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Discussion Starter #1
To use a spinnaker pole in instead of an extendable whisker pole I need to come up with a compromised length. Most spinnaker pole recommended lengths are for the J dimension. Using a 130% headsail on roller furling, I am wonder whether the pole should be longer - say 1.3 times J. Of course I am not intending to JIB the pole - but if I had to, just use the dip method.
Thoughts?
alan
 

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I have used my spinnaker pole as you suggest when racing jib-and-main or cruising. The fixed length is definitely an issue. Sometimes too short, and others too long.
 

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Sorry - I just realized that you want to size the spin pole, not the whisker pole. The spin pole should be 100% of the J per PHRF rules.
 

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Wannabe Sailing Bum
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What do you mean you won't jibe the pole? At some point you need to turn, thus you need to jibe. Dip poling is near impossible if you have a pole longer than J. Also consider how much extra weight you'll need to deal with at 1.3x J.

Additionally, just yesterday I was heading downwind wing on wing flying my 110%. Wind was at 12kts and rather flukey (common in SF Bay). The jib was not fully cooperating, so I considered (for a moment) using the spinnaker pole. I didn't feel like rigging the foreguy, so I opted out. However, the length of my pole (equal to J) would have worked just fine. I speculate even better had I been flying the 140%.
 

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Sailor
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The reason a whisker pole varies in length is so that it can be used with different sized jibs. Just using the spin pole (or any fixed length pole would be somewhat limiting. The length of a whisker pole is not a function of J because it depends on the length of the foot of the jib and the height of the clew. If you want to pole out a jib and not use a spin, just trade the pole in. A whisker will work way better.
 

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To use a spinnaker pole in instead of an extendable whisker pole I need to come up with a compromised length. Most spinnaker pole recommended lengths are for the J dimension. Using a 130% headsail on roller furling, I am wonder whether the pole should be longer - say 1.3 times J. Of course I am not intending to JIB the pole - but if I had to, just use the dip method.
Thoughts?
alan
You can use without problems a spi pole on a genoa. I do that all the time when wing on wing to balance the boat, specially if my son is at the helm..

Mine in the photo bellow is a 115% on a furler, and it works just fine. The pole serves only to stop the clew from "returning" to the boat and flapping the sail..sheet in / out as needed to keep the sail curvature, and rig the uphaul to support the weight of the pole, so it does not pull the sail down and deform it. In heavier winds, pull the pole down withth the downhaul to flaten the sail, and reduce spillage at higher sections of the genoa

See for yourself.

 

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I'd second the idea of trading the pole for a proper whisker if you have no plans to use a spinnaker. A bastardized spinnaker pole will be heavier than a proper whisker pole and less versatile, as you already know.

Should you decide later to use the spinnaker the modified pole will not work well in most cases (whether too short or too long).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I know all about the proper uses of spinnaker poles and a whisker poles.
No room to store both. I thought I could make my own spinnaker pole for less then a 1/3 of the cost of a new one. Just trying to be frugal with something that could work 90% of the time. Just a cruiser with no intentions of going high tech.
 

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If like Giu. am using a 115 jib, then using phrf rules, a max 80% of the LP of a jib, assuming a J of 10 for easy math, 80% equal 8.8' so the pole at J is 1.2' long is no big deal for cruising. for racing, yes an issue. That would be protestable.

On the other hand, if trying to use the smaller pole for a 155, then you would lose some efficiency, but still work able, ie a 155 would want an 80% pole of about 12.4'. f course using above J of 10'.

Going the other way, using a max jib at 80% pole length, a 125 jib would equal a 10' pole.

As you say tho, if not too worried about efficiency, a pole at J length would work.

Have you looked into the pole holders that hang on your lifeline stanchions? You could then have on per side of the boat, both a spinny pole and a whisker pole. Both out of the way.

Marty
 

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If you want one pole for genoa as well as spinnaker, the best choice is an adjustable pole. Really good deals can sometimes be found on used poles, by checking ebay and local classified ads. It's very difficult and expensive to ship them by commercial carrier, so the seller can only sell them locally. I found a beautiful, hardly used telescoping pole for my 35' boat for $350.00. The telescoping pole is a little heavier, and more difficult to handle, but you just have to learn how.
 

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Hitchin' a ride
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Mounting it on the mast with a track and line can help in the deployment and storage.
 

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On my olde 36 ft cutter, I fitted one of those American Forespar whisker poles. It's a good unit, but on a cutter, man it is heavy...

Image of Loch Ness, Summer 2007 - Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

I think the telescoping facility must add to the weight, as this one is very heavy, and needs two men to fly it, plus helmsman.

Using it alone just about hangs you, and heaven help you if you get overpowered when you are rigging it. It's got all the fancy pulleys and chokes and cleats and stuff, but it is heavy.

For that reason, a lot of the dead-downwind stuff I just do on full main alone. A full main is far more forgiving, methinks, and, alone, it is much easier to kill than that beast of a pole and genoa.

Watch the angles too... it is very easy to bend the storage mechanism and fingers can get trapped. With a cutter, you must raise and swing-through to beat the inner forestay.

It's practice, I suppose, and experience, but I get wary of it sometimes, and so the learning curve is very long.

Once rigged with a big genoa, it certainly can pull, and on Loch Ness, the wind does not swing very much.

Rockter.
 

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Handsome devil
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Rockter...What a beautiful spot you have...
 
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