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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Love is always trouble isn't it! My wife and I have been on a many year lookout for the PNW machine of our dreams. We love older designs, but long trips and 2 kids are the ingredients and it always seemed to push us to more production designs like a Cat 34/36 or some such. Not that we don't love them but we have been considering nightly turndowns of the dinette to get something with more character like a Tayana 37.

But then we find these...



1969 Cheoy Lee Offshore 40 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

and

Offshore 40 Sloop -- Cheoy Lee

Seems that this clicks all the boxes for us as a family, sailors and lovers of wood. They have a great rear cabin with two berths that would be PERFECT for the girls. Then it just comes down to if we fit in the fore cabin. I know about the wood upkeep, but what about them as sailors? They seem to be well regarded out there but it is a 3/4 keel and won't likely be fast. Or do I have this all wrong? Keep in mind that we are used to small production boats (25-35) vs anything like this.

Both have had recent rebuilds on the Perkins.

The second one has done an odd encapsulation of the teak decks that makes me nervous instead of removing them. Any thoughts on that?

Plan for us is to move the boat up here, next summer as an all summer inside passage trip and to buy early enough to be able to shakedown before.

Usually people ask for the sailnetters to talk them out of something. Hey! Talk us into it! :p
 

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They are beautiful boats.
 

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An old friend of mine has sailed 40K Nm on his and is currently at anchor in Thailand. Plenty of boat for you to explore the world. Good luck and good sailing! In the trades you will easily average 150 nm a day...

Can you explain the "odd encapsulation" of the teak decks? Could be cause for concern, as to what may be lurking below.
 

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the are beautiful boats but realize regardless of the write ups they are O L D er boats
 

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Get Matt Harris or the guys at Reisner & McEwen to do the survey. They are well acquainted with boats produced in Taiwan.
 
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the are beautiful boats but realize regardless of the write ups they are O L D er boats
Yeah, nobody needs to own any older boat, who doesn't enjoy working on boats, unless they have deep pockets. :)

But, I find that working on my boat gives me almost as much pleasure as sailing it. :)
 
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Wait a minute... Those boats have offset companionways... Don't you realize you're gonna DIE ???

(grin, bigtime)

Glen Wakefield's Offshore seemed to serve him pretty well on his first attempt at a non-stop circumnavigation, until he was rolled and injured in extreme conditions E of the Falklands, so they must be a pretty weatherly boat...

Kim Chow Around the World Circumnavigation

As always, so much depends on your intended use... An offset companionway should by no means necessarily be a deal-breaker, but just be aware that it is not a desirable characteristic in a boat intended to be sailed offshore. Reading Joe Minick's account in PS of being knocked down in a severe storm while at anchor in Greece aboard his Mason 44 drives home the vulnerabilty of such offset companionways, and how easily downflooding can occur if all things conspire to go exactly wrong...

Those are lovely boats, easy to see why you're so attracted... Good luck, but I agree with aventyr60, I suspect little good could come over the long term from that one with the "encapsulated deck", you'd at least want a surveyor take a VERY close look at that work...
 

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do it! the 40 was one of the better designed cheoy lees...

ps. are you saying the second pic or link withthe white decks did a glass over of the teak decks?

ok this was a common thing HOWEVER

you must make sure they removed the actual teak and glassed over the ply sub deck

if the just glassed over the deck, caulking and all thats a recipe for disaster as the teal decks will creep from expansion and contraction not to mention once the caulking fails you have a million gaps of air and such that will expand and contract etc...

not saying its already happened but beware...if the actual teak planks were removed and then the sub deck glassed over thats been done many times sometimes with beatiful results.

in any case back to thos boats I really loved them...

Id check the sloop out, the yawl version mast however is good for radar and stuff...but not very effective sail wise.
 
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the overall condition of the first one is much better...its also a better buy...
 
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Ain't it a beautiful thing when you find a boat that makes your heart go "zing!"?

