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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So the question is, in my renovations of an older boat and intend on going for long voyages. In your opinion. What do you all think of removing ONE of two water tanks and replacing it with a fuel tank and than buying a water maker? More fuel but less water holding.
 

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If your long voyages are far enough off shore... you could eliminate or at least minimize the holding tank...
 
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I guess my question would be, what are you trying to accomplish? If you have to run a watermaker, then you're going to be forced to run the engine more, and therefore you will need more fuel. Of course, in the end you may not be able to motor any farther than before, because you will be using more fuel to make water.

If you were planning on motoring all the time anyway... Well then I guess I'm with joethecobbler. What's the point of having a sailboat, if the plan is to motor all the time anyway?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
My goal is to avoid the clutter on deck by needing less fuel containers. I have no intention on "motoring" excessively unless the wind dies for extended amount of time. I do have several solar panels and a wind gen good to go to help with power use. I just figured less fuel containers on deck needed less unwanted clutter.

I guess I should note, I am prepping for my first ocean crossing after a few years of coasting :) So excited!

Thanks for the input so far though, I do appreciate it.
 

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Barquito
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Just to keep this discussion real, could I ask what kind of boat we are talking about here? In general, I would say everything on a boat is a trade-off. If that fits how you want to sail, then go for it.
 

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so the question is, in my renovations of an older boat and intend on going for long voyages. In your opinion. What do you all think of removing one of two water tanks and replacing it with a fuel tank and than buying a water maker? More fuel but less water holding.
never ever:d serioulsy

having said that its done all the time
 
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Old as Dirt!
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So the question is, in my renovations of an older boat and intend on going for long voyages. In your opinion. What do you all think of removing ONE of two water tanks and replacing it with a fuel tank and than buying a water maker? More fuel but less water holding.
Considering the cost of a water-maker and the rarity of actually needing it, and the cost of maintaining it when not needed, another, less costly option, might be to remove one "hard" water tank and replace it with two bladder tanks, one on top of, or side-by-side with, the other, one for water the other fuel. With such an arrangement one would have the option of taking on extra fuel, or water, or some of each, as conditions dictate. On a long passage where one might be confronted with extended periods of light or adverse airs, it might be advantageous to be able to motor for an extended period, cutting down ones transit time and, accordingly, reducing the need for water supplies. Likewise, one might be better served by being able to carry relatively more water where "safe" water supplies are less frequently available.

Just a thought...
 
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Mermaid Hunter
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So the question is, in my renovations of an older boat and intend on going for long voyages. In your opinion. What do you all think of removing ONE of two water tanks and replacing it with a fuel tank and than buying a water maker? More fuel but less water holding.
An Ericson 30 would not be my first choice of a cruising boat, much less a voyager. To each their own.

If no one has already changed it you're starting with 25 gallons of fuel and 25 gallons of water. That is really skimpy for both. Are you going to be alone?

Given the choice between water and fuel on a sailboat I'd go with water. You can't drink fuel. The wind will return sooner or later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I appreciate all the advice y'all, this noob may have many more questions. SVAuspicious I know it is not the ideal open water but it is what I can afford and I have grown to love my boat. Yes I will be alone. I am working on capacity which is the reason of the post. But thank you.
 

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I appreciate all the advice y'all, this noob may have many more questions. SVAuspicious I know it is not the ideal open water but it is what I can afford and I have grown to love my boat. Yes I will be alone. I am working on capacity which is the reason of the post. But thank you.
Perhaps we can help you. Lots of us have lots of experience. Some of us almost as much as we think. *grin*

Tell us about you, where you are located, and what your plans and dreams are. We'll help you sort things out and put you in a better position to make good decisions.
 

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Of course, they say you can make water, you can't make fuel.

However, what kind of long voyages are we talking about? Coastal or offshore? The advantage of fuel, when offshore, is to be able to keep moving along and potentially taking days off of a passage. That could mean avoiding serious weather. Fuel can be safety.

However, most cruisers are not that far offshore. If you are within a day of fuel, I would keep the water. On another safety point, I would always want at least two separate significant fresh water supplies, in the event one leaked. Way more comfortable.
 
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Of course, they say you can make water, you can't make fuel.
And it also doesn't rain fuel.

But would I replace a water tank with a fuel tank? Well I guess the argument that you can't make fuel is easily countered by "You can't drink it, shower in it, wash clothes in it, cook with it, mix your scotch with it, geez this list is endless, either".

Unless you're going to be at sea for long stretches in areas of scant rain, a lot of water on board isn't really necessary. We keep 20 litres of bottled water as an "ultimate backup" when everything else goes tits-up. It's really not so much about running out as it is about contamination.

Having said that, we hold 1000 litres of water in three tanks when full and have a watermaker so I guess I'm not qualified for this argument.

Also to an earlier post, don't believe that you can run a watermaker off a solar array unless it is really big array and supporting a large battery bank. Watermakers suck juice. I have a 280W solar array and a wind gen but when the watermaker runs so does the engine.
 
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Courtney the Dancer
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In your boat with the size tanks people have mentioned I think you will either be cluttering the deck with fuel jugs or water anyway (both most likely) and you already have the water tank. Leave it and design your systems around not needing the engine.
 

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We carry about 300 gallons of water and 170 of fuel. With a 40 gph watermaker, it is actually difficult to keep the water fresh in both tanks and use the watermaker enough.
Every time I consider what you are considering, I remind myself that, though very reliable, the watermaker is a complicated bit of tech, running at high pressure.
The only reason to covert a water tank to fuel, IMO would be to stock up when fuel is cheap, which is not a matter of life and death. However a failure of the watermaker on a crossing and the lack of that second tank of water, could very well become a matter of life and death.
Much better to squeeze in a bladder tank somewhere and keep the water aboard.
 

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If the OP literally means gasoline for an A4 rather than diesel fuel oil, that pretty much triples or quadruples the size of the fuel tankage compared to a diesel engine.

Isntalling Vetus bladders (blivets) below for both extra drinking water and gasoline might be a way to go, as opposed to installing large permanent tankage "forever", or an expensive watermaker, which of course will still need a power supply which could mean more fuel again.
 
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