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Advanced beginner
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 30 year old boat. Everyone I know has a 20-40 year old boat. I feel like I have a decent handle on the relative qualities of many 80's-era production boats (I don't claim to be an expert). But I know very little about modern boat builders. I'd like to be a little less ignorant.

I won't ask you what you don't like, as I'm not interested in bashing other people's boats. But what modern boats do you like? Who do you think is building good boats right now? What would you buy if you could?
 

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I got to recently take a look at an HH50 catamaran. This is about the nicest, well-thought out cruising catamaran being made right now. It is also very expensive. Dialing price back the Balance 526 is my next favorite. The Balance 482 looks like it will be a similarly good smaller sister to the 526 at a lower price. In the same price ballpark as the Balance 526 is the Seawind 1600, which I like a lot. The new Outremers are good boats, but they don't appeal to me as much as these others. There are several bespoke catamaran designs made in small numbers that are nice.

Otherwise, the newest offerings of production catamarans are truly horrible in almost every way. If I couldn't afford the above, I'd get a used boat of a better design and performance.

If I had to get a monohull, I like the Pogo cruising boats like the 36, 44, and 50.

If cruising was defined as coastal or weekending/vacationing, there are other boats I like for that.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I intended cruising to include boats for off-shore passages as well as boats for coastal cruising exclusively. I was just not as interested in modern racing designs.
 

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I understood that. I meant my statement to say if cruising was defined as ONLY coastal or weekend/vacation, then other boats would fall into my preferences.

Mark
 

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I have liked the Pogo's for quite some time as well. The new Bene Oceanis 30 is a sweet little boat too. If I had the $$ I would go that route. Tiller, 2 cabin layout, one out in CA for about $170K. Been fond of the X Yachts as well.
 

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Sorry, I can't contribute, but there are not any.
 

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Hi,

I'll bite!

For me personally, I want a boat that sails very well - fast, comfortable, able to get around the race course in all conditions. It also must be comfortable. Have a good interior, a functional galley, a head with shower. Something in the 38-42 that can be sailed with a crew of 4-6 or cruised comfortably by two for a month or two. This means a traditional main, a sloop rig, a deep keel.

Boat I like a lot are make by X Yachts (the XP38 or XC38 series), Elan E5, Dehler 42 or 38 and Salona 41 or 38.

If I had the money I would buy the XC38 (but I don't); I am seriously considering the Salona 38. Salona is little know in the USA. Their hulls are vacuum epoxy laminate, steel structural grid to handle rig loads, watertight collision bulkheads bow and stern, lead bulb on an iron / lead keel.

In the US I also like Tartan boats. Real nice, REAL expensive.

Barry
 

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bell ringer
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Unless one works for a sailing magazine reviewing sailboats how could you possibly answer the question?
 

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Unless one works for a sailing magazine reviewing sailboats how could you possibly answer the question?
Precisely... I no longer go to boat shows.... and when I did I didn't look at any new boats. I do see boats in the anchorage and at docks. I don't go below and don't study the deck layout, rig and what I can see from a distance. I don't "walk the docks" as I am not interested in a new boat. I am interested in enjoying and caring for mine!
I do see the trends... wide sterns, dual steering stations, less wood and sleeker profiles. I liked a few boats I saw in the anchorage.... but have forgotten the maker / model if I even knew it.

I would rather this question be multiple choice. ;-)
 

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Hi,

I'll bite!

For me personally, I want a boat that sails very well - fast, comfortable, able to get around the race course in all conditions. It also must be comfortable. Have a good interior, a functional galley, a head with shower. Something in the 38-42 that can be sailed with a crew of 4-6 or cruised comfortably by two for a month or two. This means a traditional main, a sloop rig, a deep keel.

Boat I like a lot are make by X Yachts (the XP38 or XC38 series), Elan E5, Dehler 42 or 38 and Salona 41 or 38.

