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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there;
I've been reading that the cost of a survey is usually borne by the buyer, yet I sometimes see ads for used boats claiming recent survey done, and so I wonder why the seller would be in posssesion of the survey? Someone flipping the boat, or, is it common practice in order to reduce the cost of multiple surveys that the prospective buyer offers to split the cost with the seller?. A survey in the possession of a buyer who didn't purchase is pretty much a useless piece of paper, but could be helpful to the seller for the next prospective buyer (provided survey is favourable or repairs have been documented as being completed), or for renewing insurance perhaps?.
Also, if a seller has a survey, how recent should it be to be considered trustworthy by the prospective buyer- for insurance purposes and to save commisioning a new survey?

Thanks (sorry for the muddled wording)
don
 

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It all depends. Sometimes people get a survey and arent willing to fix whatever is wrong. But you might be. I just bought a boat where the guy had bought it a year before, fixed everything on the survey and then found out he needed major surgery and so had to sell the boat. I did my own survey anyway but having the old one played a part in getting me to the point where I made an offer.

And as for how recent is recent enough to just accept it, how long does it take to run aground?
 

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Glad I found Sailnet
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I'd do my own survey anyway. You need a surveyor who is working for you.
 

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AEOLUS II
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Many surveyors consider their work intellectual property and non-transferable.

Would I trust it??

Depends.

If it was a lot of boat or a lot of money, NO!!
 

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might be an insurance survey. they are much less detailed than a purchase survey. they verify the boat isn't sinking or about to blow up and is still in the possession of the owner.
i had a survey offered to me on a boat i was looking at. the survey was about useless
insurance surveys don't usually require a haulout so there is no inspection of the hull at all
purchase survey costs about 3 or 4 times what an insurance survey would IIRC
 

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Charlie
I should have been more specific. Insurance companies often ask for this cheapo survey every 5 years...after the full pre-purchase survey initially.

wood boats are another whole kettle of fish for sure
 

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Xort is exactly right on that. Also brokers have been known to work with surveyors to give a good survey to make the boat more saleable. I was once asked by my broker to have his surveyor do this.
Get your own surveyor always.
 

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When I sell my current boat, I'll be happy to let prospective buyers see the most recent survey along with all other documentation that shows that I was a conscientious owner. But I would never encourage a buyer not to get his own survey; that's the mark of an untrustworthy seller.
 

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The money your own surveyor costs will usually is often recouped in the difference between the final purchase price and the pre-survey offer (unless it is a really good deal.) Additionally the surveyor will give some additional advice on what he believes could be upgrade.
There are some people I have met who had a LOT of experience working on boats who felt they could adequately do their own survey but the "expert" opinion from a third party adds weight to any negotiations.
 

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Telstar 28
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Get your own survey... as GreatWhite points out, they usually pay for themselves.
 

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survey integrety @!

I'm reading some notes here about bias survey , from the" Brokers surveyor" as I just read above a few post and getting upset a bit ...

it is pretty resentful statement ..if you deal with a broker who has "his own" surveyor .. well he should not be a broker at all ..

I'm dealing with all sort of boats, wood , glass , steel , and deal with several surveyor , and not one of them "good for me" surveyor ..
you get a list of surveyor YOU the buyer pick the one .. and it should be always independent as it should be !!
and yes you always should do your own survey .. even so sometimes we can offer a recent survey (surveyor charge for it of course) , or the seller depend..
if the findings extensive and match your concerns it is your call , but a rule should be get a survey your own..
 

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In my boat shopping experience over the last year, I've been offered several surveys to look over. They were always offered as a starting point to see any potential problems or benefits to the vessels I'm looking at. They were never offered as a document to use for purchasing the boat. Perhaps I'm just lucky, but the Brokers I've delt with just assumed that I'd be getting my own surveyor when it got to that point in the sell.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi again, and thanks for all the helpful advice! My main point is to avoid the prospect of spending many hundreds of dollars having boats surveyed that looked good to me (the buyer), only to find them full of hidden surprises. Sorry to drift off topic, but I was reading the postings about getting a moisture meter as one way to screen out one hidden surprise- namely water issues, avoiding unnecessary surveys, so maybe a pinless one (don't want to be poking needles into them!) is a worthy investment of a couple of hundred $ ?? Or are water issues in the core a common concern?
...don
 

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Campbdon-

That's kind of why I wrote the Boat Inspection Trip Tips post. If you haven't read it... you need to. :rolleyes:

Hi again, and thanks for all the helpful advice! My main point is to avoid the prospect of spending many hundreds of dollars having boats surveyed that looked good to me (the buyer), only to find them full of hidden surprises. Sorry to drift off topic, but I was reading the postings about getting a moisture meter as one way to screen out one hidden surprise- namely water issues, avoiding unnecessary surveys, so maybe a pinless one (don't want to be poking needles into them!) is a worthy investment of a couple of hundred $ ?? Or are water issues in the core a common concern?
...don
 

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When I had my last boat for sale one of the most common questions was "Do you have a survey?"

As a survey is required every five years in our area by insurance company and is one of the first things you have to do after buying a boat most boats typically have a survey 5 years old or less.

Since these are not for selling purposes but for valuation purposes they are for the new owner's benefit. It usually states condition of hull, rigging and age of equipment and sails, instrumentation and if it is working. teh ones I had done were pretty basic but do list age and condition of sails, instruments and deck moisture information (listed moisture around chainplates and cockpit floor).

When I decided to sell my last boat I scanned the old survey (was dated after all) and provided a link. If noting else it listed deficiencies I was informed of at time of purchase which could be compared against the work that was performed over the time of ownership.

A good starting place before taking the trip to look at the boat I guess.

Mike
 
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