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Mondofromredondo
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I'm interested in adding an inline water filtration system on Charity Rose to filter water from the onboard tank. I've become tired of storing water all over the place. I'm interested in knowing your impressions of water taste as well as install location. I think my undersink locker is getting a little crowded. Also if I walk away from the boat for a few weeks is the system still considered good to use? Or do I need to run a few gallons thru it prior to drinking anything.
 

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Pacific Seacraft 34
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As part of our refit, we purchased a GE in-line filtration system at Home Depot, for an under sink install. The filter housing was around $36 and the filter canisters are around $40. As best we could tell from our research, the system is widely available from most any hardware or 'big-box' hardware/retailer, such as Home Depot, Lowe's, Target, Wal-Mart, etc.

Here's the link for the canister:

GE Under Counter Standard Filter Unit-GX1S01R at The Home Depot

Here's the link for the filters:

GE Chlorine+Lead+Chemical Undersink Filter-FXUVC at The Home Depot

We also plan to pre-filter using the Shur-Flo filter mentioned above. Of course, the life of the filter depends heavily on the quality of water. For the next two or three years, we'll be using municipal water system water and expect to get a fairly long life from the filters.
 

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^^ Go to Filters Fast
* Pentek 2x10 G3 housing
* Pentek Floplus10 element
NSF 53 certified for cycsts, same performance for ~ 1/3 price.

It's not a difference in quality, it is a matter of buying direct from the company that makes much of the private label filters for many of the big names.

Yes, the elements are interchangeable, though the EXACT specifications and certifications matter.

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Remember, it's not just the filter:
* Clean tank annually. NEVER put antifreeze in the tank; store it dry.
* Filter after hose, because the hose sheds a LOT of algae.
* Screen the vent. Bugs crawl in.
* Chlorinate if needed. best to test occasionally. Pet store or pool store. Not too much if the tank is aluminum (try dichloroisocyanurinate--less corrosive).
* Final filters meeting NSF 53.
 

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We use an inline RV filter to fill tanks and on board filtration by General Ecology.

In-Home Water Purifiers and Micro Water Filters - General Ecology
***** WOW *****

The price of the filters you ref is WAY out there!

We bought a 2 filer (10 micron paper) and carbon block) with UV to use when filling our tanks. The cost was about US $199.00 and then use the PUR for the final at galley. Coat unser US 20.00 and uses about one filter every 3 to 6 months (FULL time live aboard). WAY LESS and the PUR filters seem to be available every where in the world.

Did a You tube of both at;
The PUR ( 2.41 min ) at;
The UV ( 4.31 min ) at;

Greg
 

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We use an under sink type whole house 10 mc filter, fitted with tubing and hose barbs to filter any water going into our tanks on deck. From the tanks we have Pentek fine (5 mc) activated charcoal filters on the discharge side of our manual and electric pressure pumps that deals with water headed to the galley and lavatory fixtures. Drinking water is passed through a final General Ecology "Seagull" type activated charcoal filter under the galley sink. Water going into the tanks is treated with 2 oz of unscented household bleach in each 50 gallon tank. Twenty-four hours after re-filling and chlorinating the tanks we add a solution of AquaBon and water to each tank. The foregoing has kept our water supplies healthy and tasting quite good. (We have refillable water bottles that we fill from the drinking water fixture in the galley and store in the fridge so they're nice and cold when needed for drinking or mixing GatorAid or what have you).

FWIW...
 

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I installed an under-sink, "spool o'string" filtterwhich IIRC is 5 micron? I'd like to say it cleans the water; but only gets out the errant wads, a few spiders and other float-y bits that end up in the tank,

I plan on adding a Sawyer .02 micron "super" filter once funds are availabable. In the meantime, I think another household, charcoal unit will suffice for as much purification as needed for dock well water. Question is; will that get the chlorine "sniff' out of the watter? Usualy only a whiff; but enuff to put one off of drinking it, or making coffee with it..
 