If I had the money I would buy the XC38 (but I don't); I am seriously considering the Salona 38. Salona is little know in the USA. Their hulls are vacuum epoxy laminate, steel structural grid to handle rig loads, watertight collision bulkheads bow and stern, lead bulb on an iron / lead keel.

In the US I also like Tartan boats. Real nice, REAL expensive.

Barry
You have similar tastes to me it seems! Unfortunately the ones that really catch my eye are way out of our price range.

If I was looking at a serious offshore cruiser the new Halbert Rasseys look pretty nice!

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

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My impression was the thread was about modern boats, which I took to mean currently available. Are Shannon and Pacific Seacraft still making new sailboats?

Mark
Pacific Seacraft are or were last year, Shannon my have stopped in the last few years. I would still consider them modern even though I think they still look like a proper sailing vessel.....that I can't afford if I want to retire soon. Dennis
 

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I'm never all that good at these queries, as I think every boat is a compromise and depends on what one wants to do with it. I'm also not a detailed student of all boats out there. I do enjoy seeing innovation on new boats, at the shows, whether I'm in the market or not.

Reading the opening post, one might think they are asking for boats <20 years old. However, many, including ours, are no longer made, despite that window. The manufacturer has new versions.

Ours was the most popular sailboat ever built, over 50 ft, during it's production run from 2004-2008. I still think it represents one of the best values in its range. I think better suited for coastal cruising, particularly given it's fuel capacity, but many of it's breed have commonly crossed oceans and made the New England - Caribbean snowbird transit multiple times. Many were used for charter, which probably put some serious wear and tear on the comps, but many in the US were not.

So, what is modern?
 

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No offense to the OP... this is somewhat of a stupid and confusing thread.

Why does it matter what a SN member likes as far as the vague notion of a "modern boat"?

Each sailor will be in a particular location, race, or cruise or whatever... have different personal experiences... boats they have sailed on enough to comment, budget and so on.

When I write about topics such as this.... I write about my boat, its features... one I have owned for 35 yrs....I don't write about other boats nor am I interested.

Some people have a bit of experience with different boats... or perhaps are designers or brokers... etc. They have a different type of contribution.

A general marker might be number of hulls built and still in use... that is if demand means anything.
 

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But what modern boats do you like? Who do you think is building good boats right now? What would you buy if you could?
I thought this was a fun and light-hearted topic. I like it. Sailnet here mostly focuses on old designs and old boats - many of whose designers and manufacturers are long gone. Few here seldom discuss what boat they would have if there were no unreasonable hindrance to obtaining it (I'm thinking that not having an extra $100k is reasonable, but not having an extra $1billion is not).

One doesn't need to minutely examine each boat nor work for a magazine dedicated to evaluating them in order to see modern trends that they appreciate (or not). For example, I personally like the simpler, lighter, airier Ikea-like interiors on many modern designs (be aware that I've never seen an Ikea store so don't know what it is really like, and use that term only because others apply it to these interiors). Additionally, I've sailed enough different cruising boat hull designs in both monohulls and catamarans to understand which features relate to certain performance and comfort aspects.

It seems like some think they are expected to provide the correct answer, or even a complete answer, when there isn't any such thing. Nobody has to be interested in changing their existing boat to discuss other boats or design features they find interesting.

Just for perspective, most here applaud JeffH when he outlines differences between old and new designs, so I don't understand the negativity when simply asked directly what one likes of the new designs.

Mark
 

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So, what is modern?
I would say that yours is "modernish" and the direct precursor through only slight evolution to a "modern" boat. It is a complete revolution away from the older designs. Ours is the same.

Manufacturers drop models for new ones every couple of years, but they do not change the underlying designs much. Those type of changes only occur in longer periods.

Right now is one of those revolution periods where major design elements, materials, and construction techniques from more extreme boats are making their way into cruising boats for good reasons.

I suspect if this topic is revisited in 5-10yrs, both of our boats will be considered old designs then.

Mark
 
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