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Courtney the Dancer
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One went overboard and a another went in to help rescue him. Neither could get back on board due to the cold water and had to be rescued. The interesting thing for me was that three other crew members tried for 45 minutes to hoist them back aboard the 40' sailboat and couldn't do it. No info. on what gear was available on board, but I'm sure there will be more information released soon. They're both lucky to be alive after that long in the 45+- degree F water here, most only last about 30.

Pacific Northwest Boating News: 2 rescued from waters of Shilshole Bay | Three Sheets Northwest
 

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Man, that's a LONG time in cold water. It will be interesting to see what equipment they were using/trying to use.
 

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Lifesling is on my super short list when I splash my boat in the not too distant future. I am sure glad to hear they made it I dive in that water and its brutal.
 

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Look up Lifesling videos on YouTube. As you'll see, they aren't bomb-proof, especially if the MOB is a slug due to injury or cold.
 

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Having been a overboard victim but still tethered it took several crew to get me back aboard. I dislocated my shoulder and broke my leg in the process of leaving the boat and couldn't do a lot to get myself back on board. At the time I weighed about 165.
I grew up on a horse farm. Want to get an idea, grab the corner of a 100lb bag of grain and see how far you can move it. Now get it wet.
W/O a swim platform getting someone back on board is very difficult. While "life sling" will get you MOB back to the boat how many of us have the block and tackle "life sling" shows to get the MOB back in the boat.
Jim
 

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Bring On The Wind
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Maybe I'm naive, but everytime I read a post like this I wonder if they had a stern ladder and if not why they didn't have a rope ladder for such an emergency. A life sling is great, but if the people on board are unable to hoist them aboard something as elementary as a rope ladder and a tether would have helped.
 

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Courtney the Dancer
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Cat- after just a few minutes (5-10?) in that cold water you wouldn't be able to pull yourself up any kind of ladder, you would just be dead weight.
 

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If they've been in the water too long, hypothermic people won't be able to climb a ladder. The best solution I've seen is a canvas triangle that you attach one side along the toerail (tie off two corners to stanchion bases, for example) and then bring the victim alongside with the canvas under him and the third corner outboard of him. Attach a tackle or halyard to the third corner, or take a line from it to a winch, and pull. The parbuckle created by the canvas provides 2:1 lift, in addition to whatever you add with a tackle or winch. The victim is held snugly against the hull until he's deposited on deck. You don't need gorillas to get him aboard, you (hopefully) don't need to go into the water to get him into the parbuckle, and it shouldn't take 45 minutes.
 

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Nice concept in calm conditions assuming you had this piece of fabric.
BTW who's going to get the outside corner under the MOB and secure a halyard?
Jim
 

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W/O a swim platform getting someone back on board is very difficult. While "life sling" will get you MOB back to the boat how many of us have the block and tackle "life sling" shows to get the MOB back in the boat.
Jim
Such a 'handy-billy' is certainly nice to have, and will have numerous uses on any boat, but shouldn't necessarily be required to get a MOB back on deck...

I feel very strongly that every halyard or lift going up the mast should be of a length sufficient to reach the water, with several feet to spare. On my boat, my alternatives (not including the main halyard, assuming the main would be hoisted) would include a 2:1 spinnaker halyard, a spare main halyard, a trysail halyard to port, and spinnaker/whisker pole lift... For the 2 not equipped with snap shackles, a handy Wichard asymetrical hook lives at the base of the mast, to be fixed to the screw pin shackles on the main, spare, or trysail shackles... Of course, the handy billy/block and tackle would be my first choice of gear to reach for...

The possibility of having to employ a halyard for a MOB recovery is yet another reason why I'm opposed to leading lines aft, and believe all halyards or pole/topping lifts should remain at the mast... With a shorthanded crew, or a pair of Mom & Pop cruisers where only one person remains aboard, having to get the halyard shackle to the person in the water, on a boat where the halyards are led aft to the cockpit, could become VERY problematic...
 

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Even using the the 6:1 tackle supplied by Lifesling was very, very difficult for my gal to haul my dead arse out of the water on a calm day in a practice session....
 

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landofrainandgray
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One has to wonder if alcohol was involved-the report states this happened at 3:30 a.m. a mile offshore which places them approximately in the shipping/ferry channel.

They are lucky to be alive, no doubt. We've taken the Lifesling course, on our own boat, and have rigged the lifesling tackle to get someone aboard using the main halyard. It's challenging in the best of circumstances. It wouldn't be fun trying it with a half moon vis and temps hovering at 30 degrees. Yikes!
 

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Glad they are OK.. strange story, though, esp time of day (night?) this time of year...
 

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If they've been in the water too long, hypothermic people won't be able to climb a ladder.
I treated someone with hypothermia on an early spring backpacking trip. He slipped on a snow bank and ended up in a deep puddle of melted snow water.

We pitched a tent in the sun, rolled out a sleeping bag, and put a lit stove in the tent to warm it up. This guy didn't have the dexterity to remove his backpack, let alone his wet clothes. It is alarming how much hypothermia can sap someone of strength, dexterity and an ability to rationalize the danger they are in.
 

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I think you guys are missing the point that with a ladder the person wouldn't be in the water long enough t get hypothermia. I have swam in these waters in every month of the year an never been to cold to climb out
 

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I used to teach sailing in cold Scottish waters, the first 4 hours of the week long course were MOB..."how to get the skipper back!"

Jon is right...midships with halyard is probably best..off the stern in a seaway would be very dangerous.

The report in Raindog's post should be mandatory reading for all on boats.

We practice MOB and recovery a minimum of twice a year. In cold water we put the man in the dinghy and lift him from there.

We have two crew coming on board for a Pacific crossing the MOB/safety training will take two days.

Our on deck crew wear personal AIS transmitters that ring an alarm on the chartplotter when activated. Range is about 3 miles and the autopilot will even navigate back to their position. PFD's with strong crotch straps mandatory at night and in any kind of weather.

Practice. practice. practice but I know many cruisers who have never done a MOB drill! I recently gave lessons to a couple who had been sailing together for 5 yrs without even discussing the methods.
 

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God, that must be such a nightmare. For all the stories you hear of people being washed overboard, never to be seen again, I can't imagine getting the boat back to the MOB, only for them to die by the boat because you can't get them out of the water.
 

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...every halyard or lift going up the mast should be of a length sufficient to reach the water, with several feet to spare...
The possibility of having to employ a halyard for a MOB recovery is yet another reason why I'm opposed to leading lines aft, and believe all halyards or pole/topping lifts should remain at the mast... With a shorthanded crew, or a pair of Mom & Pop cruisers where only one person remains aboard, having to get the halyard shackle to the person in the water, on a boat where the halyards are led aft to the cockpit, could become VERY problematic...
+1.

And a halyard too short for its shackle to reach the water can be quickly lengthened by bending a dock line or any other suitable line to the bitter end of the halyard.
 

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Asleep at the wheel
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+1.

And a halyard too short for its shackle to reach the water can be quickly lengthened by bending a dock line or any other suitable line to the bitter end of the halyard.
Not always. My halyards run inside the mast; any knot is going to be too big to fit. And bending on an line on the other end doesn't make much sense, unless a sling or other lifting device is attached to the line.
 
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