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Bluewater Cruiser Hunter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to buy a bluewater cruiser and wondering if any opinion of the bastardized Robert Perry Union Cutter? Thanks.
 

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I researched these boats and looked at a few. Without looking at my files on them this is what I recall:

Great old boats...but:

All the ones I looked at had soft decks. Teak screwed to fiberglass is a great idea for the first owner but down the road it is trouble.

Soft cabin sides. These were the result of the portlights leaking.

One had a wooden mast, which would not bother me but it had been recently painted.

Generally all Union owners seemed less than interested in their boats. I got the feeling that the boat was part of a dream that they didn't want to let go (common with all boats but with the Unions it seemed like 100%)

The painted mast was one attempt to hide stuff but other Unions had used similar methods to sell the boat. One claimed to have rebuilt the engine when it was clearly just a repair and a poor one at that.

Then there are all the old boat stuff. Owner thought the DECCA system was worth cutting out half the bulkhead and seemed to think it increased value.

Most subsystems needed repair/replacement.
 

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Bluewater Cruiser Hunter
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Union cutter info

Thanks for the info. Would you happen to know of any current owners in WA state? I'd love to get a feel for one personally. Shay
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Latest issue of Good Old Boat has an article on the Union 36. Worth reading.
 

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Do not know of any owners. I think there were two for sale in WA when I was looking. One made my short list but lost because it needed too much work.
 

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Architeuthis is spot on with the decks on most U36s. These boats are now approaching 30 years of age and with screwed down teak decks youll find that the screws, especially at the butt ends of the strakes, have 'sawn' loose from the FRG, the 'thiokol caulk' under the teak will be 'shot', and the 'core' will be loaded with water. Such decks can be rebuilt but its a horrendous time consuming job and not all that inexpensive even as a DIY project. Unless such decks were constantly maintained by removing the OEM screws and replacing them with larger diameter (shoulder) screws such decks will 'usually' be sodden.
Ditto, Tayana, Baba, etc.

Also most of these boats have quite inferior 'metallurgy' and very rot/corrosion vulnerable chainplate bases. These (all) were 'high maintenance' boats and most owners 'didnt'.
 

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Bluewater Cruiser Hunter
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Portland, OR

If you are interested in a Union still I can give you info on the one for sale in Portland, OR. We spent over 2 hours on her last summer. We've moved on since we've decided we want to sail more and work on the boat less. Good luck!
 

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seeker of wonder
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Thanks for the info. Would you happen to know of any current owners in WA state? I'd love to get a feel for one personally. Shay
If you're in Washington state, I'd actually steer you toward a MUCH better 36...and built (crafted would be a better word) right in Port Townsend, Wa.

Cape George 36 cutter











 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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A couple of years back the Wombet and I very nearly bought a Passport 42 (Stan Huntingford not Bob Perry). Deck was pretty much shot, black iron fuel tanks were rotten, holding tank also gone to god. One bulkhead had a rotten base under the floorboards and the interior needed a complete re varnish. Electricals had been "improved" over the years and were now a complete mess, much of the electronic equipment was at the end of its useable life. . All in all about what you would expect for a Taiwanese / Chinese boat of that era. OK so not a Union but it was of the same vintage and origin and this was a boat built for Passport.

The Unions, for what they are , are nice boats overall but for my money given their origin and issues like decks and the rest would be best avoided unless an absolutely top notch example of the breed.
 

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I have got a Union 36, from 1977.
The decks do leak. I just live with it.
The chainplates leak also. I plan to catch the water drips and duct them to the bilge (next project).
The tanks were poor, particularly the water tank that was stainless but welded with wire rods (so it leaked like a sieve). That one really stung me.
The stern tube leaked horribly.
I fixed all that.
It is still a good ship, and good in a big sea.
And undeniably pretty.
And I am keeping it, now 19 years on.

And yes, perhaps the Cape George 36 is a better constructed ship. It looks better constructed. Here is one....

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/197...sland---Shown-by-Appointment/WA/United-States

....but it is two years older than my Union Polaris 36.

And three times the price.

.




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There are two nice fesh water unions down in Chicago. One a 36 and one a 32.
You can find them on Yachtworld. I am going to check out a 38 Shannon in the same yard and will report if they meet the "standard" of excellence. Alot of great boats up here to be had at a discount this winter season. Plus no snow to speak of , yet, so a good time to look.
tom3215
 
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