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Sounds like a great trip. Here's some restaurant suggestions......

Block Island. Love Eli's. It's a small place on a side street off the main drag in Old Harbor. Naturally, you'll go to the Oar, I think it against the law of nature not to.

Bristol. For Italian go to Robertos, excellent!! German to Redlefsons, very good but only a few actual German dishes. Pub casual, then Aidens is a must!!

Dutch Harbor. As I said in your other post, walk the one mile over to Jamestown. Try the new Simpaticos. Great atmosphere. Fish's is over the top, expensive but good, more formal, if that's your speed. Spinnakers ice cream shop is a must! There is also a taco stand at the Dutch Harbor marina. It's beyond belief good, even breakfast burritos.
 

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I'm not going to get preachy, but you really should have reliable overnight ground tackle for a trip like this. Sept is a much slower time of year, so you should find moorings, but what if you don't. The pressure to arrive early to be sure I got a mooring would take the buzz off sailing for me. Many of the places you're intending to visit have very good anchorages (Block, Dutch, Bristol for example)
 

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If it were me (and it is not), rather than visit Battle Ship Cove, I would head down the Sakonnet to either Fogland, or Third Beach. You could stop at the Boat House restaurant in Tiverton along the way. I have only visited Fall River by land, but I don't find the industrial waterfront appealing.
This is a good recommendation, just be sure you can get under the new 24/138 bridge.

Third beach is often rolly, but you can dinghy into the beach, if you like that sort of thing. Love Fogland! Peaceful, huge anchorage, no moorings, no marina, beautiful. No where to go ashore, so good place to plan to BBQ.

Glad to hear the OP is buying overnight ground tackle. Opens so many more options and bailouts. Highly recommend a new-gen: Rocna, Manson Supreme or Mantus. You'll never buy another, I'm sure.
 

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You bought a decent size danforth for your boat, but there are a couple of things you should keep in mind.

First, they can be tough to set in some conditions. The good new is, you'll find appropriate conditions for the danforth in several of the places you'll go. They are much better with a heavy chain. I'm going out on a limb and thinking you didn't buy all chain, but the first 20-30 feet off the anchor are important. It holds the shank down in low-moderate winds and provides chafe protection at the anchor connection.

Be sure to use proper technique. This is what we do. Add the distance from the top of your bow to the depth of the anchorage at high tide, not just when you arrive. You will ultimately want to let out 7 times this distance in rode. The more the merrier, if you have more and there is room to swing. When you get the boat stopped, bow into the wind, drop 2 times that measurement. Wait for the wind to blow you back and you see the bow begin to straitened back into the wind, as you likely have fallen off the wind while drifting. When the bow starts to come around, you know you've straightened the rode, so let another 2 times out. Again, wait for the bow to come around. With 4 times out now, you should be able to get a set by puting the engine in idle reverse. All you're doing at this stage is seeing if you can bury the flukes. If you seem to stop (check a fix spot on shore), put the engine back in neutral and continue the above procedure of dropping 2 times, until you get out all you want. By the way, you can tie threads into a three strand rode at whatever interval you like to know how much you've payed out. Once your 7x or more is out, put the engine in reverse at high rpms. You want to know you're not moving like this. If you are set, it's cocktail time. If not, it's do over time. If you have to start over, try to relocate a little bit, if you can, as conditions can vary greatly in short distances.

If you have a smartphone, get an anchor alarm. You should not bet your life or boat on one, but they can be extraordinary peace of mind. The good ones will show your location graphically and draw a persistence line of everywhere you swing. In any wind at all, you will swing side to side, which can make it harder to tell if you're dragging. The persistence line should show you drawing an arch that isn't moving backwards.

Finally, the bummer. A danforth has a really hard time resetting itself and not considered a great overnight hook. If there is a good wind that shifts 180 degrees, it will pull out and need to reset. Best to anchor with a danforth, when you don't expect the wind direction to change by more than 60 degs to either side or so. If you do expect more wind change, you can set an alarm and go up on deck. The easiest way to reset, if you have the room, is to fire up the motor, put her in idle reverse and hope she grabs. If she does, up the rpms to dig it in. If she doesn't, you have to pull it up and start over.

Enjoy the practice.
 

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I have an iPhone and iPad. If you're droid/etc, you'll need someone else to recommend. Just be sure to get one with a graphic persistence line. I particularly like Boat Monitor (running right now), but last I checked, you could no longer buy it in the US Apple store. Don't know why. I've also used Anchor Watch and liked it. I recently downloaded Boat Sentry, but haven't tested it yet.

Your road/chain combo is pretty good and having to haul by hand is a definite factor! Let me know if I can be of any further local help. Have a great trip!!
 
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