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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ahoy,
I am having trouble finding replacement deck ventilators for my 1990 37. Vetus is the original manufacturer, but their new production units are a slightly different size than the originals installed during the boats manufacture.
Has anyone replaced these vent assemblies? Mine are not salvageable as the bronze threaded shaft has seized and hence destroyed the threads making movement of the shaft/cap impossible. In trying to do so it broke off!
Vetus makes a slightly smaller version now, but I have the existing holes in the cabin top, along with the teak dorade boxes, so I was wondering if anyone had previously dealt with this issue.
Thanks,
Bill
 

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Coastal Carolinas
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Bill, I replaced our Vetus dorades with exact same model by Vetus. My lock ring was also frozen but was able to compress base of rubber dorade close to ring and pull out in one piece. Used a large channel lock plier. New dorade by Vetus came with new lock ring which I removed and compressed base flange of dorade into existing ring. Heated up the base of rubber dorade with heat gun so it was pliable. Still able to turn dorade as before and seems good and secure. The new dorades have a rubber flange at base that fitted nicely under old lock ring. Hope that helps.

John Schwab
S/V Norstar
1990 PSC # 201
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I ended up ordering the current production Vetus Athos ventilators. They are slightly smaller than the originals ( about 1/8" smaller in diameter ). The original trim ring will not fit the new version, so I will have to use the included one. It is just barely big enough in diameter to cover the hole in the headliner. I haven't installed them yet, but I expect to be able to fit the above deck portion into the existing cabin-top hole with only minor additional sealing.
It is humorous to me that Vetus would make the current version just a bit smaller so that it would not be a direct replacement to their previous production units.
Oh well...
I'll follow up after the installation. It won't be right away, as I have to carefully remove the teak dorade boxes, etc.
 

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Pacific Seacraft 34
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Perhaps a tad late to the party, but we also replaced our mushrooms (we went from the original Vetus cowl assemblies to dorades and boxes) and had no issues with sizing.
 

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We just swapped our dartagn1 vents because they seized up. The only size difference in the new ones was the diameter of the hole in the deck and the plastic trim ring lining the hole, which don't affect the replacement. Everything else was the same, including the screw hole placement in the deck. The dimensions on the websites are confusing because they are originally metric and inaccurately converted to US on some of the sites.

Dave Mancini
PSC 34 #305 "Swan"
 

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Thanks for this post Bill. I have exactly the same problem with dorade vents on my 2004 PS37 (i.e., the bronze threads are seized). I hope you can answer two questions:

What's the part number of the Vetus system you purchased?

On which side of the dorade boxes are the screwhole bungs? I'd prefer not to dig out every bung looking for the correct screws to remove the boxes.

Many thanks!

Paul
 

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I was able to free mine up by fashioning a square headed punch out of a carriage bolt to drive against the ring. I first tried a block of oak, but it wouldn't deliver a sharp enough blow to break it loose.
 

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I was able to free mine up by fashioning a square headed punch out of a carriage bolt to drive against the ring. I first tried a block of oak, but it wouldn't deliver a sharp enough blow to break it loose.
Did you do that from down below? I would think it runs a real risk of damaging the frame (aluminum?) on which the screw fitting (the seized bit) is mounted.

I haven't removed the dorade boxes yet. I'm waiting for Bill to tell us where the screws are located (under which bungs, that is; I don't see bungs on both ends of my boxes -- just one end each).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for this post Bill. I have exactly the same problem with dorade vents on my 2004 PS37 (i.e., the bronze threads are seized). I hope you can answer two questions:

What's the part number of the Vetus system you purchased?

On which side of the dorade boxes are the screwhole bungs? I'd prefer not to dig out every bung looking for the correct screws to remove the boxes.
Hi Paul,
Sorry for the late reply. I haven't done the job yet, so I can't be specific about removing the boxes until I do so. The model of vent I bought was the Athos 1. The Dartagn1 was too large in diameter for the holes in my cabintop. The Athos 1 was about 1/8", or so smaller the the original vent, but will fit fine and the trim ring will fit as well without any gap in coverage of the headliner. I will post with a report on the job when I actually do it. I'm doing another somewhat large job right now (electrical upgrade), so it won't be very soon, though.
For anyone curious about the original problem... The bronze threaded shaft the the knob is supposed to turn, to open and close the vent, had seized in the stationary nut that it goes through. This caused the knob to break when I applied a strong turning force (the jam nut that was supposed to prevent the knob from just threading up the shaft didn't do it's job). I then double nutted the threaded shaft in an attempt to use a tool with more leverage to turn the seized shaft. This force caused the seized threaded shaft to essentially rip out the threads from both the threaded shaft and the stationary nut. Hence the need to replace the units.
The boat is new to me and the previous owner apparently never operated the vents, so the seizure is understandable.
Anyway, I'll follow up when I do the job.
Bill
 

