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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Maybe this is a dumb question, but here goes anyway. I have never used what Bill Crealock deems as the 'wet locker' on my PSC 34. However, I was looking at it the other day and clearing it out so that I could actually make use of it for its intended purpose and I noticed something that appeared odd. I can't find any drain holes to the bilge. It looks as though it is completely sealed and there is no way for water to drain to the bilge. Any other PSC 34 owners with the same situation? Do you think that a PO glassed over them?

This photo is the outside of the locker, just below the chart table.
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This is the bottom of the locker on the inboard side where I would expect to find drain holes into the bilge, but none in sight.

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I'll have to check if there is a limber hole in mine, but I don't think so. I've never used it as a wet locker. It's where I store a tool box as well as a bunch of pots and pans.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll have to check if there is a limber hole in mine, but I don't think so. I've never used it as a wet locker. It's where I store a tool box as well as a bunch of pots and pans.
Thanks. It is such convenient storage for frequently accessed items. I almost hate to change it over to a wet locker. I may end up switching back, but it still would be good to have limber holes.
 

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For us, the locker under the nav desk is for type II PFDs to suit the USCG, inflatable PFDs with harnesses and tethers for us, and a 5 lb bottle of CO2 to carbonate the Diet Coke and homebrew. Wet foul weather gear hangs in the head after dripping its way through the boat. Dry foul weather gear hangs in the side of the hanging locker that is still a hanging locker. I put shelves in the other side. On my boat the nav desk locker does drain to the bilge, but that is through a hole that I imagine a PO drilled. They are the route that some of the instrument cables take between the nav desk and the bilge.

Bill Murdoch
1988 PSC 34
Irish Eyes
 

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1992 Pacific Seacraft 34
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Hi,

I have old manuals, sales brochures, etc. and none of them show that as a wet locker. Like yours, mine does not have ventilation or drainage that would be needed. In my mind there is nothing about that space that makes for a good wet locker. But that's just me. I have a shelf dividing it the middle and it holds a lot of stuff. It's my favorite storage compartment. The head is what I use as a wet locker.

Best of luck!
 

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We left absorbing pads on the bottom and hung a bag of absorbing crystals. Still didn’t work out so hung wet stuff in the head. This was on a psc 34. If I went back to a psc and was using it for long term cruising would want a 40 or 44. Have come to think the 37 and 34 are too small.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi,

I have old manuals, sales brochures, etc. and none of them show that as a wet locker. Like yours, mine does not have ventilation or drainage that would be needed. In my mind there is nothing about that space that makes for a good wet locker. But that's just me. I have a shelf dividing it the middle and it holds a lot of stuff. It's my favorite storage compartment. The head is what I use as a wet locker.

Best of luck!
I really like your idea of adding a shelf. It still would not preclude one from using it as a wet locker by just removing a shelf that is mounted on a couple of cleats. Great idea. I'm sure that the space is much more usable. Given that no one seems to use it as a wet locker, I'm tempted to add a shelf.

I have a brochure (not sure of the vintage) that does state that it is intended as a wet locker, but it seems to be one of the few mistakes that WIB Crealock made in the design of the PSC 34.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We left absorbing pads on the bottom and hung a bag of absorbing crystals. Still didn’t work out so hung wet stuff in the head. This was on a psc 34. If I went back to a psc and was using it for long term cruising would want a 40 or 44. Have come to think the 37 and 34 are too small.
That's what my wife says too. I may need a bigger boat to keep the Admiral happy. I like how 'handy' the 34 is in terms of being able to still manage all the gear (even at the ripe young age of 64), I can carry the boom, and the sails, move the mast around (not easily though), without help. However, any longterm stays may get tight. I did a 2 week trip with a friend last summer and it was fine, although we were in marinas each night, so that doesn't really count. I have to agree with you though, that 40 is awfully tempting.
 

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We have a shelf in that wet locker also, turns it into prime storage space. I don't know if the shelf is original, but it is definitely a permanent installation.

Talking about the PSC 40 or 44, I was looking at a couple for sale on yachtworld over breakfast this morning. It sure would be nice to have more space, but I cannot image the additional maintenance. I can hardly keep up with the 34.
 

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We left absorbing pads on the bottom and hung a bag of absorbing crystals. Still didn’t work out so hung wet stuff in the head. This was on a psc 34. If I went back to a psc and was using it for long term cruising would want a 40 or 44. Have come to think the 37 and 34 are too small.
I know this is off-topic but I recently came to the same conclusion about the 34 and 37 being too small (inside). I was recently watching some YouTube videos about Hans Christian 33s... I can't believe how much room there is in that boat (but obviously it comes at a cost - very heavy displacement).
 

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A few years ago, I spent three weeks on an island packet 37. Even though that boat was only 3 feet longer than mine, the difference in space was phenomenal.
 
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