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1999 Beneteau 50
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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to find an adapter to plug our water fill hose into the deck fill. We have been living aboard for 4 years and would like to start taking showers aboard instead of constantly walking to the Marina office. Since there are four of us, we'll have to refill our tanks frequently. It would be nice to have the water hose already plumbed into the water system. Is there a commercially available adapter that would work, or will I need to experiment with various fittings?

I suppose companies are reluctant to market such an adapter, out of liability concerns.

I don't plan to leave the water running all the time, but having the house already hooked up will save a lot of hassle.
 

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The tank fill?

You realize that the tank will fill and the water will pour out the vent. If the vent is outside, the water will run all the time. If the vent blocks the tank will rupture and the boat will sink. If the vent is inside it depends; the boat will sink if it is not in the sink, and it may sink if the sink drain cannot keep up.

The other option is to attach it to the pressure side. You need to regulate the pressure, because it may exceed the boat's plumbing rating. If something ruptures the boat may sink.

I had fun with that! Yes, it is absolutely doable, I just wanted to make clear that there are concerns and things that must be done right. You always turn the water off when you leave the boat. Running off tank water, the most that can end up in the bilge is the tank volume. With city water there is no limit, and I saw a guy sink his boat that way (left the hose in the filler and went home).
 

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Pay up your insurance first.

A failure could give an unlimited supply of water. Leave it turned on.....go to dinner and come back to find your boat sunk in its slip. To me not the risk for the litttle in onvienece of filling the tank manually.
 

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Try explaining that one to the insurance company. well I hooked up a water hose to the boat and left it on. At least when at the slip they don't sink very far down.
 

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Read all of the way to the end of his post. I don't believe that he is talking about leaving the water on full-time to pressurize the system. He was just talking about leaving the hose attached so that when the tank gets to be empty, all he has to do is step on the dock, turn the faucet on, fill the tank, and shut it off.

He said:

"I don't plan to leave the water running all the time, but having the house already hooked up will save a lot of hassle.


He's just looking to skip the steps of having to open the fill inlet, uncoil the hose, put it in, turn it on, remove it, coil the hose back, put the cap back on.
That's how I read it anyway.
 

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I wouldn't want to fully rely on the vent, by having the deck fill sealed, even if this is just to top up. If the vent clogs or becomes overwhelmed by hose pressure, something will break.

If you must, plumb one of these into the pressurized side of the fresh water system. They are pressure regulated. This is just an example, they are made in various finishes and with various plumbing connections. You have to be able to shut off the fresh water tank, so it doesn't backfill. Most already have this capability.

https://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?name=shurflo-water-pressure-regulator&path=-1|51|2234261|2234266&id=10361

As mentioned, the risk is that you have a rupture aboard and the dock water runs into your boat perpetually. They must be shut off, at the dock, when away.

An advantage of having a city water adapter is being able to attach a compressor in the Fall and blow out the water lines, rather than load with antifreeze. That's all ours is ever used for.
 

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If your crew likes hot showers... more cold water will not solve THAT problem.
 

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On a side note, not knowing your situation....

Stay with marina hot showers.
Yeah, its winter...i know.

If you can keep showers off your boat without going crazy, do that
 

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Great idea, Pro side if you can turn off the shore tap before the vessel settles, it's fresh water so less trouble,Just change the engine oil. On the negative side the oil that was in the engine is now in the for'd bunk and settee cushions.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I only intend to run the water to refill the tank. I plan to drill a weep hole into the adapter, to protect against over filling.

So far, it sounds like my adapter doesn't exist, at least not off the shelf.
 

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I only intend to run the water to refill the tank. I plan to drill a weep hole into the adapter, to protect against over filling.

So far, it sounds like my adapter doesn't exist, at least not off the shelf.

It doesn't exist off the shelf.

My boat has a split water tank.

The previous owners, Sunsail, must have routinely stuffed the hose down the filler hole and hit the water pressure high. The plastic tanks get a pressure bubble of air that does them in.

It's an incredibly difficult type of plastic to repair.

Your weep hole will not drop the pressure much, IMHO.

A hose going in an inch leaving the rest of the filler pipe open should be OK. But only allow the water to trickle in.

One other point.... Winter showers on board will increase the condensation a lot.
 

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There is indeed an off the shelf adaptor that connects a garden hose to a water system on a boat. When attached, the pump is turned off and the shore water pressure replaces it. They normally come with a pressure reducer to ensure your plumbing doesn't bow apart with dockside pressures. The tanks are not involved in this system.
I 've often used them over the years, but I'll always turn off the dock water if I'm leaving the boat for an extended period.
 

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How much water do you need for a shower? What is the capacity of your tanks and your water heater?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How much water do you need for a shower?
Great Question. I would guess about five gallons. We hold about 75 gallons but there are four of us living on board. The water heater holds 10 gallons but the water is much hotter than household temp.

Admittedly, my wife is not blown away either, with the thought of showering aboard.
 

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A 5 gallon navy shower would be pretty luxurious and doubt it would even fit in the sump all at once. I would feel pretty comfy with 2 gals. I bet I could pull off one gallon, on a dare.
 

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I would like to find an adapter to plug our water fill hose into the deck fill. We have been living aboard for 4 years and would like to start taking showers aboard instead of constantly walking to the Marina office. Since there are four of us, we'll have to refill our tanks frequently. It would be nice to have the water hose already plumbed into the water system. Is there a commercially available adapter that would work, or will I need to experiment with various fittings?

I suppose companies are reluctant to market such an adapter, out of liability concerns.

I don't plan to leave the water running all the time, but having the house already hooked up will save a lot of hassle.
I only intend to run the water to refill the tank. I plan to drill a weep hole into the adapter, to protect against over filling.

So far, it sounds like my adapter doesn't exist, at least not off the shelf.
Glossa,

The deck fittings for our water tanks are standard 1-1/4" pipe threads. We purchased a 90° elbow [schedule 40 PVC] and a short pipe nipple [a street elbow would be great, but we couldn't find one...] Thread the nipple into the elbow tightly. Then loosly thread the nipple into the deck fitting with the open end of the elbow facing aft.

The reason for a 90° elbow is to help prevent bird strafing runs from finding their way into the tank... Likewise for anything washing down the deck...

We put the potable water hose into the open side of the elbow.

We refined this over time by adding a shutoff valve on the boat end of the hose [and a pressure regulator on the dock side...] Also on the boat end valve there is a barbed hose fitting with about 6 inches of 1/2 inch clear hose on it. That is so the clear hose can be inserted into the open end of the elbow and bend around the radius ultimately aiming straight down [inside the elbow] That prevents water from dripping back on deck [undesirable in freezing conditions... ] as it did with just the hose coupling layed inside the elbow opening.

Wither way, the hose end is a loose fit inside the elbow [i.e., not threaded together with any fitting...] so if the vent was cloged for some reason, the water can excape from the deck fill.

In freezing weather you learn to turn the hose on just a trickle to keep the tank full without the hose freezing up.

Our set up is easy to monitor because our water tank vents drain into the galley sink, so we know when they are full. [This was done when the watermaker was installed...]

It is important to only use potable water hose, and sanitize it occasionally so you don't get growth in the hose from sitting water... [We also filter all our drinking water at the tap as a precaution.]

All this takes much longer to explain than to execute...

In case this is of interest.

Cheers! Bill
 
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