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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The monsoon has changed in the Indian Ocean which means that the pirates can operate again - in the summer sea conditions are two boisterous. The number of successful attacks is down in the last couple of years, but largely due to armed personnel on ships. The link below is the official advice to yachtsmen. I noticed that there is a slight change since we went through last year. The 'no-go' southern boundary has moved from 12*S to 10*S. Longitudinal extent is unchanged.

Edit: Sorry, forgot the link.

http://www.mschoa.org/docs/public-documents/yachting-piracy-bulletin-final-version.pdf?sfvrsn=2
 
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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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thanks for the update.. as it gets harder and harder to be a pirate, they are going to get more desperate. They had best watch they do not attact some real military attention
 

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Administrator
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They can pick and choose... or just collect everyone for each yacht and be away before the navy can help.





Skiffs are not small!

Not only are they quite big, they are very fast and extremely difficult to see even in these flat conditions.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Discussion Starter #5
I think that the risks are even worse for yachts now than before because the freighters are much harder targets now. When we crossed the Indian last year, south of 12S, we saw a couple of ships whose AIS destinations were, 'Armed guards on board'.
 
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