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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm new to the forum (will be intro'ing myself in next thread) and I am looking at a Cal 27' T2. I saw the boat this past weekend and really liked it. I am having an inspector come out to the boat with me tomorrow to thoroughly check it over. One thing I did notice was a moldy spot and dampness on the very bottom of the bulkhead. There was also a damp spot in another area, but I did not take pictures so I can't really describe it.

I'm new to sailboats so I'm looking for advice on what potential issues or trouble spots I should be aware of. Is a leak in this area typical of most older boats or typical of a particulare issue? I will be doing all of the refurb myself if I get this.

Also, I'm not exactly sure it is a T2. The ad says it, but I am having trouble finding much in the way of information on this boat.

If anyone has any advice please let me know.

Regards,

Chris
 

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Broad Reachin'
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Chris,

Welcome to the forums. I'm sure you'll find a lot of help here.

Wet bulkheads can often mean leaky chainplates, since many boats use bulkheads as anchoring points for the chainplates. Chainplates (and most deck hardware) are prone to leaking on almost any older boat and should be inspected carefully. Of course, the wet bulkhead could also be the result of any number of other issues such as leaking portlights, leaking hatches, bilge water, etc. Do not more forward with the purchase until you've identified the culprit!
 

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Retired and happy
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If your inspector does his job properly, he will give you a clear indication of whether or not this is a serious problem.

Older boats (and even some newer ones!) can often leak eg from the port windows or from deck fittings or hull/deck seam. However, water which has apparently been collecting over a long period of time indicates that the owner has either not noticed it or not attended to it. Then you have to ask - what else might have been neglected?

Good luck with the inspection.

Stuart
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The wood around the chainplates looked fine. As you look down to where this piece of wood ends (right where it meets the seating surface in the galley) it begins to show white traces of mildew and then dampness and black mold. The wood here is damp and it has stayed wet since the cushion was also damp and turning colors from the mold.

The current owner is in the middle of a mild rennovation and he may not know exactly what he is doing since the port windows were kept open, I'm guessing to ventilate. There is a cover over the "doghouse", but it isn't waterproof. The cover doesn't look as old as the mold so I'm guessing the open windows aren't the actual problem or issue I'm looking for.

Chris
 

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By inspector, I hope you mean a certified marine surveyor with fiberglass sailboat expertise.

If the bottom of the bulkhead is wet, chances are pretty good that the bottom of the bulkhead is rotted out or on its way there... and if the water came from the chainplates—a lot of the bulkhead may be shot.
 

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Hi Speed

Your inspector / surveyor (I hope) should be able to identify the severity and cause of the problem. Is it surface mold or is the wooden bulkhead rotted at the bottom? If it is rotted at the bottom, some standing water may have wicked up the open grain of the bulkhead. This happens with lots of open grain hardwood and many plywoods. If it is rotted, the fix is a job that can be done at a modest cost and should provide basis for a reduction in price if you are amenable to the boat and the repair process.

Lot's of people here are very helpful in all matters of repairs so if you want to post some photos, I'm sure you will get some good advice.

Good luck!

121 Guy
 

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It is obviously hard to judge without actually being able to inspect the problem, but from your description, it sounds as though the dampness is on the opposite side of the bulkhead. Is that open to inspection or does it butt up against another surface? It could be dripping from the doghouse, or running down from a leak in the deck, or even coming from the galley area?

Stuart
 

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Here's a link to another T2 for sale for reference.. it should confirm (or not) that this is a T2. btw, T2s are great PHRF sleepers and do very well when well sailed.

1974 Cal 27 T2, Kentucky Lake, Kentucky, $6,950

Good luck... second all the comments about a good surveyor, keep your eyes open.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
EDIT: fourth pic down in that link-the left side of the bulkhead where it meets the seating/cushion is where the wood is wet and moldy in mine. I believe there is a port above the bulkhead in this area.

I think it is open to inspection. I will look very thoroughly tomorrow and will take a camera and a flashlight. I really like this boat, but I'm in no position to take on a complete restoration.

The inspector knows I'm a DIY'er so his advice and opinions should be somewhat honest. I won't pay anyone for anything I can't do myself.

Thanks for the advice.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey Guys,

Just to update you-I passed on this boat. The inspector was worth the money and I eventually just walked away based on the time needed to bring this thing up to a condition that is decent enough to bring my family on. The motor was great, probably worth more than the boat two times over. The boat also came with 6 sales, also probably worth several times the boats value, but the deck was completely rotted and the fiberglass was seperated from where it meets the port hole in the deck. There was rot in the bulkhead, not where I thought, but on the other side near the bottom. It could be fixed, but would require labor on my part and a lot of time.

I liked the boat and did consider the purchase since it had a great motor and tons of sails, but bottom line is I just don't have the time now to spend fixing it and time isn't growing on trees-another baby on the way.

Right now I'm looking at a couple of Catalina 27's that look very well kept. I will be taking an inspector with me on those as well.

Thanks for the advice,

Chris
 

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Probably a good decision... plenty of boats our there, no need to take on unnecessary work/grief.

btw - just so we're all talking the same language, we call them "marine surveyors" as opposed to "inspectors".;)
 

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Chris-

I'd highly recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Thread and use what's been written there to decide whether to spring for a surveyor on the next couple of boats... It'll save you some money, by helping eliminate the lemons.

Hey Guys,

Just to update you-I passed on this boat. The inspector was worth the money and I eventually just walked away based on the time needed to bring this thing up to a condition that is decent enough to bring my family on. The motor was great, probably worth more than the boat two times over. The boat also came with 6 sales, also probably worth several times the boats value, but the deck was completely rotted and the fiberglass was seperated from where it meets the port hole in the deck. There was rot in the bulkhead, not where I thought, but on the other side near the bottom. It could be fixed, but would require labor on my part and a lot of time.

I liked the boat and did consider the purchase since it had a great motor and tons of sails, but bottom line is I just don't have the time now to spend fixing it and time isn't growing on trees-another baby on the way.

Right now I'm looking at a couple of Catalina 27's that look very well kept. I will be taking an inspector with me on those as well.

Thanks for the advice,

Chris
 
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