surge lifted it off the bottom and dragged it across the harbor.:confused: Meanwhile on land there was no electricity for two weeks, no internet, no refrigeration etc... So I just remained on the boat where I had all those things including hot water for showers. Life is good on board a boat. Even after major storms create havoc on land.
 

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I quite literally bought the boat we have now, as an alternative to a day sailor and a waterfront property. Way, way, way cheaper too! When I get nasty bills, I try to remind myself of just the real estate taxes, yard bills, roof repairs and new boilers, all around me.

We live aboard, like we would live in a second home. If the coast is destroyed, I move. No way to move a condo.
Make that three. We work part time, every other week sort of. On our off weeks we live on the boat, all winter.

Retire next December (12/2015) and rent out our house.:):)
 

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Make that three. We work part time, every other week sort of. On our off weeks we live on the boat, all winter.

Retire next December (12/2015) and rent out our house.:):)
So jealous!
 
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