SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
We are considering buying a very inexpensive boat, but the issue is the cost of getting it 5 hours north, which will probably cost a lot more than the boat! It is a '75 O'Day, 22 feet long, with a shoal draft keel.

And suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I don't even know who to call to get quotes!

Nancy
 

·
Wandering Aimlessly
Joined
·
22,036 Posts
You don't say if it has a trailer. Nor whether you have water access to your destination. Both would be helpful to know.

If you don't have a trailer for it, it would certainly be worth the expense to find and purchase one. Not only to move it, but for haul-out during the winter, or if you need to work on the boat during the season. That would be my recommendation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,249 Posts
A trailer is definitely the way to go. So look at renting one if you don't want to buy one. You will need a decent tow vehicle - truck or larger SUV.

I had an Oday 22 many years ago (with a trailer). When I moved to Long Island from New Jersey, I had to move it. Friend with a truck helped me as I really didn't have a vehicle suitable for trailering that far. You are looking at a load of about 3000 lbs (boat, trailer and equipment).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,092 Posts
Going to need a trailer anyway, as others pointed out.

If, for some reason, that's not going to happen, sailing up the Hudson should be on everyone's bucket list anyway. Often motoring, but the scenery is remarkable. Even if you got a good way and had her hauled for a shorter trip home, it may reduce cost. Not sure where you are, but the Erie Canal is open this time of year too.
 

·
Freedom isn't free
Joined
·
3,133 Posts
There are tons of keelboat trailers available on craigslist, but you must be willing to travel a bit to get them... I found a few around $1500 around Annapolis, single axle size...
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,622 Posts
Dont buy it! It will cost more to get a trailer then buy one with a trailer
 
  • Like
Reactions: killarney_sailor

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,641 Posts
"Yes, but this price was right. "
Well then, the price must have included a trailer, right?

If the boat is where you can't use it, the price isn't right until you've paid the WHOLE price. Delivery included.

Rule #1 about cheap boats: There's always a gotcha.

Look around the boatyards and clubs in your area (one hopes there are some?) or try to find other owners. If anyone already has a trailer that will do, offer to pay them to come down with you and fetch the boat back. Because anyone else, from anywhere else, is still going to charge you for a round trip to wherever they operate out of.
 

·
Captain Obvious
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
The INITIAL price might be low, but the cost is going up fast.. I see them around here in the $2500 - $5000 range with a motor and trailer, in good shape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,092 Posts
Core penetration? I would be seriously skeptical. For starters, that's just what you found, there will be more surprises, plus cost to transport, etc. You would be much better off finding one without issues that is nearby, even if you pay more upfront.

The trouble with boats in this price range, is they're often worth less than zero. In good shape, they might be worth several thousand, but they have thousands in needed repairs, so the value is negative. Buyer beware.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nancyleeny

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Core penetration? I would be seriously skeptical. For starters, that's just what you found, there will be more surprises, plus cost to transport, etc. You would be much better off finding one without issues that is nearby, even if you pay more upfront.

The trouble with boats in this price range, is they're often worth less than zero. In good shape, they might be worth several thousand, but they have thousands in needed repairs, so the value is negative. Buyer beware.
Yup, we're learning that quickly.

And actually, the second afternoon of our lessons, after being on a Soling for a day and a half, we went out on a 26 foot S2. My very tall husband loved it! He did most of the skippering that afternoon, so I didn't get to feel how it responded, but he said it was much more comfortable and not as hair trigger responsive as the Soling. I should probably wait until we can save up for a boat like that.

Thanks, all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Nancy,

Maybe our experiences over the past year and a half will be helpful to you. We're fairly new to sailing, and bought our first boat (other than a decrepit Sunfish with a waterlogged hull) about a year and a half ago.

We'd been dreaming for a few years and frequently stopping in at a local place that always had older used trailerable sailboats for sale, typically 22' Catalinas, Hunters, and O'Days from the 1970s. Our initial reaction was that we couldn't believe we could afford so much boat for under $3000! They weren't in bad shape although there were usually a few things that needed attending to, and most included an outboard and trailer. After doing a little digging around and sailing with a friend on a 30' S2, however, we decided to see what we could afford in a slightly larger boat.

We found two 26' Pearsons fairly close to us. One was about thirty minutes from our house, in the water on a smallish lake in a nice working marina with helpful people running the marina, with an asking price of $5000. The boat was very tired and needed a LOT of attention; soft spots in the decks, spider cracks every where, poorly done "customizations," and just generally very much "used." Still, it had a 15hp Merc on it and it was on the water sailing. We kept looking.

