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I have purchased a 38' boat in Florida, and need to transport it up to NY/NJ. Had intended to have it sailed, but would now like to have it trucked. Any recommendations for cost effective but reliable trucking services?

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I have purchased a 38' boat in Florida, and need to transport it up to NY/NJ. Had intended to have it sailed, but would now like to have it trucked. Any recommendations for cost effective but reliable trucking services?

Feel free to reply offline if you prefer.
Where's the boat?
 

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I have purchased a 38' boat in Florida, and need to transport it up to NY/NJ. Had intended to have it sailed, but would now like to have it trucked. Any recommendations for cost effective but reliable trucking services?

Feel free to reply offline if you prefer.
yachtrader.com has shipping options, suggest you try one of their shippers.
Better prices in the fall. That's when all the trucks are travelling back empty after hauling a boat south for the winter cruising season.
 

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Try putting it on Uship.com and companies and individuals will bid on it. You can investigate and review the companies before and after you do anything. I have used them for motorcycle. You can see on map and prices, etc.
 

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Try these guys:
NJ Boat Hauler, All Aboard Marine Transport, Home Page

They hauled my 25' Catalina at the beginning of last season, and they were great. They came recommended by three different marinas in the area. Their prices were competitive with/better than most of their competition. The current owner sold the business to one of his employees a few years ago, who ran the business into the ground, and now the current owner is back. Before the business was sold, they were one of the largest boat movers on the East Coast. Best of all, from the description of your desired endpoint (NY/NJ area), they're going to be local at the end, so you aren't paying additional mileage fees.

Of course, if you use them, I'm going to ask for a finder's fee: a ride on your boat! :)
 

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Shipping a boat from FL to the Northeast is going to cost a small fortune.

At 38ft and depending on the width you may need multiple state permits and possibly escort vehicles if the boat is wide enough to be classified as an oversized load.
 

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Why not bring it up via the ICW? Time a problem? Hire a delivery captain.

I'd compare the cost of truck vs delivery. Don't forget decommission, recommission, haul out, packing, and broken missing stuff. For the delivery you got fuel, food, salaries, wear and tear.
 

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You will definitely have oversize permit fees in all states and escort vehicle charges in some states. Anything over 102 inches wide is oversize and that will only be able to move during the day. The truck alone won't be less than a couple bucks a mile at best.
 

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I used Joule Yacht Transport about 3 years ago to move a boat from the Boston area to Annapolis. I had a great experience with them. Excellent communication with both the company and the driver, price was good, on time, no damage, etc. They are based in Florida. No connection with them other than as a satisfied customer.

I did consider hiring a deliver skipper, but it was late in the year, the price would be about the same, I had just bought the boat and had no idea if a problem would arise that the surveyor had missed. Truck delivery just worked out to be a better option for me. But your boat is bigger and you are going a much longer distance, so your best option may be different.
 

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In the end, a deliver skipper and truck are probably going to be similar in cost and you will pay for quality in either.

The choice is between these factors, as I see it.

The delivery is probably much easier on the boat, as everything doesn't need to be dismantled and a hull sitting on a cradle for a thousand miles can't be good for it. The exception is the engine, which will get a workout.

The truck will be more reliable and much faster. You'll get her back on the water at home relatively quickly, but it can be an unbelievable PITA to coordinate all the rigging, hauling, launching, etc, etc.

Good luck.
 

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I bought a Beneteau 37 in Houston a month ago and had it trucked to Seattle by Wiseway Trucking. Jim Wise is the guy, his cell number is 352-538-4632. He was excellent in the care and communication along the way, can't say enough about him. The big problem with trucking a boat is scheduling it with a trucker. I lucked out and got this guy a week after I called him otherwise I might have been waiting a month or two for a truck to get by the area.
 

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yachtrader.com has shipping options, suggest you try one of their shippers.
Better prices in the fall. That's when all the trucks are travelling back empty after hauling a boat south for the winter cruising season.

Have to disagree a little there. When a truck goes one way, it normally has to go back the other way. There is always enough traffic going back and forth and plenty of hungry trucking companies out there.

First, get an idea what it will cost by posting on U-Ship. It does not cost a thing, and let it ride at least a few days if you choose to use one of the shippers and they will bid each other down.

Important things are insurance and bonding. Make sure you get a copy of their insurance certificate. Other things to consider are how much they will help. Some will only drive from yard to yard and putting and securing the load to the trailer is not their responsibility. Figure at least $500 each side to haul and drop the mast. Best if you can do a lot of the prep work yourself (removing radar's, bimini's, dodgers, sails, anything that will blow away.)

There are some truckers who will help on both sides to reduce the yard costs. Also, make sure you are set on both sides with a travel lift. If not, you will need to find a trucker with a Hydraulic trailer.

I prefer to work with owner operators as they have more skin in the game. Not crazy about working with shipping brokers. Thank goodness for U-Ship as we can go around them now.

If you have a dealer or factory close by either side, ask them who they use. Those are great ones to find a reverse trip. If you don't have a set time and flexible, you will get a good deal if there is a backhaul either side. Fuel is the biggest expense.
 

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I bought a boat in Seabrook, TX 2 years ago and had to get it back to New Orleans. I got quotes for a delivery captain recommended by the broker I was working with in Texas, and for trucking via the UShip site. (If you use Uship, definitely let the quotes sit a few days, because people will bid against each other.) The cost was about the same for the actual trucking or water delivery. But by the time I figured in getting the mast pulled, loading and unloading, it was easier and cheaper to have her delivered via the ICW.

Jimgo expressed concern about possible problems arising during a delivery with an unfamiliar boat. But presumably you had the boat surveyed before you bought it, which should have found the major issues. For the minor stuff, the delivery can be like an extended shakedown cruise where someone else will find the things you needed to get fixed anyway. Unless you are more experienced than the delivery captain you hire, he or she will probably be able to deal with whatever comes up at least as well as you would if it came up later, after the boat arrives. And after the delivery, the boat definitely wouldn't be "unproven" anymore.

That was my experience, anyway. Like they say - your mileage may vary.

Mark Sailor
S/V Reality
 

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I shipped mine from Palm Beach to NY 3 years ago. I used u-ship and called around. U-ship is not the cheapest. I ended up using someone else all together.
My BEST recommendation would be to call the big marinas in Florida and ask who they recommend. In addition; call the marinas in RI and Mass.
The big boys know who the good shippers are.
When cracker boy(fl) saw my shipper they groaned. Thankfully my boat came up in good shape. Thank god i was there to help place and pack.
The cheapest rates for moving a boat north are in the fall and vice versa for the spring. If you can afford to wait i would ship it north in mid october.
 

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Actually, when I researched this for my 38 foot boat, there really was not a cheapest time, although summer can be a little more expensive than the rest of the year because fuel is a little more expensive and winter was riskier.

The best rates are if you can piggy-back with another delivery. Boat haulers are looking to haul boats on all legs of the trip. They actually carried another smaller boat on the rig for part of the trip down here (Maine to Annapolis) and then picked up another boat for the round trip back.

It cut roughly half of their quote for shipping. I had to give them flexibility on the shipping window so they could put the loads together. Beam and height are big determinants. Beam controls whether they need a chase vehicle and have to get wide load permits. At 12 feet and the route they followed, we did not need the chase car.

More height would have given a different route, and more beam or a different route would have added a lot for the chase car.

Lastly, the folks I worked with were great. They used a hydraulic lift saving the cost of loading and unloading, and they loaded and secured everything, saving a lot of costs at the shipping point. Had a yard do most of the commissioning but I did a lot of the recommissioning myself. It was a 2-3 weeks of hard work.

Jeff
 
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