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After an active summer of sailing I find my jib sheets often double back on themselves and jam in their blocks. Seems that they have developed a bit of built up twist from all the wrap unwrap and rewrap of tacking. Anyone have a quick way of taking out the twist? I have considered taking the sheets off and dragging behind boat while motoring or main only but wondered if there is a less intrusive way. Thanks...
 

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Master Mariner
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Turning them end for end on a regular basis, might help.
 
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Corsair 24
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sta set x or something? I heard figure 8´s will cure the twist

laying them in loops doesnt work so well...(like you would traditionally with a twist each loop)

I know my standard sta set can kink easily too
 

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How about tying one end to the main halyard, and hoisting it up. Let it hang for a bit. Or tie a weight to the bottom to help it unwind.
 

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What's happened is that the twist of the individual yarns has slipped due to excess strain on the rope; and, as the rope repeatedly strains then relaxes then the entire rope also becomes cumulatively shorter (and a wee bit fatter) - called 'hysterisis' ... and all the individual yarns inside the rope are doing the same 'shorter and fatter as well as increasingly twisting'.

For a temporary fix: You can heat soak the rope in (not to exceed) 175°F water, then quickly strain it back to its original length. I quickly tie the hot rope between a tree and my trailer hitch and 'pull' with my vehicle, then let cool while its still 'stretched'. But, there will still be some twist remaining due to the residual 'shortening and fattening' of the small yarns. However, this rope in further application of high stress/strain will continue to get shorter / fatter / twisted. What you purchased is a highly unstable rope and most of the current boat stores sell it (hint: its the cheapest you can buy) !!!!!

The best solution is to purchase a more expensive grade of more stable line and the shortening and fattening and the ultimate 'twisting' will be much less. In the high grades of line such will probably be unnoticeable for years and years of 'heavy' service. You must realize however that any rope made from twisted yarns and used 'heavily' will eventually get fatter, shorter, twisted ... its just a matter of time and how many time that rope gets stretched out; the higher quality of the rope, the longer it takes.

Rx: buy a much higher grade of line which is stronger in breaking strength (even if its diameter is one or two 'sizes' smaller); and then, dont use it to anywhere near that breaking strength .... for less 'hysterisis': shortening/fattening/twisting that is residual after repeated episodes heavy stress/strain.

:)
 

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rich can you give the rest of the hint by pm? jajaja
 

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Damn, that seems like a lot of work for a line that's just going to have the problem again.

Sounds like a reason to upgrade! :p
 

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Freedom isn't free
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tie them to a cleat aft, drag them behind you in the water for a while, lay them untensioned on the deck to dry.

Always store them in figure 8s...
Common problem for sta-set, and sometimes sta-setX... You buy cheap line for genoa sheets (and I did too, so not blaming here)... you have to replace nearly yearly.

But then they get so fuzzy after a season of use, it's almost necessary... maybe the high grade stuff lasts longer... its double (or triple) the price, I hope it lasts more than twice as long.
 
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