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I have had a 75 Irwin 33ft sloop now for about a year and a half. There has always been water in the bilge. I can activate the pump and sponge out the remaining water but then I notice water slowly seeping in from around one of the keel bolts (27mm or 7/8 in). I cant get an adjustable wrench on it or I cant find a socket deep enough because the bolt extends through the nut so far the socket wont engage the nut.

My questions are:

1) Could insufficient torque on the keel bolts cause the water to seep in?
2) Could this be a sign of something more serious?
3) Any suggestions on where I can pick up an extra deep socket the size mentioned above to try tightening the bolts to see if it will stop the leak?

Thanks!
 

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hey there TerryJoe. Insufficient torque on the keel bolt could result in the leakage. I would look for a deepwell socket in the size you need at an auto parts place or at Harbor Freight if there's one nearby. I would get on this fairly quickly since the leak won't get better by itself. If the leak continues after you have tightened up the bolt I think you'd have to haul to seal around the keel stub .

Good luck,
Ike
 

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Yes,
Yes,

and what might be better is using a crow's foot socket wrench... doesn't care how much bolt sticks out.. :)




However, I'd highly recommend dropping the keel, scraping off the old sealant, inspecting the keel bolts and then if everything checks out, rebedding the keel and tightening the keelbolts to spec.
 

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Easy extended depth socket, take the correct sized 6 point socket and cut it just below the drive side, then take a length of DOM tubing that fits over the socket and have it welded together at the length you need.

'Homebuilt' sockets like that are generally much better than manufactured sockets as most of them are just pressed and deform very easily, using a heavy wall tube means there is no loss when torqueing them.
Don't cut the bolts for access, as the length is normally needed when you need to drop/install the keel.

Have several like that in my toolbox, the old ford fm145 transmissions were notorious for having a nut work loose that was on the wrong side of an 11 inch shaft.

Crowfoot wrenches are great, but have the same drawbacks as any open end wrench, they only drive on two sides and can easily round the nuts.


Ken.
 

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Just another note on sockets.

If you grind of the tapered start section of a 6 point socket so that you get full contact you can get most any nut of bolt out even ones allready rounded.

Why do they make 12 point sockets any way???
 
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