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.....Any knowledge of this situation? (Not guesses, nor opinions, just first-hand knowledge - PLEASE)
I understand what you're saying, but there is no way you're going to be able to tell the difference on an internet forum.

Bottom line is, your prospective employer is going to tell you what they want. Even if they're wrong, you're not going to change their mind. My guess, which you don't want, is the answer is variable based upon the flag of the vessel, where it's going, what it's doing, etc. Good luck.
 

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> I need authoritative advice

There is an entire profession dedicated to this. If you want authoritative advice about the law, you should talk to a lawyer. I'm guessing that an international employment attorney could answer this question for you.

I read that providing specific, tailored legal advice *without* being a lawyer is a crime in many states. So... yeah.
 

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Fact: Americans can stay in the EU according to Schengen for 90 days and then they must leave the Schengen countries for 90 days. If you are working aboard a boat based in the EU or remains in EU waters, you must leave the EU for 90 days.
A quick trip to North Africa for a day is not a way to circumvent this. The rules, to the best of my knowledge are very strict, though I've heard of many Americans who ignore this on their own boat, keeping a low profile. I'm not so sure you will have any way to keep a low profile if the vessel is traveling to and from the EU regularly.
If you find a captain willing to take you aboard, he may know some way to deal with this, but otherwise, it is 90 days in and 90 days out!
 

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If an employment ad states they require a Schengen visa, then you have no chance trying to "educate" them even if they are "wrong".

Even with a legal brief prepared by a top firm specializing in such matters, costing thousands of dollars in fees.

EU recent-immigrants work for much lower wages and put up with the standard abuses much better.

And multi-lingual EU local citizens are also available by the millions for not much more.

Maybe consider working as an English teacher?
 

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I found a website that you might find helpful. It's at www.schengenvisainfo.com. One part in particular seems to address your question. Here it is:

"US Citizen Rejected from Entering Europe Visa-Free

As previously stated, if you were rejected from entering the Schengen Zone, despite of being a US national or a national of a country that has established visa-free regime with the European Union, you will need to apply for a Schengen visa in the United States.

You can apply for a visa at the embassy or consulate of the main country you wish to visit, located in the US. Sometimes embassies outsource visa submission to the embassy or consulate of another Schengen country or third parties that offer visa services.

For more information, read the article “How and Where to Apply for a Schengen Visa in the US?"

Thus, even though US Citizens are exempt from the Schengen requirement, that first paragraph clearly contemplates that US citizens are sometimes denied entry without one. Elsewhere in that website it says the decision of the official is final, and your only recourse is to return to the US and obtain a schengen visa from the the embassy or consulate of the main country you wish to visit, located in the US.

That would explain why potential employers want you to obtain a schengen visa before they employ you.

I suggest you read through that website carefully and completely. It is very informative.
 

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On the flip side, I'm told that many US vessel owners are motivated, in part, to flag their vessel in a foreign country, or a non-state US possession, because it makes it easier to hire a foreign crew. Not the OP's question, of course, but I find that interesting. I can't quote the law, just something I've heard.

To the OP, you're getting about the best you can expect from asking a bunch of strangers at the bar. No one is trying to be rude or critical. It would be a great contribution to the community, if you let us know what you learn in your pursuit. I'm sure others are interested. Good luck.
 

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On the flip side, I'm told that many US vessel owners are motivated, in part, to flag their vessel in a foreign country, or a non-state US possession, because it makes it easier to hire a foreign crew. Not the OP's question, of course, but I find that interesting. I can't quote the law, just something I've heard.

To the OP, you're getting about the best you can expect from asking a bunch of strangers at the bar. No one is trying to be rude or critical. It would be a great contribution to the community, if you let us know what you learn in your pursuit. I'm sure others are interested. Good luck.
I have found this to be true in a lot of cases, as even American owners will not hire American citizens as crew because of the litigiousness of our society. We have been aboard several large American owned (not flagged) yachts without one single American on the crew.
Sadly, during my career, I went from being the preferred crew (as captain) aboard any flagged vessel to being almost a pariah.
I wish the OP all the luck in the world, but I suggest he seek work aboard American or Marshall Island flagged vessels rather than fight the system. I certainly am glad I am at the end of my career, rather than at the beginning, but I guess I can say that about the state of the world in general.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My search on the Internet indicates a) the Schengen visa is not required for US passport holders, and b) the Schengen visa is not a work permit, though it permits business trips.

Further research indicates that to work in another country requires a specific country issue a specific work permit to work solely in that specific country.
The above is what I've found so far in researching this on various websites that seem to be authoritative.

I've emailed the US State Deparment, the USCG, the European Border and Coast Guard, the ILO, and international crew agencies. So far, from an international crew placement agency: "From what I have heard before, Americans do not need a visa to work on foreign flagged vessels. I believe that an American can fly to Europe on vacation and stay for up to I believe it is 3 months." I am hoping for something more concrete, from FIRST-HAND experience or knowledge. I've had many "guesses".

I will certainly share what I learn, but at this point I have no first-hand knowledge nor has anyone supplied any to me.
 

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I'm curious what you expect from any reported first hand experience. It won't be authoritative and could be outdated today. I don't see it as any more valuable than those trying to help in other ways, which seems to annoy you.

Your thread has provoked me to check on an interesting fact. One of my grandparents was born in the EU and it looks like I qualify to apply for citizenship, as a result. I may think about doing that. I have no desire to give up my US citizenship, but understand the US allows dual citizenship, with those countries that do not require an oath to defend. US citizenship does require an oath to defend and those can't compete. I know Britain does not, as my wife is a dual Brit/US citizen. The brexit thing could change things for her in the EU, but that's still to be seen if it will happen. Even post brexit, it's still possible that trade agreements allow a brit citizen more rights in the EU than a US citizen. We'll see.

Any chance this is an opportunity for you? If these ideas are annoying to you, we're happy to go play elsewhere and leave you to your journey alone.
 

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Yes, I just pointed out the situation is "in flux".

So even if someone had a certain experience in the recent past, that does not mean yours will be the same a few months from now.

Again - if an employer's recruiting ad says you need an EU Visa, it simply does not matter what the legal requirements are.

Just get the visa even if it is not required, if you want to be considered for the position.
 

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US citizens pay taxes regardless of where the income is earned.

There are reciprocity treaties so you can deduct taxes paid to other jurisdictions.

Complexity requiring expensive lawyers.

People making under a certain threshold are exempted from paying, but never from filing.
 

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US citizens pay taxes regardless of where the income is earned.

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I understand it's a touch more complicated than that. I think what you pay depends on a number of factors, such as whether you are working for a foreign affiliate of a US employer or for a foreign employer, or even whether you're a government employee. Whether you still reside in the US and are working overseas, or reside overseas too. Then, I understand income tax is an entirely different beast from medicare and social security. Gives me a headache.
 

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On another point of taxation, I have taken exemptions for doing work in another State, or in particular, outside of a city income tax jurisdiction. I've had to keep a calendar of days I collected income, but was not inside their city jurisdiction and claimed a reduction in local taxable income. Makes sense, but what a pain to keep track of.
 
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