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If you have to ask, you may not be able to afford it.

I have put more than I paid for the boat back into the boat over the past 10 years of ownership.
Have you crunched the numbers on what it cost for the last decade to own your boat? My boat did not have a dodger or any significant electronics so my $12k/year did not include any of these expenses.

What i find interesting is all the NE people talk of bottom paint each year. Is that a factor of once it is out of the water might as well paint the bottom or is there something in the waters up there requiring more frequent bottom paint?
 

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Concerning bottom paint, on the Great Lakes we can use VC-17. It's a hard paint but easily applied. It only takes a couple of quarts to do a coat on our Catalina 350. It goes on thin so it makes sense to just do a coat yearly before the boat goes into the water. Our other boat (a Seaward 25) had ablative paint on it when I got it, so I've stuck with that. I used to do it every other year when we had it in the water all season. It took a gallon of the thicker ablative paint to do that boat.

Concerning fouling, zebra mussels and slime are about the worst of it here. Sail the boat, and the build up isn't bad at all, not like salt water.
 

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changing the engine oil every 100 hrs - actually change the oil & filter after 100 hours, then change the oil again after the next 10 hours.
Is there a typo in there? Not sure why you'd change oil after 10 hours.

Our method....... Oil and filter at Spring commissioning. Change just the oil mid-season. Change just the oil, prior to going on the hard. We average about 100 hrs of engine time per season (much less this year.... more sailing with more flexibility).
 
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What i find interesting is all the NE people talk of bottom paint each year. Is that a factor of once it is out of the water might as well paint the bottom or is there something in the waters up there requiring more frequent bottom paint?
Depends on the bottom paint one chooses too. We used a hybrid paint that loses it's effectiveness when out of the water. I'm pretty sure it even has a window in which it must be splashed, after application too. I do a rough sand and single coat each season and never have any build up. Never get anything but slime either.
 

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The advantages of spending the winter in the water:
-Less expensive - less than 1/2 the price of hauling and storing on land
-I can put the boat in the slip any time I like and I can go sailing in the spring as soon as I am ready.
-I think boats do better floating in water than sitting on stands

Barry
Another wet store advantage is the ease of access... to the boat.. you and taking things on and off...10' ladders are handy for this.

It seems that only in colder climates where there is a boating season do people think that if they are not boating the boat does not belong in the water. Tell that to the people who fish for a living.
 

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Is there a typo in there? Not sure why you'd change oil after 10 hours.

Our method....... Oil and filter at Spring commissioning. Change just the oil mid-season. Change just the oil, prior to going on the hard. We average about 100 hrs of engine time per season (much less this year.... more sailing with more flexibility).
I typically do the oil and filter change at the beginning of winter store... and then change at 75 or so hours of use.
 

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The engine has a drain hose mounted on the forward end of the oil pan. The engine is canted aft. The result is that it is impossible to drain all of the oil without dropping the pan. There is about 3/4 of a quart left in the pan. Changing the oil twice, with a short interval between changes to mix the oils, enables me to remove 97% of the oil with 110hrs of use.
Got it, that is a pain with canted engines. Mine too, but our engine has a second dip stick in the back (a rare +1 for Volvo). I wonder if a sacrificial oil change, with a cheap oil would be an option. You only need to run the engine enough to mix it up, not necessarily any amount of time. Then re-top with the good stuff. Your plan makes sense, tho.
 
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Depends on the bottom paint one chooses too. We used a hybrid paint that loses it's effectiveness when out of the water. I'm pretty sure it even has a window in which it must be splashed, after application too. I do a rough sand and single coat each season and never have any build up. Never get anything but slime either.
Got it, I remember that when i had a boat in Lake Pontchartrain. There were two types of bottom paint, one for trailerable and one for being permanently in the water. It also makes sense in the situation where boats are pulled each winter. A major part of the bottom paint cost on the West Coast is the crane and stands.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
This has all been very valuable info for somebody trying to be responsible with a large family purchase. Thank you!

If you have to ask, you may not be able to afford it.
Since there was no indication, I'm gonna be charitable and assume this was meant as an ironic joke.
Because only a pompous ass would say something like this otherwise.
 

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"If you have to ask, you may not be able to afford it."
:oops:That got your panties in a twist?

I am truly sorry that I tried to help you understand the ongoing costs of owning a sailboat. Therefore, my contributions to this thread have been deleted.

Welcome to "Ignore"
[Edited to add] Please add me to your Ignore List and we can both live richer, more fulfilling lives. 😃
 

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I'm reading through this thread.
Owner of a 32 foot "cruiser/racer" on an inland lake (yes that matters).
I'm in the water year round, so I'm sure that is a factor.
Probably about $2000/year in slip fee.
I just hauled, bottom painted, waxed topsides, and put back in water. Was a quick round trip thing (oh new prop put on), I think I paid $1200 for all that.
bought lots of running rigging, new bilge pump, batteries, hatch, I'm probably at $2500 for the rest of it.

Now Jephotog likely has his number pretty correct for me, but I'm looking at a boat that didn't get some of this stuff addressed for several years.

I figure I'm probably another year or two of crazy spend like that then I'll be on Jephotog's low side or below.
I found someone to send me used sails (racing sails with only a couple seasons on them), for 1/10th the cost of new.

So I'm finding frugal alternatives.
 

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I'm reading through this thread.
Owner of a 32 foot "cruiser/racer" on an inland lake (yes that matters).
I'm in the water year round, so I'm sure that is a factor.
Probably about $2000/year in slip fee.
I just checked the math. I was in San Diego. Current slip fees run $5000 for the cheap seats, $10,000/year for a prime slip. I would guess including a high rent neighborhood the cost of owning a boat would be closer to $20k/year, minimum $15k if you factor in keeping up with modern electronics.

I would consider any significant outlays in the first few years for new sails, rigging, electronics, which could be considered part of the cost of purchase. If you got a good deal on a boat but felt it needed/wanted those.
 

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Jephotog - the world doesn't use CA bucks. Thankfully.
The marinas - the only thing NOT on fire in CA right now - sorry insensitive I know.
 

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I'd download manuals for everything on your boat from water pump to winches. Each manual will have a maintenance section. Create a spreadsheet and keep to it. Mine is 104 items.
 

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Jephotog - the world doesn't use CA bucks. Thankfully.
The marinas - the only thing NOT on fire in CA right now - sorry insensitive I know.
But San Diego is extra special. I was shocked to compare San Francisco Bay's slip fees to find out they were cheaper than San Diego. In SD you are competing with everyone who wants to live somewhere warmer or colder from all over the country. A $40k boat with $20k a year is a way more approachable than Socal real estate.

Still, you can reasonably expect $6k/year for moorage anywhere on the west coast. I would guess the cost of boat ownership can vary between $5-20k/year depending on where you live and how much work you do yourself.
 

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Regarding the cost to tie up a boat, I am paying a total of approx 2K per year, private YC (total for all moorage fees, dues, and etc) , in Oregon. If you are shopping around for a place to move to where you can sail, consider Portland. Of course wages are traditionally lower here, too!
:(
 
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