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No offense to the OP... this is somewhat of a stupid and confusing thread.

Why does it matter what a SN member likes as far as the vague notion of a "modern boat"?

Each sailor will be in a particular location, race, or cruise or whatever... have different personal experiences... boats they have sailed on enough to comment, budget and so on.

When I write about topics such as this.... I write about my boat, its features... one I have owned for 35 yrs....I don't write about other boats nor am I interested.

Some people have a bit of experience with different boats... or perhaps are designers or brokers... etc. They have a different type of contribution.

A general marker might be number of hulls built and still in use... that is if demand means anything.
Wow. This from the guy complaining about loud motorcycles and pickups, on a sailing forum. I thought it was a great idea for a thread. Have you never dreamt of a shiny new ( insert item of interest here)??

I don't get a chance to see any new sail boats where I live. River rafts and drift boats, sure. My dreaming about a new boat is limited to the interwebs. So let the thread go where it will, and how about posting some links or pictures to go with?!

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
 

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I suspect the old look of dark wood interiors is not going to be seen much again. Light woods and wood trim may be the look of today's boat interiors. This can be very successfully done.
Monos are moving toward wide sterns and dual helm stations.. and it seems more fractional rigs... more flush decks with ports in the hull as opposed to a raised coach roof.
Things like "solar arches" may be OEM design features.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Yes - this was intended to be a light-hearted topic!

I'm trying to distract myself <gestures at everything> by dreaming about my retirement boat and where I will sail her. But retirement is 10-15 years away, and it occurs to me I know almost nothing about the boats being built today. So I just thought I'd see what other sailors thought about the current generation of boat builders, and see if there were any builders I'm currently unfamiliar with that I should keep my eye on.

I'm already learning things - I'd never even heard of Pogo before.
 

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I also like hearing other opinions and reference this a a general opinion question. I vote to keep hearing the responses. If modern is newer than 1985 than my pick was/is a 1987 Sabre 42. To me they are beautiful boats, seaworthy, and have good sailing attributes-even for the race course.

Foster.
 

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Deck Salons, A catamaran like cabin with good side decks, A friend and I sailed miles out of our way just to follow a Moody 45 and watch it under sail. I think Capta might even see some advantages to the design in his business.
And for little known dreamboats, my wife wants me to sell EVERYTHING and get her a Sirius.
Sirius 35 DS
 

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Discussion Starter #26
That Moody definitely has dream-worthy 'I want the light and spacious deck of a catamaran but in a monohull' boat vibes.
 

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OK. I guess I don't understand how "modern" and "currently available" are different, nor do I see how 20yr+ old designs are considered "modern".

Mark
I though this was fun also, better than hot topics like full keel vs fin. So back to it. So you kind of say two things. The Pacific Seacraft is still available new but you would consider it not modern because it is still pointy, low in the water and has no sugar scoop.

So would a Southerly, still available be considered modern? Would it be considered modern if compared to the new cup boats?

Here is Webster for modern. "of, relating to, or characteristic of the present or the immediate past"

Same for Immediate "occurring, acting, or accomplished without loss or interval of time"

So both the Southerly and Pacific Seacraft are still made, so one can not say it is not modern. Both are in the present. Modern electronics, modern sails and modern finish.

But your definition is, I think..... Modern: cutting edge, futuristic, non conventional design, innovative. I have no Idea what that boat would even be for me to want one. LOL
 

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I'm quite happy to read a spirited debate on what distinguishes a modern cruising boat from a traditional cruising boat - anything to distract from the latest from CDC - but I think all I intended by 'modern' boat builders was 'building boats in this century'. No reason to stick even to that!
 

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I'm quite happy to read a spirited debate on what distinguishes a modern cruising boat from a traditional cruising boat - anything to distract from the latest from CDC - but I think all I intended by 'modern' boat builders was 'building boats in this century'. No reason to stick even to that!
Damn, you mean boats built since 2000? Well, that leaves me, and most people here, out. As the recent survey thread shows, the vast, vast majority of boats here are more than 30 years old, with nearly 1/2 being 40+ years. Only about 20% of respondents say they own boats built in this century.

BTW, I'm not taking this to be a serious or heavy discussion 😀.
 

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Hello,

I like this topic. It's a great way to learn from fellow sailors and not from a magazine review where every boat is the 'best ever'. It's also winter, my boat is stored, I can't sail, so this keeps me focusing on sailing and sail boats.

If you want to read about 'interesting boats' there is a great blog here

The owner, Paulo, used to be a frequent contributor here. I don't know why he stopped.

Barry
 

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But your definition is, I think..... Modern: cutting edge, futuristic, non conventional design, innovative. I have no Idea what that boat would even be for me to want one. LOL
The Pacific Seacraft 37 was designed in 1978, and a design that I don't consider modern anymore. All of their other models are last century design too that stick very close to the 1978 ones. I wonder how many of them they have made since 2015? I would place PS as a bespoke manufacturer of essentially one-offs now.

I don't define modern cruising boats as cutting edge, futuristic, or non-conventional. Innovative, yes - but all new boats should have some innovation or we would still be in dugout canoes. I recognize the other attributes in racing and extreme boats, but don't define modern cruising boats as needing such. I do define modern cruising boats as having design features that take advantage of more current mass-produced materials and common engineering. For example, we needed new sails, and I was pleased to find out that weren't limited to canvas anymore, and that there were advanced materials and methods of sail manufacturing available that are suitable for cruising boats and which simply didn't exist at all just 10yrs ago.

Damn, you mean boats built since 2000? Well, that leaves me, and most people here, out. As the recent survey thread shows, the vast, vast majority of boats here are more than 30 years old, with nearly 1/2 being 40+ years. Only about 20% of respondents say they own boats built in this century.

