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It certainly is. I've done a few myself, but not in the dark, with 40 kts wind, and with a canting keel. That will definitely get your attention.
 

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Yup. But Vestas couldn't do one in much more benign conditions to avoid hitting an island. Go figure.
 

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Yup. But Vestas couldn't do one in much more benign conditions to avoid hitting an island. Go figure.
Hard to avoid something you don't know is there. Doesn't excuse the mistake, but we can come up with better jokes than that. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
And now a broken mast. That gybe did not strengthen the mast! Might have contributed to its break.
 

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I'm unfamiliar with the canting keel and why it makes an accidental gybe more difficult to recover from. Can anyone explain? Thanks,
Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Canting keel uses a hydraulic pump to move the keel to windward to increase righting moment. If there is an accidental gybe, the keel is pointing straight down, so the boat will not right itself until the keel is moved to the other side.
 

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Plus they have water ballast : two 800 liter tanks aft (P&S as far outboard as they can make them)and another 1100 liter tank forward on the centerline. Each liter weighs a kilo, and you can bet they're full on what is supposed to be the windward side. Surprise jybe and suddenly you have 800kg on the leeward side, along with the canting keel helping to heel you over even further in the wrong direction.
 

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Plus they have water ballast : two 800 liter tanks aft (P&S as far outboard as they can make them)and another 1100 liter tank forward on the centerline. Each liter weighs a kilo, and you can bet they're full on what is supposed to be the windward side. Surprise jybe and suddenly you have 800kg on the leeward side, along with the canting keel helping to heel you over even further in the wrong direction.
And another 2,000kg of stackable gear in the form of fuel, food, personal safety gear and foulies, sails, etc.
 
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