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SailRN
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Unwanted responses.
 

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OS jobs can be found through the seafarers international union, the oilfield in the gulf has been in fits and starts but jobs on supply boats can be found. Also tug companies anywhere in the US.

Is there a reason you want to work specifically on non US flagged vessels?

I worked on Marshall Islands flagged vessels but only as an engineer in the AMO. The non licensed crew members were foreign. The dynamically positioned drilling rig I worked on was MI registered but utilized Americans as OS and AB.
 

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Rainwatcher
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You need to talk to a lawyer.

The internet is the worst place mankind has ever invented for legal advice, which is exactly what you're asking for.
 

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SailRN
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
You need to talk to a lawyer.

The internet is the worst place mankind has ever invented for legal advice, which is exactly what you're asking for.
If you had READ my post, you would have seen that I asked for ONLY maritime labor lawyers or crew placement specialists or an American with first hand knowledge to respond.

Why are you posting such a useless reply?
 

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The commercial maritime industry tends to be very cost conscious, and often IMO abusive to employees, so I imagine being hired internationally in that industry as an American would be an uphill battle.

There are specialist positions very hard to fill, where companies are willing to invest the time and energy to "sponsor" the employee, pay for the lawyers etc required.

When they say Schengen "visa", they likely mean they are only hiring those qualified to **work** in the EU, with all the pre-requisite paperwork in hand at the time you apply for the job.

Even if you do invest the many months and thousands of dollars required to get authoritative legal advice documented, that will not change their mind about what their requirements are.
 

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And good luck telling people what to post.

Feel free to just ignore those posts that you consider unhelpful, no point in getting upset trying to control such things in an open forum, just makes you look, well, leave it at that.
 

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SailRN
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Discussion Starter #7
Well it appears that I'm not going to get any useful answers, just useless unwanted information, even as I thought I asked very politely for only certain people to reply.
 

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Let it sit a few months, monitor weekly, someone qualified may eventually come along.

Just realize they're answer will likely not be what you want to hear.
 

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Unwanted responses.
.........
Why are you posting such a useless reply?
Well it appears that I'm not going to get any useful answers, just useless unwanted information, even as I thought I asked very politely for only certain people to reply.
A duplicate thread? I just noticed the original was edited too.

You really think you've been all that polite? Your original premise belittle anyone without the prerequisite to answer your question, when you have no way to know if they have it or not. You can't get social media to follow your directive and more than you can get these foreign employers to cooperate. Not how life works.

I'm seeing a pattern.
 

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Master Mariner
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A duplicate thread? I just noticed the original was edited too.

You really think you've been all that polite? Your original premise belittle anyone without the prerequisite to answer your question, when you have no way to know if they have it or not. You can't get social media to follow your directive and more than you can get these foreign employers to cooperate. Not how life works.

I'm seeing a pattern.
Hey, it's really nothing to concern ourselves with. This person wouldn't last a week on a crew anyway, with his attitude.
I've seen it dozens of times (and fired 'em all); they won't be on the boat more than 24 hours before they're telling everybody, including the captain, that they've a better way to do everything, including clean the toilets!
But, just in case he hasn't tried searching;
Schengen Visa - Comprehensive information about Europe Visa
https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/
Everything you need to know about Schengen Agreement, Countries, Visa Types, Requirements, Insurance, Application Form, Guidelines and How to Apply.
Visa Application Requirements
Schengen Visa Application Requirements. When applying ...
Applying for a Schengen Visa
...
Applying for a Schengen Visa in India – EU Visa Requirements ...
Schengen visa application
A Step by Step Guide on How to Apply for a Schengen Visa ...

Who needs a Schengen Visa?
... to make sure who needs a Schengen visa before travelling ...
Schengen Area
Spain Visa - Germany - Greece - Portugal Schengen Visa - ...

Tourist Visa
A Tourist Schengen Visa permits third-country nationals enter ...
More results from schengenvisainfo.com »
 
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And good luck telling people what to post.
Funny how many people try to do that, though. I always get a pretty hearty laugh from the folks who think they can dictate to others what and how to post on a public forum, and then an even bigger laugh when they get all pissy because the responses aren't what they wanted.
 