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Hi Paul,
For anyone curious about the original problem... The bronze threaded shaft the the knob is supposed to turn, to open and close the vent, had seized in the stationary nut that it goes through. This caused the knob to break when I applied a strong turning force (the jam nut that was supposed to prevent the knob from just threading up the shaft didn't do it's job). I then double nutted the threaded shaft in an attempt to use a tool with more leverage to turn the seized shaft. This force caused the seized threaded shaft to essentially rip out the threads from both the threaded shaft and the stationary nut. Hence the need to replace the units.
The boat is new to me and the previous owner apparently never operated the vents, so the seizure is understandable.
Anyway, I'll follow up when I do the job.
Bill
Thanks for the update Bill. We probably have the same bronze threads because mine are frozen solid from lack of use by the first owner.

I was examining the wooden dorade boxes again yesterday. I can see that the intake end of each box is attached to the boat by two strips of wood attached to the cabin roof. There are bung holes in two sides of the boxes for the screws. I can dig out the bungs and remove these. Easy. But I cannot see how the OTHER end of the box (the end with the outlet into) is attached to the cabin roof. There are no bung holes, so I'm sure it's not attached in the same way as the intake end. Looking from inside, I cannot see how it might be attached. (I have not removed the headliner, and I don't want to go down that route if it's avoidable.)

Have you been able to figure this out? I'm tempted to remove the four screws I know about to see if the box lifts off, but I just cannot believe that PS would attach the box with only four screws on one end of the box. I might just end up with screwless dorade box that's still firmly attached to the boat.

Thanks!
 

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Has anyone reading this actually removed a teak dorade box from a Pacific Seacraft (ideally a 37, if they differ at all among models)? Looking at the bungs in my boat's boxes, it appears that they are attached on TWO sides (not all four, as I would anticipate). Thumper thinks this might be the case.

I am asking because I don't want to dig out the four bungs on two sides that I see, only to find that the boxes won't come off without major work from inside to find other attachment points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Has anyone reading this actually removed a teak dorade box from a Pacific Seacraft (ideally a 37, if they differ at all among models)? Looking at the bungs in my boat's boxes, it appears that they are attached on TWO sides (not all four, as I would anticipate). Thumper thinks this might be the case.

I am asking because I don't want to dig out the four bungs on two sides that I see, only to find that the boxes won't come off without major work from inside to find other attachment points.
The dorade boxes on my 37 were installed well after the manufacture of the boat, so it may not match the factories method of attachment ( though I don't think it is any different ). The attachment is by screws that are then hidden under the teak plugs along the inboard and outboard edges. There are no attach points along the fore and aft edges. Wooden strips are mounted longitudinally by screws and adhesive to the cabin top and the boxes fit snugly over them. The attach screws for the boxes are then installed through the boxes into the strips. Afterward the teak plugs are installed and shaved down to hide the attach screws.
Removal entails carefully removing the plugs and then the screws. My boxes are also attached with some 3M 4000 sealant, so using a putty knife, or something similar, to separate the sealant from the pieces is required.
It's not a complicated process, just time consuming and requiring some finesse.
 

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The dorade boxes on my 37 were installed well after the manufacture of the boat, so it may not match the factories method of attachment ( though I don't think it is any different ). The attachment is by screws that are then hidden under the teak plugs along the inboard and outboard edges. There are no attach points along the fore and aft edges. Wooden strips are mounted longitudinally by screws and adhesive to the cabin top and the boxes fit snugly over them. The attach screws for the boxes are then installed through the boxes into the strips. Afterward the teak plugs are installed and shaved down to hide the attach screws.
Removal entails carefully removing the plugs and then the screws. My boxes are also attached with some 3M 4000 sealant, so using a putty knife, or something similar, to separate the sealant from the pieces is required.
It's not a complicated process, just time consuming and requiring some finesse.
Many thanks. This is somewhat similar to my setup, except on my boxes the connections are on one fore/aft end and one side of each box (the intake end of each box). The boxes are setup so that one intake is forward and the other is aft, and the boxes are offset, not stationed symmetrically because the intake holes aren't. I think it varies from boat to boat, depending on setup (some owners may request different locations for the intakes) and year of production. Mine is only ten years old, but they have changed at least one thing: now they no longer cover the screw heads with bungs, instead leaving them exposed for easy removal.
 
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