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Discussion Starter #1
I''ve just bought A 1966 Pearson Vangaurd wich has been beautifuly restored outside. Decks and topsides etc. are great but below needs some help. My main problem is what to do with the faux wood formica on bulkheads and doors short of tearing it all out and replacing it? Can it be painted? If so, how? Any other suggestions would be welcome.
Thanks,
elliott
 

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Elliot:

I''ve not had experience painting formica surfaces, ''tho I''m sure that would be possible given instructions from a knowledgeable source. But for improved appearance, you might consider doorskins (those mohogany veneers applied to hollow-cored doors in low-to-med cost new home construction). These are typically available at home improvement centers, so you can look over the selection available in your area. (An alternative is to purchase more expensive wood veneers from a well-known supplier of boat wood & ply). In either case, the labor of carefully making patterns, cutting the veneers sharply & carefully, and then applying them permanently is where the challenge lies...but the results should be great.

You might think of a blend of choices: recovering any horizontal surfaces with fresh formica (to minimize wear), painting some formica surfaces to lighten the interior, and applying veneer where it would provide the most cosmetic improvement.

Jack
 

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I did the "noveau paneling" on my Bristol 35 1972 bulkheads, cabinets, etc. last year with paint. First you rough them up in good shape with a palm sander with 80 grit to get the gloss off. Then step down until you have a fairly smooth finish (to, say, 220 grit). Then wipe the hell out of them with an appropriate solvent for the type of paint you''re using. The problem with the formica is getting a "tooth" good enough to hold paint without it chipping when you touch it. I was in a hurry, so I used acetone. Then I used an oil based enamel undercoater and two and three coated with regular household enamel wall paint (oil based). I used a satin finish. It looks great, and, if you gouge it, touches up easy. I applied everything with a little foam roller, which gives it a consistent stippled-look finish. Frig around with it and you''ll get what you want. I suppose that you could use polyurethane boat paint, but I paid about $7 a qt. instead of $26/qt. and can touch up, and, actually, repaint pretty easily now. Bang the finish with a sharp edge and it will come off. As I recall, I may have had to 2-coat with the enamel undercoater to kill the dark panel color shadowing through. Kw
 

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A sanding sealer called "Wil-Bond" which is a heavy duty solvent is probably the best thing to wipe down with pre-priming.....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks alot for the information.Sounds like A good plan. The way I see it I can''t loose.
Elliott
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks alot for the information.Sounds like A good plan. The way I see it I can''t loose.
Elliott
 
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