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Arcb, prepare to be spanked for your input. You didn't tell the OP what he wanted to hear, nor proved your qualifications to answer the question. Forgivable perhaps, since said qualifications were in the OP that was deleted.

My guess is the OP is simply unemployable for other reasons. Would I be wrong to say the Merchant Marine community is a fairly small community, where reputation, or lack thereof, is easily researched? The very few I know seem to rely on their personal networks, relationships they've developed over the years, to get the jobs they want. This ranges from a harbor pilot to a drilling ship captain.
 

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OP if you do come back to read this, don't get angry please, I'm not even talking to you at all here. And best of luck to you in chasing your dreams, sincerely.

rely on their personal networks, relationships they've developed over the years, to get the jobs they want.
Yes I also am thinking that too

Getting work overseas from foreign owners may well be so vanishingly rare it probably works differently, but starting off here

with a question trying to overcome one of the hurdles by trying to prove the prospective employers are "wrong" in one of their more minor (to them) requirements,

seems like an inefficient approach.

I wonder if gaining all those requirements was done with this goal in mind from the beginning but without doing any research as to the job market, or how to go about starting on a job hunt?

Just having a unique combination of unrelated qualifications doesn't always translate into easily getting the intended position. I wonder what other types of maritime companies employ nurses, besides navies and cruise ships? School ships?

More likely to get a nursing job on US soil but in popular sailing locations, and then work out a work schedule that allowed for sailing say 3-4 months of the year, I would think that would be relatively straightforward.

I've dated a lot of nurses over the years since I was a teenager long ago, mostly non-USians living or wanting to live outside their home country, married one in fact!

There are very few locations in the world where nursing wages are better than here, and the qualification paperwork always needs a lot of effort to get "translated" to a new jurisdiction.

And to others deciding on what career dreams to pursue: if yours is an unusual combination, doing this sort of research before starting to acquire the qualifications, would be a **really** good idea.
 

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Rainwatcher
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Why are you posting such a useless reply?
Because my wife was in the bathroom, and I was killing time while I waited to take a dump.
 

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Master Mariner
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OP if you do come back to read this, don't get angry please, I'm not even talking to you at all here. And best of luck to you in chasing your dreams, sincerely.

Yes I also am thinking that too

Getting work overseas from foreign owners may well be so vanishingly rare it probably works differently, but starting off here

with a question trying to overcome one of the hurdles by trying to prove the prospective employers are "wrong" in one of their more minor (to them) requirements,

seems like an inefficient approach.

I wonder if gaining all those requirements was done with this goal in mind from the beginning but without doing any research as to the job market, or how to go about starting on a job hunt?

Just having a unique combination of unrelated qualifications doesn't always translate into easily getting the intended position. I wonder what other types of maritime companies employ nurses, besides navies and cruise ships? School ships?

More likely to get a nursing job on US soil but in popular sailing locations, and then work out a work schedule that allowed for sailing say 3-4 months of the year, I would think that would be relatively straightforward.

I've dated a lot of nurses over the years since I was a teenager long ago, mostly non-USians living or wanting to live outside their home country, married one in fact!

There are very few locations in the world where nursing wages are better than here, and the qualification paperwork always needs a lot of effort to get "translated" to a new jurisdiction.

And to others deciding on what career dreams to pursue: if yours is an unusual combination, doing this sort of research before starting to acquire the qualifications, would be a **really** good idea.
What everybody has seemed to have forgotten is the $1200.00 or so it takes to get the STCW certification to work on ANY vessel that travels internationally. For ANY crew position, (stew, cook, engineer's helper, etc) on up on yachts (not sure about non-deck crew on ships these days).
So, long before any visa will come up that certification must be in hand. It isn't like it used to be; just jump aboard a boat and get paid for sailing. It costs some pretty serious money these days before one can even be qualified for the lowliest position.
I was one of the lucky ones; they grandfathered me in, so I didn't have to spend the cash.
 

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What everybody has seemed to have forgotten is the $1200.00 or so it takes to get the STCW certification to work on ANY vessel that travels internationally. For ANY crew position, (stew, cook, engineer's helper, etc) on up on yachts (not sure about non-deck crew on ships these days).
Wiki says the standards are for*"masters, officers and watch personnel" only?
 
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