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Having read carefully the news it seems to me that it’s a big mistake to have suspended the search. It’s likely they are drifting in a raft, and there are no evident arguments against this possibility.

Another personal consideration. I’m not an expert and we don’t know the exact reason of this shipwreck but I cannot help but think of the following:

The majority of cruising boats built until about ten years ago had the capacity of straightening themselves once they were capsized, and this was considered a priority by good designers. Today racing boats, thanks to their width and shape seem to behave like catamarans or dinghies: once upside down they stay like that.

If they will not be found we will never know if that is what happened but anyhow I think it’s an important issue for a debate here.

What do you think?

Donato
 

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Modern production boats still have to prove that they are self-righting, otherwise they will not get certified. I don't know where you got that information, but it is incorrect.
I didn't get that information anywhere, it was just a supposition of mine. I thought my wording suggested that.

I've seen some racing boats (I have in mind some Jeanneau models...) which are so wide and flat and a with a small deckhouse which - in my view - make the self-righting very difficult if not impossible. I'm glad that you clarified this doubt of mine.

Thanks for your reply.
 

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I discovered after I sent my reply that you have a Jeanneau boat :)-), which year?

I have a friend who owns a Jeanneau (about 11 m.) built I think around the ’80 or maybe the ’90. I like the kind and my friend assures me it’s a good boat. He sailed extensively in the Mediterranean with her, so I think we can trust his judgement. Few years ago he was thinking to buy a new and bigger one and went to a local Boat show. He could afford the price of a bigger one (same brand) that he saw there but after visiting and inspecting the boat more closely he changed his mind. He realized that they had economized about the employed materials and had a distinct impression of weakness. He told me that while he was in her interior he suddenly lost his balance and to sustain himself he grabbed the table: it remained in his hand… it was just secured to the floor with few small screws. He decided to keep his old Jeanneau instead…

Probably the shipyard might have mended all these kind of weak points in the newer models but only after all the complaining they received from their customers. Do you think that this is a responsible behaviour?
One has the fear that the same thing happens with the racing boats: they improve their models only after some tragedy has occurred… that is putting their customers skin at stake.
The regattas you are quoting are an example of this.
Do you remember Isabelle Autissier shipwreck? She lost her fin keel with only 20 knots of wind…
And it seems that also Cheeki Rafiki has lost her keel.

Thinking about that I dare doubt about your statement:

“Classic hull shapes and keels will generally self-right quicker and might arguably be safer at sea, but modern production boats aren't going to turn turtle and stay inverted for long.”

Not all the manufacturers are the same of course… she was a Beneteau, another manufacturer which is renowned for economizing on the materials.

Anyway I'm sure you can give a better assessment about this matter which intrigues me and that's is why I'm continuing this thread. I'm really interested to hear the opinion of a Jeanneau owner.

D.
 
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