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Old enough to know better
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Chall03, Nice to have you on board. There are enough Boreals out there now that I don't know everyone. PM me sometime, I'd love to hear more of your boat.

First, on the list that John made. He does update it when he gets info on a boat he thinks should be on the list. He had a client that was interested in a Boreal and contacted my wife Tracy about how we liked our Boreal. We also met with John and Amada for a brief visit down in Panama and talked some more about the Boreal and that was a great visit.

Outbound, The mystery of owning an aluminum boat is now gone as we have had ours for a couple of years now. All the worry about corrosion have past. We have left the boat on the hard in Panama as a precaution to a bad marina. Not that the marina we are at has a bad problem but just in case a boat with bad power moved in beside us. There are plenty of aluminum boats still being left at a slip unattended for the summer season. Most of these aluminum boats are from Europe and the Europeans are more confident that their boat will not corrode if left at a slip. In Europe most marinas have lousy power and they never seem to have a problem. So I guess what I'm saying is this type of boat is a lot tougher than what a lot of people say about them here in N. America. If anyone has ever been commercial fishing in Alaska on an aluminum boat you will know that they have a habit of throwing old steel blocks in the bilge and they stay there for 20 years or so, still no problem.

As for the Boreal itself. What Chall03 says, "a seriously nice boat". The design is amazing as she does passages across oceans in an amazing sea kindly way. Withe lee dagger board down there is no wobble of the ass end that you get on many cutter rigs on a long broad reach. The aluminum is quiet beyond belief with its 3 inches of insulation. And she goes to weather very nicely for a centerboard boat. Also she heaves to better than any boat I have sailed on in the last 40 years.

Cheers
Steve and Tracy
I think Chall03 was saying he has Boreal envy, not a Boreal named Envy! They are beautiful boats though. If i were on a much bigger budget they would be on the top of the list.
 

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Steve-
I'm delighted you posted. As you know you and Tracy are a inspiration to Cheryl. When we talk about our plans and she gets apprehensive having her know about your extensive voyaging gives her a shot of courage. As you know from ski team fortunately she already has great courage but that extra jolt is quite helpful.
My final list was Boreal and Outbound. Cheryl was put off by what she thought was the complexity of the boat. She didn't want to deal with daggerboards, center boards and the like. Even now she doesn't like dealing with running backs ( only used on passage), vangs, hydraulic back stay and it remains my job to trim those.
Still, I often wonder about the Boreal once they agreed to put in a more American style galley and spec to U.S. standards it was truly a 50/50 choice for me.
You point out a key attribute for a good cruising boat. Just went to the SDR seminars yesterday. Lecturers on sail plan had pointed out on passage and circumnavigating 63% of the time is spent with wind 90-160 degrees apparent with winds 10-25k true.
Your boat with its leeboard down and my boat given its fine entry and exit track with no squirrelnest. Beyond favorable gyradius ( you have your chain next to the mast- I have all tanks below sole near center of gravity) I think hull design that minimizes cork screwing is as important as the absence of slamming and pounding up wind.
Leaving for a week with Cheryl. She has lost the drama queen persona coming into new anchorages so should be great fun now school has started and the world will be our own.
 

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Old Salt
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Thanks for updates. Interesting also that no Hans Christian's are listed. The 33's in particular are known for there blue-water prowess. I have a HC38T and after many miles I trust her with my life! Comfortable too, and built like a tank. Performance is moderate, but she will always arrive!
 

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Thanks for updates. Interesting also that no Hans Christian's are listed. The 33's in particular are known for there blue-water prowess. I have a HC38T and after many miles I trust her with my life! Comfortable too, and built like a tank. Performance is moderate, but she will always arrive!
Any list is going to leave some off, no matter how complete. Seems that no matter what the chances it will be left off goes way up if you happen to own that boat! Hans Christians are pretty pretty boats, and very capable! I would not hesitate taking one around the world if I knew her to be well found.
 

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Cruisin' for a Bruisin'
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You have Pacific Seacraft marked as out of business. They are still building boats using W.I.B. Crealock's designs, albeit under new management.

