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Keith,

That problem was more common with the older oval portlights. This is the first instance where I've heard this problem arising on the newer design. While the newer design theoretically should be less prone to this problem, it's possible we'll begin to see issues with them as they get further along in age.

The rectangular portlights came from Chatfield Engineering in Aukland, NZ. Your dockmate might contact them about replacement lenses.

Otherwise a local glass shop might be his best bet. I would recommend polycarbonate or acrylic instead of laminated safety glass.
 

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John,
Currently waiting on Thumper from PSC as he may have a source.

I have the older Oval shaped portlights on my 1988 PSC 34.
I understand the change to the new style occured in 1990. Not sure if the double pane was used in all models because of problems.

What would be the rationale for using Polycarb or acrylic over safety glass?

Keith
Keith the rectangular PSC/Chatfield portlights came into use in the late 1980's. I've seen 1989 models that were built in '88 with the rectangulars. There was a short period where owners could opt for the old oval portlights instead of the new ones. So you will come across '89 boats with the ovals. But I think the majority of '89s were rectangular.

My suggestion to use polycarbonate (Lexan) or acrylic for lens replacement rather than the safety glass is based on my own experiences. Because of their design, the laminated glass in the older oval portlights was especially prone to wicking moisture between the layers when the lens bedding deteriorated-- which results in the foggy/cloudy lens syndrome.

Also, I had an oval lens spider-web on me when a large portlight accidentally slammed shut. I wanted to eliminate the possibility of this happenning again.

So when I rebuilt the oval portlights on our previous Dana 24, I decided not to replace with safety glass. I went with a single, thicker lens made of acrylic. Polycarbonate is stronger, but more susceptible to UV damage. I reasoned that the acrylic was adequately strong for the size of the relatively small portlight lenses, and would last longer than polycarbonate (which would eventually craze from UV exposure).
 

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PF,
Thanks for the input. Am looking at all the options but safety glass is my preference as I have a local glass shop that claims they can cut the glass to the same dimensions. Not sure about the installation of the glass yet but your idea for sealing the edges makes very good sense.

Thanks
Keith
S/V Charity Rose
Keith,

Just FYI, your local glass shop should be able to cut whatever material you choose - safety glass, acrylic, polycarbonate. I got our replacement acrylic lenses from the local shop.

Do your research on how to bed the lenses. The bronze in our portlights reacts with certain acidic bedding compounds. I used a non-acidic silicone, which was not easy to find. You may come up with a better solution.
 
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