But don't let practicality go completely out the window. The yawl model has double the rigging and all that entails, including maintenance costs, sail costs, etc., with very little benefit. Back in the day, yawls were popular for a couple of reasons. First, they split up the sail area, making it easier to handle for small crews. However, since the advent of modern reefing systems like slab and roller reefing (not to mention power winches), this advantage has really diminished. Second, yawls were popular for awhile in the 60's with designers because they "beat the rule", allowing for additional sail area to be added without penalizing the boat. That rule is long gone and whatever artificial advantage it bestowed is also dead. And IMHO, the rig doesn't sail as well. If you are beating to weather, there is no point to hoisting the mizzen; same for running downwind. The sail does nothing. In fact, because the main is smaller on a yawl/ketch, you actually sacrifice drive over the sloop rig. The only time the mizzen helps is when you are broad or beam reaching. And even then, I don't think it's worth having to deal with the extra rigging. To my mind, yawls and ketches just don't make much practical sense except in very special circumstances.

You are right when you speculate that a full keel boat is slower than a modern fin keel design. That's not to say that full keel boats don't have advantages. They track straight like they are on rails. And boats like the Cheoy Lee are very seakindly; their motion in a seaway tends to be more gentle and forgiving than a canoe-shaped modern design. The cons: full keel designs are not as manuverable. If you are used to being able to turn your boat around within a couple of boat lengths, get ready for a change. The same things that keep it tracking straight on course make it more difficult to turn. Just something to get used to. And backing up under power? They don't do it very well. At all. Backing a full keel boat takes a lot of practice, a lot of patience, and a lot of prayer. If you think you will be manuvering a lot in crowded marinas, I suggest that you try out a full keel boat before you buy. I did, and as much as I love the look and feel of the full keel designs, I would never buy one. I boat where the marina space is tight, and I just didn't want to go through that every time I docked. But hey, that's me. There are lots of people who do it on a daily basis and have no problems. Like I said, practice is the name of the game.

And I assume that you are the kind of guy that likes to work on his boat. You can't have a wood doghouse on a boat and not like to do maintenance.

So if this is your dream boat, enjoy! No boat is perfect, but it's the boat that we love that we make work.
 

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Yeah, nobody needs to own any older boat, who doesn't enjoy working on boats, unless they have deep pockets. :)

But, I find that working on my boat gives me almost as much pleasure as sailing it. :)
I've pretty much reached the end of enjoyment of working on my boat LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow! Thanks everyone for the encouraging words. These will require much work compared to others but they look to be very well enjoyed by their owners. I am used to restore projects (seems everything I buy from Kayaks, boats, houses, cars fall into this category anyway, likely a personal issue :D) and actually enjoy them. When I finished our little project this year and tossed it out onto the water for the summer I was actually missing her in the driveway everyday.

Jon, the offset companion way is no issue really for us. We are not "circumnavigators" at this point in the game. Just exploring our neck of the woods could take a lifetime. Will we make crossing of sorts, yes. But it won't be a habit. All I will think about for now is the 3 days across the Gulf. Small steps as it were. Thanks for the links!

Sad story on those decks though. Really sad in fact and I almost hate to say what was done. He painted a deck product (FOR HOUSE DECKS!!!) from Rustoleum all over the teak, caulking and all. :( That boat has had tons of great work done and that one step may make it never sell. I am into projects all right, but peeling all that off, just to get to the decks and begin doing it right would be way beyond fun. Sad.

So Pelagic it is it seems. Now to see if I can make the planets align properly to make this happen.

Guess I need to start an "Inside Passage" thread. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've pretty much reached the end of enjoyment of working on my boat LOL
Too bad. I hope I never reach that moment when it comes to boats. Funny I would rather go fix just about anything on a boat than do just about anything on the house. Thankfully my significant other tends to agree! :D
 

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Cheoy Lee is in Hong Kong NOT Taiwan.

Take a long and hard look at the decks. CL had a weird way of laying up a deck.
Actually, now they are on the mainland. Guess what they had to move their decades old shipyard to accommodate????

