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Discussion Starter #1
I just came back from my marina. Its cold with freezing rain and I wanted to check on the boat. I walked along some of the other docks and saw a few things that really make me angry.
I worked hard to get the boat I currently have. It's not much but I have loved every minute of owning it. I wash it more than my car and if I could I'd be down there everyday doing something if not on the lake.
I saw a few boats today that obviously haven't been out in years. There is a Bene that is an inch thick with dirt, spider webs - you name it. I saw another 30 foot where the cockpit was so filled with water it was spilling over into the cabin. I know that boat hasn't seen its owner in 4 years.
There is a Seidleman 29.9. The cockpit and cabin are filled with empty beer cans. The boom is hanging off the mast and the sail is ripped.
Its a shame that owners let these boats go.
Is this normal? Or a sign of the times?
 

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It's normal.

and sad.
 

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I have the sailing bug, but no boat, yet. I've walked along the docks of the harbor marina where I live. We only moved here in July. There were so many boats in 'disrepair' that I emailed the harbor master asking if she knew of any for sale. She responded in the positive. I look forward to seeing what may be out there for sale, and to freeing up a slip for someone as there is a two year waiting list.

Seems like the marina could create some good business opportunities by contacting owners of neglected boats offering to assist in selling what they obviously don't care about.
 

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1977 Morgan OI 30
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That is confusing

Thats sad and such a waste. I do think its a sign of the times and the wrong focus of whats important. If someone works hard for what they get, then that likely won't happen. Of course the sign of the times all point to the convolution that causes people to lose jobs, have health problems, family turmoil or a multitude of other :puke
I'm happy to report its not the norm in marinas around here in Mass. though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
StNick, I've talked to our marina manager as well. I actually have my eye on one of the abandoned ones. It hasn't moved in 4 years. The owners are 2 years behind on slip fees and they are set to auction it in Feb.
As long as the slip fees are being paid, management really doesn't know about them. He told me to find the hull number and do a title check. You can usually get a name and address to at least make them an offer.
Some marinas let you pay monthly where some charge the full year. I'm sure some people have big sailing dreams then get bored after a few months.
I've got a close friend who discussed boating with his current wife. They went out and bought a $90,000 Bayliner. They went together 3 times. She's now bored and won't go out anymore. He now pays $520 a month for a place to drink a beer. Sad but true. He'd sell the boat to the first person who made him a decent offer.
 

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Not anything new. perhaps a bit more prevelent today.
Back in 93 I remember the 'spider boat'. launced in spring and never visited all summer. The spiders built a house of horrors there. I could not imagine the owner finally coming to move the boat out for winter and having to hack through the webs & spiders big enough to carry off a small dog.

Once the boat looses it's luster, it's easy to keep slipping down that slope and eventually not want to come back and be reminded of your poor maintenance. In the south you don't have to move the boat in the fall so it can sit for years.
 

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This was also very common at the marina where I Kept my boat. I would say 50% of the boats never went out or had anyone come check on them over that 5 year period. There was one 30' sailboat that had to be pumped out three times because water had filled the boat to the point the waterline was 6 inches below the water. And according to the marina they all paid the slip fees regularly. Go figure.
 

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We are buying a boat (survey this weekend) in Seattle. We go round and round where to keep it.... Shilshole or Elliott Bay. Shilshole is cheaper, but oh my god, the number of boats that just languish there, it is so depressing. Elliott Bay seems to draw a little higher end crowd and much fewer ignored boats. To me there is not much sadder a thing, than an ignored toy, if it no longer interests you, make it available to someone who will cherish it and use it!

michael
 

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Personally, I think it has do to with the marina that the boats are at. Some marina's are as mentioned, seem to get higher class/responsible owners if you will. meanwhile others, have lower end boats, that sit and sit. Where I am at, granted there are a few boats that languish, most, seem to go out at some point in time. But I will admit, there are four near me, one I have never seen the owner in the 3 yrs I have been there, one some one pressure washing, did half, have not seen in 1.5 yrs. Another, mast's came off a yr or so ago, met the owner one time............a fourth, an overall real pretty yankee 30 is now for sale, higher than it should be, but not bad.

