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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I am considering buying a used PSC 34. I have heard that boats from the early and mid-80's had their fair share of osmotic blisters. Does anyone know what year PSC started using vinylester resin? Looking at a 1987 boat.

Thanks,

David
 

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Hi David,
There is a 1986 PSC34 currently for sale and in the description it states that pacific seacraft did not use vinylester resin before 1988.
Regards,
Steve
 

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David,

Unfortunately, the cut-off for vinylester isn't quite so black and white as a date certain, because PSC initially offered vinylester as an option. So there are some boats during the 1988-1989 period that have it, and some that don't.

By 1990 all the boats had vinylester. Most boats built in 1989 will have it too. 1988 boats will be hit or miss (more miss than hit). Pre-1988 boats will not have vinylester.

That said, if the boat your are looking at is more or less blister free (get a survey!), then lack of vinylester would not be a deal breaker for me.
 

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I'll defer to the experts here, but personally I'd tend to be a little worried about not having the vinylester. Given the boat's age, I think I'd at least consider stripping the hull and putting several new barrier coats on of a color different than the fouling paint so I could see if it got scratched or otherwise comprimised along the way.
-MC1
PSC 34 #307
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks

Thank you all for the info and advice. I was looking at a 1987 but maybe I ought to consider a 1990 model. However I will check her for blistering first, cause I really am in love with her.

David
 

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87 blisters?

David,

My 31 is an '88 - well, an 88 the way a car you bought last month will be called a 2009. My boat was built in '87. Pacific Seacraft looked through the records but could not confirm if it had vinylester or not. (Is there a visual way to find out?)

It is in the water 12 months a year (California) and has no sign of blisters. I just had the bottom painted in August and it still looks great.

If you really love the '87 it might be worth the risk if it still looks good. I must admit the prospect of possible blisters someday still makes me a little nervous but I expect to keep loving this boat for life.

John Van Dinther
Watermark
PSC 31 #28
 

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Thank you all for the info and advice. I was looking at a 1987 but maybe I ought to consider a 1990 model. However I will check her for blistering first, cause I really am in love with her.

David
I have an '87. It had an epoxy barrier coat. One season, some years ago, I had the bottom sanded down and reapplied the barrier coat. It's a nasty job, but not hugely expensive. If you don't see blisters, you could have a boatyard sand it (that's the nasty part) and then you could apply the four coats of barrier epoxy yourself. If you see blisters, that's another matter entirely.

My boat is in northern salt water, so less likely to blister, but there are no blisters at all and the hull has no delamination according to a recent survey.
 

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I'd check the boat you're interested in before nixing it permanently. We owned PS 37 #43, delivered new to us in 1983, for over 20 years. The boat developed some minor blisters right around the turn of the bilge and skeg. We had those repaired and and epoxy barrier put on the bottom. We kept the boat for another five years or so in Southern California. When the new (then prospective) owner had the boat surveyed prior to purchasing, there was no problem with blistering.

Sue
PSC 40#60 Fugue
 
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