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We put a Seagull filter (General Ecology) under the galley sink with a dedicated spigot onboard JUNO when we bought her 13 years ago and use it for all our drinking and cooking water. We haven't had to buy (and lug) bottled water since. To our tastes, at least, it seems to do a terrific job of removing taste and odor from the water. We ended up putting one in our "land home" as well.

I haven't used or experimented with other filters, so I can't evaluate them, but I will acknowledge that the Seagull filters are not inexpensive...but then so was all that bottled water I used to buy for the boat.

Roger Lopata
JUNO
PSC 40 -- #46
 

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The problem with granulated carbon or 10 micron filters in systems with intermittent chlorination is that they will actually grow bacteria, most probably making things worse.

Please look at the shear economy of the items I have suggested:

^^ Go to Filters Fast. Water filters.net is good too.
* Pentek 2x10 G3 housing = $12-15
* Pentek Floplus10 element = $16. There are other NSF 53 elements, but this gives better flow.
NSF 53 certified for cysts, same performance for ~ 1/3 price of the home Depot/GE element, and 10% the price of Seagull.

https://www.filtersfast.com/P-Pentek-FloPlus-10-Carbon-Block-Water-Filter.asp

Daulton also makes a nice cleanable ceramic OBO element that will fit this housing. A little more, but lasts a LONG time.

They also have a membrane backed filter for that will remove viruses and the lot; same housing. This will all be documented in more detail in an up-coming Practical Sailor article.

Seagull is a very interesting, quality product and was certainly an industry leader, but times have changed, water filtration has grown, and I think they have been left behind by new high-production products. Moreover, though they have done testing, Seagull is neither ANSI, WQA, nor NSF certified for cyst or virus removal. They probably do, but why pay more 5-15x more for a non-certified product? I also like that other products offer interchangeability and world-wide availability.

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Bottom line. If you are really concerned about bacteria and viruses, you MUST chlorinate. ANY filter design can leak if there is a bad o-ring. You will be showering and using other taps that may not have been filtered. If you filter only the cold water side, there is some risk of contamination through the faucet.

If you chlorinate, all you really need to remove are cysts, since only they can resist the chlorine (that is the big deal about cryptosporidium--it can survive chlorine). These are removed by NSF 53 rated filters.

Any carbon filter will remove all of the chlorine taste; the chlorine reacts with the carbon and converted to salt. There should be just enough chlorine to barely smell in the tank the next day; the amount of bleach or treatment chemical required varies a bit with the feed water, and is effectively zero with chlorinated tap water... obviously.

Simple.
 

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...SNIP....
Bottom line. If you are really concerned about bacteria and viruses, you MUST chlorinate. ANY filter design can leak if there is a bad o-ring. You will be showering and using other taps that may not have been filtered. If you filter only the cold water side, there is some risk of contamination through the faucet.
....SNIP.....
Simple.
Warning, IF you are or plan on being a full time cruiser, ANY CHLORINE AT ALL that enters your BIG $$$ water maker WILL destroy your membrane!!! :(

THAT is why we use a UV system that was less than US $200.00 for ANY water that goes into our tanks from any source other than our water maker water.

AND, I might add, the city water supply in the town we have a shore side place had a contamination. We simply used our same portable UV system with NO problems!!!

You can see it at the post I made in this thread with our Youtube videos about our filters.

Greg
 

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^^ Absolutely correct, and UV is a smart answer in that case.

Another alternative, seldom discussed on boats but always in homes, is to put a carbon filter in front of the membrane, to eliminate chlorine. This would be a standard installation. Since only the purge water would go through this element, it would last forever; carbon is very good with chlorine.

Not being able to take on tap water seems like a sacrifice. Many harbors are not suitable for RO feed. Without chlorination it will be difficult to maintain robust water safety, since UV will not inactivate cysts and because the UV treatment is typically only on the galley tap.

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In the US this is all overkill, of course. But if you want to be complete, everything must be considered.
 

