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I'm glad you like it! There are a lot of europeans and australians that come to Brazil by sailboats. It would be nice to see more americans as well.
 

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I'm glad you like it! There are a lot of europeans and australians that come to Brazil by sailboats. It would be nice to see more americans as well.
i would love to sail to Brazil.
jon
 

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There was an incident, discussed in this forum and others, about 4-5 years ago where IIRC a US citizen was having problems with his boat being seized, allegedly illegally, in Brazil and the games our governments were playing. Or not. I know that put a very solid "not in my lifetime" note in many cruiser's books. Not that the US and EU don't have their own corruption problems and ghettos, but Brazil...long coast, big distances, charming attractions but still a formidable undertaking for most cruisers.
 

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There was an incident, discussed in this forum and others, about 4-5 years ago where IIRC a US citizen was having problems with his boat being seized, allegedly illegally, in Brazil and the games our governments were playing. Or not. I know that put a very solid "not in my lifetime" note in many cruiser's books. Not that the US and EU don't have their own corruption problems and ghettos, but Brazil...long coast, big distances, charming attractions but still a formidable undertaking for most cruisers.
Hello, I believe you're talking about the incident with a wooden boat that was left at a boatyard for repairs. The issue was about the bill and the marina wouldn't splash the boat without getting paid. It could also be that the marina acted in bad faith, as I recall the boat owner saying, but I'm sure there are two sides to the story. Perhaps, due to the delays over the bill, the boat passed the official time limit and thus involved the state. Otherwise, Brazil is not complicated to visit. The problem is you are given a fairly short period to stay (6 months), making visiting the long coast a race or inviable, unless you plan on sailing down to Argentina at the end of the stay. Most boats that stop in Brazil arrive in the northeast (Salvador usually) and then head up the Caribbean. It's just too short a time to sail south (to the best cruising grounds like Ilha Grande) and then back up the coast to leave for the Caribbean. Many boats stay longer illegally (not checking in), but it's a risk as you have broken a law that could imply boat seizure.
 

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copa, that sounds like the one. It left a very poor impression, regardless of the facts.

We have a saying in the US: There are always at least THREE sides to every story. His side, her side, and the truth.
 

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.....
We have a saying in the US: There are always at least THREE sides to every story. His side, her side, and the truth.
Yes, quite true.

I thought her sunglasses were kinda Cannes 1970s-ish.
I caught barca/barco enough to know they were talking about their boat.
I enjoy the real-life video stuff.
 

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I am making a webshow about people that live aboard in Brazil.
i have enjoyed watching this very much. It combines two things that i am interested. i have been trying to learn Brazilian Portuguese now for over 10 years. Cassettes and stuff help, but listening to real people talking is the best. i have listened to one episode each day.
thanks again
jon
 
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