Anyway, think this goes on to a degree in ANY marina, but some, seem to get and attract more relects than others.

Marty
 

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Another shame are boats that are kept up, but never taken out.

My wife and I used to wonder why people would buy a boat, pay everything that it took to slip and maintain it, then never use it...seemed like such a waste to us.

I know know one reason why some boats never leave the slip. In my case my wife indicated she wanted a sailboat almost as much as I did, so we bought one and took it out once a week. My wife had never been on the ocean before (only power boats on calm waters), and she had grandiose ideas of what sailing would be like probably from watching to many Errol Flynn movies. She hated getting the boat in and out of the slip (she was always afraid that we were going to crash or something which we never did), disliked the heeling when getting some good wind, didn't like ocean swells, didn't like wakes from large power boats, and didn't really trust me even though I have sailed many thousands of miles. So now we have a nice sailboat that we haven't taken out in almost three months (takes two to get in and out of our double slip), and who knows how long it will be before I can get out on the boat again. Now I have to rely on other people that have some experience, that would like to go sailing with us (wife feels better if there's three on board). The best I can do at the moment is go down to the boat once in awhile and spend the night...always alone. I think a new partner is just about in order now.
 

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Another shame are boats that are kept up, but never taken out.

My wife and I used to wonder why people would buy a boat, pay everything that it took to slip and maintain it, then never use it...seemed like such a waste to us.

I know know one reason why some boats never leave the slip. In my case my wife indicated she wanted a sailboat almost as much as I did, so we bought one and took it out once a week. My wife had never been on the ocean before (only power boats on calm waters), and she had grandiose ideas of what sailing would be like probably from watching to many Errol Flynn movies. She hated getting the boat in and out of the slip (she was always afraid that we were going to crash or something which we never did), disliked the heeling when getting some good wind, didn't like ocean swells, didn't like wakes from large power boats, and didn't really trust me even though I have sailed many thousands of miles. So now we have a nice sailboat that we haven't taken out in almost three months (takes two to get in and out of our double slip), and who knows how long it will be before I can get out on the boat again. Now I have to rely on other people that have some experience, that would like to go sailing with us (wife feels better if there's three on board). The best I can do at the moment is go down to the boat once in awhile and spend the night...always alone. I think a new partner is just about in order now.

Jiffy, Sorry to hear of your situation regarding sailing and your wife. I wonder if she, or both of you together took some sailing classes( even if you don't need em) if that wouldn't give her some confidence and comfort in sailing. A basic Keelboat or Basic Cruising class from US Sail or ASA could be had for under a grand and might do the trick.

Hope it turns out okay for you two.

michael
 

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I hope this isn't Hijacking the thread (if it is then just kick it out), but since I'm in the market for a cheap fixerupper and have limited time to visit every marina on the east coast...........

how about listing the name and city these marinas where the neglected cheapies are so I can go straight to them.

Last time I was in Fl. I pulled over and asked a guy where a sailboat marina was and you would have thought I asked where his little sister was.......

anyway.....thanks in advance.........unless I get the boot......
 

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What the heck happened last night Buckeye?
I thought the Big Ten might have had a chance.
 

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Jiffy, Sorry to hear of your situation regarding sailing and your wife. I wonder if she, or both of you together took some sailing classes( even if you don't need em) if that wouldn't give her some confidence and comfort in sailing. A basic Keelboat or Basic Cruising class from US Sail or ASA could be had for under a grand and might do the trick.

Hope it turns out okay for you two.

michael
Excellent advise.
Don't give up the ship Jiffy........ I hope this works out for you.
 

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cap'n chronic
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Another shame are boats that are kept up, but never taken out.

My wife and I used to wonder why people would buy a boat, pay everything that it took to slip and maintain it, then never use it...seemed like such a waste to us.

