SailNet Community banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Jeanneau 57
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
Reaction score
870
...The majority of cruising boats built until about ten years ago had the capacity of straightening themselves once they were capsized, and this was considered a priority by good designers. Today racing boats, thanks to their width and shape seem to behave like catamarans or dinghies: once upside down they stay like that...
Modern production boats still have to prove that they are self-righting, otherwise they will not get certified. I don't know where you got that information, but it is incorrect.

CE certification process uses ISO standard 12217 to produce a STIX value (stability index), which is used for certification, this in addition to the AVS (Angle of Vanishing Stability) often shown in graphical form for each boat. Additional requirements are made for offshore racing boats, these can be found at RORC Safety and Stability
If the boat is stable inverted and not a catamaran it will not get certified (or used) for offshore work. While there are one-off specialty racers that might be stable inverted, it does not apply to production boats and certainly not to this proven offshore racer. Unfortunately the picture from the cargo vessels seems to show that the keel is missing, and that changes the righting formula.
 

· Registered
Jeanneau 57
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
Reaction score
870
The Fastnet race of 1979 with it's high loss of boats and life, and to a lesser extent the Sydney-Hobart race of 1998, forced manufacturers, designers and the race organizations to rethink stability and survivability. While I agree that modern hull forms are very wide and flat and that manufacturers are playing close to the limits of AVS and STIX in order to produce all that interior volume (my boat is included in that group of hulls), they do know their engineering. Classic hull shapes and keels will generally self-right quicker and might arguably be safer at sea, but modern production boats aren't going to turn turtle and stay inverted for long.
 

· Registered
Jeanneau 57
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
Reaction score
870
longroute - we could take this to another thread, since it would constitute thread drift; but I have a Jeanneau 57 which is only 2 years old. All boats are built to a price point, balancing many engineering factors and cost. This is my third Jeanneau and from my point of view the boats are built sufficiently well and for a price I'm willing to pay. But I'm a cruiser and not a racer, although I was at the Antigua Sailing Week this year and met at least one of the missing crew.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top