The other 26' Pearson was almost two hours away from us and it had been on the hard for maybe 5 years at a marina right on Lake Ontario. Asking price was also $5000. It looked to be in much better condition, and we had a good, very experienced friend with a beautiful boat in another marina only a could hundred yards away across the small bay. He came over, helped us look the boat over, and gave his OK... "This'll work. Offer him $1500." What? He's asking $5000! I didn't want to insult the owner, so I offered him $2500. He jumped at it like a starving dog jumps at a steak. I should have listened to my friend. At the time, I thought I had STOLEN this beautiful boat!

Here's what I've got into my almost free, stolen boat so far that I paid a paltry $2500 for. I've done ALL of the work myself. I shudder to think what the labor would have been.

Total rebuild of 8hp Johnson Sailmaster lower half - $250 in parts
New gas tank and hose - $75
New running rigging - $300
New sails - $2000 (main, working jib, 150% genoa)
New bulkheads, mast support crossbeam, and two compression posts - $300 worth of white oak (beam and posts) and Russian Birch plywood (bulkhead)... and a TON of time.
Rewiring of mast, including new deck and steaming combo light - $150
New battery - $90 (we've got a great "blemished" battery store near us; the same battery at West Marine was over $200).

That's all the stuff that was NEEDED, although we could have lived with the sails that were included with the boat. The jib was too small, as was the main, and they were both very badly stained and pretty much shot. The previous owner was nice enough to "throw in a genoa, too!" but it turned out the genoa was for a furling system (which we don't have) and in three tattered pieces. Great. How nice of him. We did sail it a few times on the old jib and main, and it was fine for learning. The new sails were more of a treat for us after all the hard work of getting it finally back on the water again.

There's a ton of other stuff that's more regular maintenance-related; epoxy supplies, bottom paint, compound, wax, etc. Basically, though, without the sails, we HAD to put over $1000 in parts and probably 40 hours of work into the boat. I'm not complaining; it was my responsibility as a buyer to be aware of that stuff. The fact that I missed a lot of it was my fault and I just consider it another lesson learned. Yeah, it would have been nice if the previous owner had been honest, but hey... unfortunately, not everyone is.

I'm still fixing leaky portlights and replacing the head, but other than that the major stuff is all set.

NOW.. here's why I'm writing. My original plan was to get this boat (about 2 hours away via highway, or 3 days away via Lake Ontario and canals) down to the small marina nearer to my house so I could work on it and use it frequently instead of making the two hour drive every time I wanted to sail or work on the boat. The quotes I got to move it were all over $1000, so I didn't. I probably should have, but my pea brain was still in the "I'm not paying almost half what I paid for the whole boat just to move the @#$# thing!" mode. Instead, it's still at the far away marina, and I haven't driven up to it NEARLY as much as I should.

In addition to the purchase price and additional parts, I've also spent about $2500 at the marina where it's located; two winter storages, one season's slip fees, shrink wrapping, stepping and unstepping the mast, one launch, and one haulout.

Sooo.. my $2500 steal-of-a-boat has cost me, not including labor, about $6500 so far, and I've owned it for a year and a half. Granted, it's going to get a little better now that the major stuff is pretty much fixed, but the "birth process" can be rough. The fact that the boat is not local to me really eats at me. The sailing and opportunities where it IS are much better and more plentiful. However, if I did move it here we'd be using it many times a week. Tough call.

Main points?

1. Location, location, location. Buy where you ARE, if at all possible. Boats in the range that you're looking at should be pretty plentiful most places. I may even have been better off buying the boat that I thought was a basket case just because it was here.

2. Triple the price of the boat in your mind, unless it's truly beautiful and very well kept up with great maintenance records. In that case, the price is probably already at least doubled anyway.

3. If going for a trailer sailer, make sure it has a trailer included and a good outboard. If you end up going for a keel boat, you'll need stands or a cradle. The cradle included with my boat, turns out, doesn't really fit my boat correctly and it's not adjustable. I'm STILL trying to figure out how to solve that.

Well.. that's enough for now, I guess. Take your time; you'll find the right boat. If it's far away but it's the right boat, factor in the price of getting it to where you want it and go for it.

Best to you.. good luck!

Barry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Nancy,

Maybe our experiences over the past year and a half will be helpful to you. We're fairly new to sailing, and bought our first boat (other than a decrepit Sunfish with a waterlogged hull) about a year and a half ago.

We'd been dreaming for a few years and frequently stopping in at a local place that always had older used trailerable sailboats for sale, typically 22' Catalinas, Hunters, and O'Days from the 1970s. Our initial reaction was that we couldn't believe we could afford so much boat for under $3000! They weren't in bad shape although there were usually a few things that needed attending to, and most included an outboard and trailer. After doing a little digging around and sailing with a friend on a 30' S2, however, we decided to see what we could afford in a slightly larger boat.

We found two 26' Pearsons fairly close to us. One was about thirty minutes from our house, in the water on a smallish lake in a nice working marina with helpful people running the marina, with an asking price of $5000. The boat was very tired and needed a LOT of attention; soft spots in the decks, spider cracks every where, poorly done "customizations," and just generally very much "used." Still, it had a 15hp Merc on it and it was on the water sailing. We kept looking.