I know know one reason why some boats never leave the slip. In my case my wife indicated she wanted a sailboat almost as much as I did, so we bought one and took it out once a week. My wife had never been on the ocean before (only power boats on calm waters), and she had grandiose ideas of what sailing would be like probably from watching to many Errol Flynn movies. She hated getting the boat in and out of the slip (she was always afraid that we were going to crash or something which we never did), disliked the heeling when getting some good wind, didn't like ocean swells, didn't like wakes from large power boats, and didn't really trust me even though I have sailed many thousands of miles. So now we have a nice sailboat that we haven't taken out in almost three months (takes two to get in and out of our double slip), and who knows how long it will be before I can get out on the boat again. Now I have to rely on other people that have some experience, that would like to go sailing with us (wife feels better if there's three on board). The best I can do at the moment is go down to the boat once in awhile and spend the night...always alone. I think a new partner is just about in order now.
this is why men cheat on their wives.or at least start ignoring them.
 

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Caribbean Surveyor
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When I first got to my marina 5 years ago, I was walked around by a fellow sailor and told that "this person never goes out" and "this person never cleans his boat" and I thought it was terrible and a shame.

Now, I think too bad for them and it's none of my business. If somebody wants to have a sailboat as a floating cottage and never leave the dock, it's their choice. I can't stand being at the dock, but that is me. My sailboat is always clean and that is my choice. I really wish people would stop worrying about why other people do things and realize that we are all individuals with different ideas and tastes.

Unless it becomes a safety issue, let it be and go sailing.
 

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I think it also has to do with the price of the slip. If its expensive enough, people are driven to get rid of the boat or find a cheaper slip if they don't use it at all. In our area you have to take the boat out of the water in winter at most marinas, which produces a large bill and a pretty big incentive.
 

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Another shame are boats that are kept up, but never taken out.

My wife and I used to wonder why people would buy a boat, pay everything that it took to slip and maintain it, then never use it...seemed like such a waste to us.

I know know one reason why some boats never leave the slip. In my case my wife indicated she wanted a sailboat almost as much as I did, so we bought one and took it out once a week. My wife had never been on the ocean before (only power boats on calm waters), and she had grandiose ideas of what sailing would be like probably from watching to many Errol Flynn movies. She hated getting the boat in and out of the slip (she was always afraid that we were going to crash or something which we never did), disliked the heeling when getting some good wind, didn't like ocean swells, didn't like wakes from large power boats, and didn't really trust me even though I have sailed many thousands of miles. So now we have a nice sailboat that we haven't taken out in almost three months (takes two to get in and out of our double slip), and who knows how long it will be before I can get out on the boat again. Now I have to rely on other people that have some experience, that would like to go sailing with us (wife feels better if there's three on board). The best I can do at the moment is go down to the boat once in awhile and spend the night...always alone. I think a new partner is just about in order now.
Jiffy, Sorry to hear of your situation regarding sailing and your wife. I wonder if she, or both of you together took some sailing classes( even if you don't need em) if that wouldn't give her some confidence and comfort in sailing. A basic Keelboat or Basic Cruising class from US Sail or ASA could be had for under a grand and might do the trick.

Hope it turns out okay for you two.

michael
I'll third this classes advice. It does not matter how many thousands of sailing miles you have, as far as your wife is concerned you have none. It is not like university or some other institution where you get transfer credits for previous experience. You get no transfer credits from a wife, you only have knowledge of that which she witnessed you aquired, previous to that, you were just born and knew nothing. I was able to gain my wifes confidence by getting 95% on my Power Squadron exam which she attended with me. She also sees me practice safety and sees me taking an interest in furthering boating skills. As long as your wife has the confidence in you to trust you to her safety you are ahead of the game. My wife loves sailing as I do and as long as she is at the helm or controlling the sails and has some form of control over the situation she will take the boat over to 25 degrees of heel and charge over those waves.:D
 
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