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Discussion Starter #1
Welcome to the SailNet Learning to Sail Message Board, a great place to meet beginners if you are new to sailing. Here you can query other sailors by starting a new topic or responding to a current discussion, or search the contents of the Message Boards for items of interest. If you have any questions or suggestions contact us at [email protected]

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Discussion Starter #2
a novice to sailing, I heard that walker bay boats/dinghy are a good place to start. An y views or advice you can offer are greatly appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dinghies are great for learning to sail because they put you close to the water and the boat is very responsive to wind and current, helping you learn quickly how to handle sail and rudder. I bought a used dinghy with sail, oars, outboard, anchor, and life jackets for $500, a lot of extras that will cost extra with most new boats. If money is not a big concern, and you''ve got young kids, there are a number of new plastic rotomold boats out there for beginners, such as the Zuma. The kids can keep sailing it after you''ve bought your big boat! Keep in mind that you''ll need to get something you can cartop or stick in the back of a wagon or pickup. Trailers are very expensive, and few marinas will give up the space to a dinghy. The Sunfish and the Zuma can be cartopped, but most dinghies will need a large van or pickup. On the other hand, a good dinghy towed behind your big boat can extend its useful life by helping you get to shore from an anchorage or mooring.

Cheers,
Bruce
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We are new to sailing but not to the water. We recently purchased an older sailboat, which we are refitting. Our boat has a full keel, and a removable centerboard which was laying in the V-berth. Do we really need to have the centerboard permanently installed? Is it really necessary if we are not going to be racing? What is its real purpose? Is it just for performance? Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It''s hard to say without knowing more about your boat. Talking to the former owner(s) would be best, but it may also be something you can solve by using SailNet''s e-mail lists and archives, which address a very large number of different boats.

If you have a full keel, I can''t imagine why a centerboard would be necessary, unless it is a shallow keel and the centerboard can be lowered in deeper water to provide additional stability and tracking to windward, helping to prevent sliding to leeward.

There is a model of the Catalina, for example, which has a swing keel--a centerboard which can be pulled up to nest inside a shallow keel to make trailering easier.
Good luck,
Bruce
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Happy sails to you, too! The fall season is upon us and it is already delivering many wonderful hours of sailing in cool, breezy weather.

Good luck on your centerboard mystery.

By the way, I stayed in close touch with the former owner of my catboat--which I bought in July of last year--as I discovered new mysteries, and he was always willing to help unravel the answer. Since then, I''ve been in touch with other catboat owners to help solve riddles as they come up. Its a great community. Welcome to the club.

Cheers,
Bruce
 

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We''re new to sailing this summer and tryed to sail in some pretty heavy winds (well to me anyway) this past weekend. We experienced one of those "unexpected jibes". Pretty scary!! My question, how easy does a boat capsize? We sail a 24 ft Neptune with a 5 foot fixed keel. Also any advice on how to hoist and trim the sails in heavier winds would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have been restoring my 24'' Islander for about a year, although the sails are in fine shape how do i find out about what rigging, lines, etc. I need since they are missing. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I recently bought a 24''Clipper Marine and had a great time this summer. I was wondering if there is anyone in the puget sound area that also has one, I thought we could compare notes!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Last spring I became the proud skipper of a 1979CAL 2-25. I have enjoyed this season sailing with mainsail and either a 100 jib or a 135 genoa. With my boat came a spinnaker which I have not used.

On days when we have light winds I would like to try sailing with the spinnacker. I don''t know where to start. I learn best by reading, watching and practicing. Any suggestions for reading material and videos.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I found another good place to start is your local sailing club. Find out if they have local, weekly races and show up. Chances are someone is looking for crew, YES!! even novices. That is exactly how I got my start a couple months ago. I just happen to hook up with a Sailing Assoc. Judge and his 25 footer.

Happy Sailing
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi there,

most keelboats are fairly difficult to capsize unless you end up in some serious waves. Wind alone rarely does it. However, a bad jib in really heavy weather can do damage to your rig, so should be avoided.

One answer to sailing in heavier weather is to reduce sail area early and quickly. First indications of this is too much weather helm, and exessive heeling (what excessive is depends on the particular boat).

If your boat heaves to fairly well, then reefing can be accomplished in that position. If not, well, then a motor with head to wind is probably your best bet. Any other ideas out there?

...Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Totally depends on your boat. A lighter the boat, the less wind needed. Also, if the boat is tender (heels easily), it''ll prefer lighter winds (e.g. less than 15 knots, let''s say).
On the other hand, some heavy boats really don''t start to move until it hits 15 knots. I think 20 to 25 and over is a lot for beginners on nearly all boats.

I hope this helps. ...Chris
 

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If i wanted to design/build sailboats what would i major in? I''m a student at UF trying to figure out what to do and used to go sailing w/ my best friend every weekend when i was younger. i dont know much about it but i know i love it and would like to learn to sail, build the boats..etc..
 

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Discussion Starter #17
LOOKING TO CREW OUT OF CAL.SAN DIEGO. I TOOK LESSONS WITH SAILING SOLUTIONS, THERE IN MISSION BAY. ITS BEEN 8-9 YRS SINCE I''VE SAILED AND REALLY NEED TO GET BACK TO IT.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You don''t have to major in anything to design
and build boats, but if you are in college and want a major in that direction, Marine Architecture would be my first choice and Marine Engineering would be my second. If building is your first love, Industrial Engineering is not a bad second. Good Luck.
 

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I''m new to sailing and I am thinking of buying a 1982 newport 16 to learn with. does anybody have any experience with this boat
they would like to share with me.
Thank You.
Lou
 

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I have a Newport 20 and learned to sail on it. They seem to be well made boats. If you joined the Newport e-mail list on this web site you will probably find some others who have Newport 16''s and could ans your question more directly.
 
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