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Captain, I think it's less about the " Boat" and more about the engine, Prop, Prop-rotation and prop pitch. Wind direction and strength will play a part. Yes, it's a full keel, so a little less responsive, or agile, in tight quarters.

Also, are you in a slip? Bow in? Stern in? Or, are you on a T-dock or end dock, with vessels fore and aft of you?

Generally speaking the use of spring lines can be helpful. Powering against a fore or aft spring can help start you moving in a direction of choice. But a little more info would be helpful.

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My guess from your post is that your boat walks to port in reverse. My boat does too. To minimize the walk, we've found a strong burst of reverse with the rudder hard over to counteract the walk tends to work. As the rudder grabs and the boat speed in reverse increases, you may need to straighten the rudder a bit so you don't go too hard to starboard. Then, with the boat still moving aft, switch to forward and quick push the rudder over to the other peg. This will tend to rotate the boat in place if you do it exactly right. YMMV. Recommend you try this maneuver away from obstructions first, and learn what your particular prop/bottom configuration likes to do. Good luck, full keels and in our cases "skeg" (this spell check is a pain) hung rudders can do some interesting things re: prop walk.
 

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We have a Cape Dory 30, same issue. Slow as you can go, drift as much as you can. Prop determines the direction. Some folks switch back and forth between forward and reverse to keep it straight. But if you have any current that is pretty tuff to do. I found it was easier to go bow first into the slip, drifting in and push out of the slip when leaving the slip.
 

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Barquito
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Have a bailout plan. It is just harder to predict how some boats will behave when backing up. If the bow ends up going in the wrong direction, know ahead of time if you have room to turn, or just continue backing until you get to open water (she is a double ender for a reason). :D
 

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Our Jason 35 goes wherever she pleases in reverse, at least until she has too much way on for close-quarters maneuvering in a marina! The kind and patient people here gave me some reassurance that I wasn’t being a total idiot, and that I just had to use some different techniques to get her where I needed her to be.

Back and fill is your friend. Use short bursts of forward with the rudder to point the rear end/bow where you need it to be, then a burst of reverse to keep her moving astern.

The wind will want to blow the bow down, so observe the wind when preparing to set out, so you can plan for how to counteract it while backing out. We have a boat next to us in our slip and no piling between us, so wind blowing our bow off of the finger requires some extra effort while departing. If my wife is aboard, I’ll have her keep some tension on the bow line to keep our bow closer to the finger for a bit longer as the stern pivots back off of the finger, and I’ll use a bit more speed in reverse so that I have some momentum astern and can afford a burst or two of forward with the rudder hard over to keep her in a good attitude and clear of our neighbor. That said, if the wind is from that direction and is on the strong side, we might elect not to leave right away.

I have plans to practice warping out of the slip on my own, engine in idle reverse for a light assist getting her nearly 10T moving, and walking back to the helm after getting the bow nearly clear of the finger. I need to do this with some space in case I have problems. Once I have the hang of it, this might become my preferred way to leave when the wind is up from any direction.

I know I can spin our boat in place, and I’ve done this several times when things have gone a little sideways leaving the dock, or trying to back in to the lift well for our end-of-season lift out. Learn how to do this if you can. Knowing you can do this reduces panic in close quarters.

Try to always have a few plans running so that you have some options to choose from if something doesn’t go the way you thought it would. Along these lines, don’t be afraid to bail out on a maneuver, but also have a plan of how to do that!
 

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Boats need a spanking and taught what to do!!!!!!!!!!!

I often take my boat out and find a nice isolate mooring ball and go touch my bow to it. From each direction. Then I go touch the stern to it from each direction. Then I find 2 moorings close to each other and go do Figure of 8's through them. Then I do them in reverse.

After doing that a while the boat learns whats expected. And does it!!!!!!!!!!

Remember, boats are stupid so you have to re-do this every few months! :)


Mark
 

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Boats need a spanking and taught what to do!!!!!!!!!!!

I often take my boat out and find a nice isolate mooring ball and go touch my bow to it. From each direction. Then I go touch the stern to it from each direction. Then I find 2 moorings close to each other and go do Figure of 8's through them. Then I do them in reverse.

After doing that a while the boat learns whats expected. And does it!!!!!!!!!!

Remember, boats are stupid so you have to re-do this every few months! :)


Mark
:D
 

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Rhodes 45'
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Easier with timing, then current is to an advantage. The stress of a bad start is no good if it's suppose to be a good time. Lots of people start yelling when they sense that loss of control, take someone who won't take that personal. Prop walk, the spring line, it will all be routine soon. Try not to fret. In time, there's a great satisfaction in getting things dialed in. Any title worth having is worth earning. You have a great attitude in fact you asked. Sailing is a life time in learning. Bring people to help fend off but not those you don't want to see you as weak in seamanship. They won't forget and may not want to go. Be confident by the time you take people who matter. The beginning era should be with the accomplished if you can find them.
Boat Picture frame Watercraft Wood Art
 
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