Wait for it....

DISNEYLAND!!!! :eek: Oh the humanity. Although my daughters wouldn't object to a visit I bet.

What is "weird" about the deck layup? Are you talking the FG or the teak on top? Thanks Bob for any thoughts. We were actually planning on using your services when the time came one of your beauties could be made to fit the budget. Something tells me a CL boat may not be your favorite though after reading your great blog.
 

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Woe unto you who buys a teak deck! :D

I know about being in love with a boat and those are great beautiful boats. I'd just caution, and as strongly as I can persuasively say, be ready to remove them and lay a glass deck. I mean be really really ready for it. Plan on it as a part of what will need to be done to the boat and don't think you'll be able to re-caulk a 45 year old teak deck and have it not leak. Unless new teak has been laid in the past. More than likely there will be thin boards which won't hold a caulk seam and it will leak again shortly after the back breaking process of re-caulking has just been done.

Read some online articles about the cost and the work necessary for laying a new deck on a 40ft boat. Be prepared for lots of extra work that you'll find when it is pulled up.

Have you thought about the Pearson Countess's? They are are great cruising boat too, same price range and similarly good looking. Just with glass decks.

Cheers and glad you've found a new love!
 

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thats extreme although I understand the fear

I had teack decks on an all teack boat...the decks are where I spent the least of my time on...

sand cross grain...caulk whenever you see a gap open up

in essence they are simple to work on but like anything if you let them go to hell it will bite you in the ass...

now laying a new teak deck is out of the question for most 99 percent of us pricewise...its not even cost effective going to honduras or costa rica and or asia and having it done there...

the point is to find decks that are not beyond repair...
 

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Cheoy Lee is in Hong Kong NOT Taiwan.

Take a long and hard look at the decks. CL had a weird way of laying up a deck.
Are they the ones who screwed them in from below? That way when they wear thin you have pointy screw tips sticking up?

Nice looking boats, the Hong Kong and Taiwan built boats always seem to be like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get, till you pull them apart to fix them. Sometimes amazing quality, other times amazing shortcuts. So a survey is certainly in order.

Using Rustolum Restore on top of teak decks? That is a strange one, and woudl lead me to to wonder about the rest of the maintance on the boat. I love how he says it recommended by the guy at Lowes, (misspelled as Lowels) because we know they are experts at old boat maintenance. Wonder if he had sails made out of blue tarps? And he is already on his third color. I don't know but this does not sound like a good marine material:
It is a porous water soluable concrete type covering that sticks to wood fantastic

Tai-Pan's deck has always been meticulously cared for. Her deck is tight and dry without any water damage evident. Tai-Pan still maintains her original cosmetic teak deck over sandwitched solid wood, surrounded by FG. In 2013, I had to decide whether to remove her entire cosmetic teak deck becasue of all the threat from tthe many brass screws in her or covering, or keep retain the teaks insulation value by covering her deck with a new special deck coating called Restore, sold at Lowels and recommended by their sales person. I applied four coats of Restore in 2013. By the summer of 2014, I was so impressed with it's performance, I added another coat and changed the color to a blue/gray becasue the white was too bright and showed dirt too easy. I am still enamored by this Resttore product as you will be too, once you see how nice a marine deck covering it is. It is a porous water soluable concrete type covering that sticks to wood fantastic and is cooler than teak in the hot sun.
Change in Deck Color: On June 22, 2014, I added the following information: Yesterday I added two more coats of Restore decking compount to lighten the color of the deck from the darker blue/gray to a light cream color, as the blue/gray was a little too dark and dismal for my own liking. I think the light cream color brightens her deck up and blends well with the wood trim. The added two coats of Restore can't hurt either and can only add to it's deck protection. I'll be replacing all deck pictures soon with new deck pictures.
So first 4 coats, then one to change it to blue grey, then two more coats to make it cream? 7 coats of that stuff? Wow, just wow.
 
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