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Discussion Starter #1
I have been varnishing the Teak & Holley sole pieces that I was able to bring home... It comes out great but there is so much dust that collects on it, when it dries looks disappointing...I''m reluctant to do the salon floor come Spring...any suggestions for a nice final finish?
 

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If you''re looking for a flawless satin finish.... hand-rub with "rotten stone" and water. If more dull, use pumice and water or oil. If shiney ... rotten stone and oil. Dont use a cloth... just put in on and rub with your clean hand.
Most varnished surfaces need to be final hand-rubbed to eliminate the dust particles, flaws, etc.
Get the rotten stone in a paint store or hardware store.
Consider urethane on the saloon sole... less apt to be as slippery when wet.
Hope this helps. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I like the finish the satin varnish gives me after 3 coats(sanding 220 inbetween)but the finish as I mentioned has alot of dust...does the rotten stone change the finish?
 

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For a LOT of imperfections you probably need to simply just recoat. But before you do do that perhaps you should consider if the the flaws are truly dust , ... or dirt particles from a dirty brush ... or simply old varnish that is full of ''gel'' particles.
If you have a lot of surface AND your brush is the "dirt culprit" consider to use a super-high quality foam roller and then ''tip'' with a brand new badger brush.
As regards rotten stone changing the finish.... yes, anything you do may change the finish as blending in repairs will always be somewhat noticeable, unless you uniformly and carefully rub the entire surface. I start with plain rotten stone and if then if a more coarse finish is needed, then switch to progresively ever coarser grades of pumice.
For a final satin finish final coat, for myself, I''d wet-sand the imperfect previous coats with 320, use a tack rag to very carefully & scrupulously clean the surface, and attempt a fresh coat with brand new, never opened varnish. I personally never like the ''out of the can'' satin finishes and always hand rub .... starting with rotten stone, then pumice, then very fine bronze/steel wool, etc. .... and stopping with the coarseness that gives the best satin satisfaction (judgement call at the time).
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I start with a new can of varnish, sand piece with 220grit, wipe with mineral spirits on rag to get everything off top bottom sides..let dry.. tack rag, take clean brush...and varnish... as I''m about done I can see the dust clinging to it...the varnishing itself is mint, just the dust spots...aarrgghhh!
 

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Ain''t it hell??!!!I''ve done it a thousand times and a thousand times the same. ALL antone can do is duplicate the techniques that auto spray boothes use to get those unbelievable surfaces! As much fanaticism as you can muster goes a long way. Take off your clothes.Put your hair in a net. Put on a paper suit.Vacuum everything for a week. Wipe down hose down tack down....then vacuum some more. Leave. Let the air settle close up the whole place for at least an hour. Shake off your paper suit, put it on...walk very slowly. Seal up your chamber, Barefoot,.wipe everything down again. Vacuum exaust should be venting outside through all this..extractor fan would help....use quick dry for the top coat...breath softly, move as if on ricepaper....settle for what you get......Rev....maritimetradition.com
 

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This is good (if you can stand it)but theres an easier way. I,m a Southern male, so it involves the extensive use of duct tape. If you can power ventilate, you can create a virtually dust free environment in your garage/shop. You can build a knockdown paint booth to fit in your shop/garage/etc. with a 3/4" pvc pipe frame and polyethylene sheeting. Use tee''s and elbows to make a 7'' cube, seal completely with sheeting and duct tape. If you use a filtered blower pushing air into the paintbooth, it creates a positve pressure that helps keep dust out. You can build the blower with a simple plywood box slotted on one end to hold three standard hvac filters, stacked, blower on the other end. Seal the joints with glue or duct tape. Build an exhaust port by making a frame to hold one filter. Duct tape the blower and port to the sheeting on opposite sides and slit one wall for a door. Put the part you want to varish on sawhorses in the booth,turn on blower and seal door with duct tape and wear a spraymask. Good luck!
 
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