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Daulton also makes a nice cleanable ceramic OBO element that will fit this housing. A little more, but lasts a LONG time.
Have you used a ceramic sub-micron filter in a standard pressure water system on a boat PD? I wonder how often you need to clean the filter, and what kind of PSI is required to maintain a decent flow.

In my canoe tripping days we always carried a hand pumped Katadyn ceramic filter. It worked great, and was rated to bacteria-level stuff (but not virus). It did get clogged over time, and required a periodic scrubbing.
 

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^^ Absolutely correct, and UV is a smart answer in that case.

Another alternative, seldom discussed on boats but always in homes, is to put a carbon filter in front of the membrane, to eliminate chlorine. This would be a standard installation. Since only the purge water would go through this element, it would last forever; carbon is very good with chlorine.

Not being able to take on tap water seems like a sacrifice. Many harbors are not suitable for RO feed. Without chlorination it will be difficult to maintain robust water safety, since UV will not inactivate cysts and because the UV treatment is typically only on the galley tap.

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In the US this is all overkill, of course. But if you want to be complete, everything must be considered.
Our water maker does have a carbon block (NOT granules) filter between the fresh water flush (from our tanks). But I still worry. And we also NEVER run the water make in a harbor. ONLY in open clean (sort of) water.

If you watch the short video of our shore side water filter system you see it has a 10 micron paper filter AND a carbon block filter in it before the water passes through the UV. I also added a valve in the supply side so I can slow the flow to insure ample UV time for the water.

I might add that more than one time we have seen VERY BAD water coming from the dock, IN THE USA! :eek: At least in Mexico they told you the dock water was not potable.

In 1013 I connected up our system and shortly after starting to fill our tank the flow almost stopped. When I inspected the water coming from the dock, IT WAS MUD! When I went to the office and asked, they said, "Oh yes, we had a break in a dock line and Delta water was sucked into the lines. The also use a cistern for supply and when it was low, the water went very bad!

BAD on me for not testing the water before connecting up the system, but earlier that morning, it was fine!

And as I said, we have even used the system at our shore side house when the city warned of e-coli in the water. :eek: :eek: :eek:

BUT, if you are not going foreign and only day sailing, it's not needed. ;)

But, FOR US, I would NEVER fill my tanks without using some type of filter BEFORE my tanks.

Greg
 

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Have you used a ceramic sub-micron filter in a standard pressure water system on a boat PD? I wonder how often you need to clean the filter, and what kind of PSI is required to maintain a decent flow.

In my canoe tripping days we always carried a hand pumped Katadyn ceramic filter. It worked great, and was rated to bacteria-level stuff (but not virus). It did get clogged over time, and required a periodic scrubbing.
Mike,

Not directed at me, but I have a bit of first hand info.

When we were in Mexico, we had friends on 5 boats that had the ceramic filters. Of the five, 3 were broken during the first year of use. They were clogging up fast and had to be cleaned often. A bit more care might have prevented this. Also, I know of one that was repaired with epoxy.

The problem was that there was only one place in the boonies that had pressure water so people would line up to fill. Makes the people want to make sure they did not hold up the others to much.

Greg
 

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When we were in Mexico, we had friends on 5 boats that had the ceramic filters. Of the five, 3 were broken during the first year of use. They were clogging up fast and had to be cleaned often. A bit more care might have prevented this. Also, I know of one that was repaired with epoxy.

The problem was that there was only one place in the boonies that had pressure water so people would line up to fill. Makes the people want to make sure they did not hold up the others to much.
Thanks Greg. Clogging fast is what I'd fear. Seems like the pre-filter, then chlorine in the tank, then carbon filter, might be the easiest option (although I like your UV system).

I didn't consider that filter breakage would be the major problem on a sailboat. Clogging yes, but breakage? Hadn't considered that. As I mentioned, we used one for all our wilderness canoeing/kayaking and I never broke the ceramic. You do have to handle them with care, but once inside the housing I'd think they'd be pretty secure.
 
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