The other 26' Pearson was almost two hours away from us and it had been on the hard for maybe 5 years at a marina right on Lake Ontario. Asking price was also $5000. It looked to be in much better condition, and we had a good, very experienced friend with a beautiful boat in another marina only a could hundred yards away across the small bay. He came over, helped us look the boat over, and gave his OK... "This'll work. Offer him $1500." What? He's asking $5000! I didn't want to insult the owner, so I offered him $2500. He jumped at it like a starving dog jumps at a steak. I should have listened to my friend. At the time, I thought I had STOLEN this beautiful boat!

Here's what I've got into my almost free, stolen boat so far that I paid a paltry $2500 for. I've done ALL of the work myself. I shudder to think what the labor would have been.

Total rebuild of 8hp Johnson Sailmaster lower half - $250 in parts
New gas tank and hose - $75
New running rigging - $300
New sails - $2000 (main, working jib, 150% genoa)
New bulkheads, mast support crossbeam, and two compression posts - $300 worth of white oak (beam and posts) and Russian Birch plywood (bulkhead)... and a TON of time.
Rewiring of mast, including new deck and steaming combo light - $150
New battery - $90 (we've got a great "blemished" battery store near us; the same battery at West Marine was over $200).

That's all the stuff that was NEEDED, although we could have lived with the sails that were included with the boat. The jib was too small, as was the main, and they were both very badly stained and pretty much shot. The previous owner was nice enough to "throw in a genoa, too!" but it turned out the genoa was for a furling system (which we don't have) and in three tattered pieces. Great. How nice of him. We did sail it a few times on the old jib and main, and it was fine for learning. The new sails were more of a treat for us after all the hard work of getting it finally back on the water again.

There's a ton of other stuff that's more regular maintenance-related; epoxy supplies, bottom paint, compound, wax, etc. Basically, though, without the sails, we HAD to put over $1000 in parts and probably 40 hours of work into the boat. I'm not complaining; it was my responsibility as a buyer to be aware of that stuff. The fact that I missed a lot of it was my fault and I just consider it another lesson learned. Yeah, it would have been nice if the previous owner had been honest, but hey... unfortunately, not everyone is.

I'm still fixing leaky portlights and replacing the head, but other than that the major stuff is all set.

NOW.. here's why I'm writing. My original plan was to get this boat (about 2 hours away via highway, or 3 days away via Lake Ontario and canals) down to the small marina nearer to my house so I could work on it and use it frequently instead of making the two hour drive every time I wanted to sail or work on the boat. The quotes I got to move it were all over $1000, so I didn't. I probably should have, but my pea brain was still in the "I'm not paying almost half what I paid for the whole boat just to move the @#$# thing!" mode. Instead, it's still at the far away marina, and I haven't driven up to it NEARLY as much as I should.

In addition to the purchase price and additional parts, I've also spent about $2500 at the marina where it's located; two winter storages, one season's slip fees, shrink wrapping, stepping and unstepping the mast, one launch, and one haulout.

Sooo.. my $2500 steal-of-a-boat has cost me, not including labor, about $6500 so far, and I've owned it for a year and a half. Granted, it's going to get a little better now that the major stuff is pretty much fixed, but the "birth process" can be rough. The fact that the boat is not local to me really eats at me. The sailing and opportunities where it IS are much better and more plentiful. However, if I did move it here we'd be using it many times a week. Tough call.

Main points?

1. Location, location, location. Buy where you ARE, if at all possible. Boats in the range that you're looking at should be pretty plentiful most places. I may even have been better off buying the boat that I thought was a basket case just because it was here.

2. Triple the price of the boat in your mind, unless it's truly beautiful and very well kept up with great maintenance records. In that case, the price is probably already at least doubled anyway.

3. If going for a trailer sailer, make sure it has a trailer included and a good outboard. If you end up going for a keel boat, you'll need stands or a cradle. The cradle included with my boat, turns out, doesn't really fit my boat correctly and it's not adjustable. I'm STILL trying to figure out how to solve that.

Well.. that's enough for now, I guess. Take your time; you'll find the right boat. If it's far away but it's the right boat, factor in the price of getting it to where you want it and go for it.

Best to you.. good luck!

Barry
Hi Barry,
We have a SeaRay 20 foot powerboat which I hate, and my husband's friend always laughs and tells us, "BOAT." Break Out Another Thousand when you have a boat. I laughed. Haha!!

I was hoping a sailboat wasn't as ridiculously expensive. Seems I was kidding myself again.

Thank you for sharing that. I had no idea. Whew!! Maybe this summer we should really concentrate on sailing for free, on race crews. Except that I still am very new, so I wouldn't want to screw them up. Sigh.

Nancy
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top