-C
 

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Ray, my name is Roy. .Roy, I Built Full Sail In British Columbia Canada a few years ago my phone number is 604 846 5781 would like to have a word with you if you don't mind, thanks, Roy Robinson .
 

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I guess I need to stop looking at Jeanneau. I thought them a strong boat. What did I miss?

~Chris
Jeanneau is a well made production boat, similar to any production boat like Beneteau, Catalina, Hunter etc. Designed for coastal sailing. Fine for offshore work, but this list is more for long term offshore distance cruising. For that the sea motion of a designed for offshore boat is better. If you want to do a crossing or two you will be fine, but if you plan on long term sailing where weather windows are not as reliable you will be better served with something built for it.


Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

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Category A EU RCD certifications, but that doesn't necessarily indicate that their boats are suitable for extended bluewater voyaging. Many of their boats which are EU RCD A certified are not suitable due to a serious lack of proper handholds, unseakindly motion, lack of tankage and stowage, etc.
 

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Good morning Washaki..where in South Dakota you hail from? Really enjoyed being in an around the Black Hills made my assignment at Ellsworth AFB much more bearable.. :)

Regards,

Clay AA3JY
S/V Tango

CR 34 (rated Cat. A)
 

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One of the most unforgettable rides. All the animals, the contrast between badlands and black hills, how quickly the weather varied, needles, Custer, etc.
I like to ride as sun comes up or goes down. That’s the only downer. Truly a no-no in your neck of the woods.
Where do you sail?

Problem with all lists are they are subjective and in one facet or another flawed. The EU speaks to boats as they come “out the door”. ABYC, Lloyd’s, norske veritas, German Lloyd, whatever have requirements or lack requirements that a sub specialist in that facet can cogently argue. Furthermore even in a particular production run there’s a fairly wide variance between the execution of individual boats. Then there’s wear and tear and adequacy of maintenance.
In science and medicine you are taught to not accept or reject a given null hypothesis as “more likely than not” and therefore fact until multiple rigorous studies have demonstrated it. Think it’s the same with a boat you are going to bet your life on. Sure it gives comfort when your boat carries these certificates and appears on these lists. It gives greater comfort if she not only does but also passes survey and you have acquired some level of knowledge as to what makes a good bwb and your boat meets your standards.
 

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Do any of these lists actually consider the livability of these boats, underway or at sea? To me, that is one of the most important considerations when I am seeking a boat that will be my home on the water.
 

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One of the most unforgettable rides. All the animals, the contrast between badlands and black hills, how quickly the weather varied, needles, Custer, etc.
I like to ride as sun comes up or goes down. That’s the only downer. Truly a no-no in your neck of the woods.
Where do you sail?
I grew up in the Black Hills - beautiful place to live. Unfortunately, no place to really sail other than maybe a sailing dinghy or HobieCat. For the mountain lakes, waterskiing is the way to spend time on the water.

And you are right, the riding is some of the best in the country - half the reason the Sturgis rally is so big.
 

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Ya . You only need so many T shirts. Went down Main Street. Didn’t even get off the bike. Next time Yellowstone.
If you come out to the east the dragon tail and Cabot’s will catch your attention.
 

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I grew up in the Black Hills - beautiful place to live.

And you are right, the riding is some of the best in the country - half the reason the Sturgis rally is so big.
Can’t beat a full moon night ride through the Bad Lands..visit the spirits at Wounded Knee memorial..or climb Bear Butte and watch the sun rise..

Pactola Reservoir is probably the closest and largest body of water for sailing closest to Rapid City in the ‘ Hills.
 

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Ya . You only need so many T shirts. Went down Main Street. Didn’t even get off the bike. Next time Yellowstone.
If you come out to the east the dragon tail and Cabot’s will catch your attention.
I'm from Richmond and have ridden my HD FLHSTC on the Tail of the Dragon, Devil's Backbone many times.
 

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Their online list from April of 2007 doesn't have the Passport 40. Last time I checked, the Passport 40 was supposed to be a fair to middlin' (or excellent) Bluewater transoceanic boat... but to each their own.
 
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