BTW, I'm not taking this to be a serious or heavy discussion 😀.
I don't see how the OP's questions left anyone out. This is a thread about what boats being made today you like, regardless of being able to buy them or even want them. The part implying not being able to afford them is about the most inclusive thing written on Sailnet...

Mark
 

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Hello,

I like this topic. It's a great way to learn from fellow sailors and not from a magazine review where every boat is the 'best ever'. It's also winter, my boat is stored, I can't sail, so this keeps me focusing on sailing and sail boats.

If you want to read about 'interesting boats' there is a great blog here

The owner, Paulo, used to be a frequent contributor here. I don't know why he stopped.

Barry
I forgot about that site. It is basically this thread, and was always a good read. Changed my mind about a lot of this stuff.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Here's my current fantasy boat. Unfortunately I've never sailed one, so big caveat, but I sat on it for at least 30 minutes at two different boat shows and had to be pried off the boat each time. I just love the way everything leads to the helm, and the guests are out of the way in a spacious layout. Not a retirement boat, but if Jeff Bezos decided to buy me a boat right now, this is the one I might ask for.

 

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My favorite "modern" design that I would buy in a heartbeat if I had the cash: the Seaward 32RK. Traditional looks above the waterline, retractable bulb keel below for performance and flexibility. I used to go to boat shows just to see it in person and wander its decks and cabin, and to daydream.

I was going to include a link to the boat on the manufacturer's website, but....

A few years ago, Hake Yachts, the maker of Seaward Yachts, and IP decided to join forces and build IP yachts at the Hake factory to cut costs for both. Apparently, that wasn't enough to save IP, and the company looked like it was about to go bust. But Hake bought Island Packet Yachts when IP was circling the drain, and the new combined company continued to build both kinds of boats at the Hake facility. Soon after that, an IP dealer bought the whole kit and kaboodle from Hake. For awhile, the company was maintaining two separate websites, one for IP and one for Seaward. But when I went to get the Seaward 32RK link just now, I was redirected to the IP site. There doesn't seem to be a Seaward Yachts website anymore, nor is there any mention of them on the IP site. Can it be that IPY has decided to shelve the Seawards?
 

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I don't see how the OP's questions left anyone out. This is a thread about what boats being made today you like, regardless of being able to buy them or even want them. The part implying not being able to afford them is about the most inclusive thing written on Sailnet...
I think you missed the part where I said I wasn't taking this discussion all that seriously ;).

But I was also pointing out to the fellow (was that you?) who was complaining about all the discussion of older designs, that it makes sense given the apparent fleet makeup. We are a bunch of people with generally older boats. So as a group, we probably don't know all that much about newer designs.
 

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Hello,

I like this topic. It's a great way to learn from fellow sailors and not from a magazine review where every boat is the 'best ever'. It's also winter, my boat is stored, I can't sail, so this keeps me focusing on sailing and sail boats.

If you want to read about 'interesting boats' there is a great blog here

The owner, Paulo, used to be a frequent contributor here. I don't know why he stopped.

Barry
I would be interested in reading a detailed review with pics of ANY boat... modern or from the 20th century. And the review to interest me should explain WHY the author finds the feature good or bad,, maybe comparing it to previous "art". I am interested in comfort and livability and less so... "performance" without a lot of work. How much faster does one need to go? Aren't boat speeds constrained by LWL. Of course there are performance differences and if there is a benchmark that would be of interest.
I don't race... I never will... I local cruise and live aboard. That is my filter.

While I can't sail in winter... I still have to deal with boat stuff... and I can always watch the well produced videos now available,
 

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Yes - this was intended to be a light-hearted topic!

I'm trying to distract myself <gestures at everything> by dreaming about my retirement boat and where I will sail her. But retirement is 10-15 years away, and it occurs to me I know almost nothing about the boats being built today. So I just thought I'd see what other sailors thought about the current generation of boat builders, and see if there were any builders I'm currently unfamiliar with that I should keep my eye on.

I'm already learning things - I'd never even heard of Pogo before.
I know an old guy.....he told me one day at work that he was going to look at new cars this weekend. I said, wow Charlie, you going to buy a new car. He said, Heavens no I just going to see what I may be interested in in 10 or 15 years.
 

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Assuming we are allowed to throw a few ideas out there without being judged....If we are talking about modern design then I would plump for the current Hugo Boss (actually I would take the old one as well) - currently leading the Vendee Globe..🙂

We tested a lot of boats about 4 years ago and so have some favorites. Of course, my absolute love is the Alubat Cigale - voted with my wallet after all. But for my type of sailing, I also like the García Expedition or the new Alubat Ovni or Allures.

Among GRPs, X yachts sail really well and the same with the Dehlers. The new Southerly is an excellent boat and, as an ugly boat but great for coastal cruising, the Moody DS45 is a valid choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
I know an old guy.....he told me one day at work that he was going to look at new cars this weekend. I said, wow Charlie, you going to buy a new car. He said, Heavens no I just going to see what I may be interested in in 10 or 15 years.
:LOL:

It's true I have the (boat) seven year itch. But I've decided to invest in some upgrades on my current boat instead. Fortunately a new boat is much more expensive than a new car, and much harder to impulse buy.
 

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My favorite "modern" design that I would buy in a heartbeat if I had the cash: the Seaward 32RK.
I have met other people that like that boat but for the life of me I can't see why. I find it to be absolutely Hideous. Definitely different strokes for different folks. I like the more modern open transom, twin wheel, wide beam carried well aft, hard chine boats. I doubt that one of those is in my future but I could see myself buying a new Astus trimaran.
 
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