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· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What boat and why for family of 4 to do a circumnavigation on a moderate budget?

I am leaving the question somewhat ambiguous as in part my curiosity is philosophical as well as pragmatic.

I know there are several boats that could and have done it. I have read the 'Bluewater' lists and gone a round or two in a few of the threads but what I am trying to figure out is what is the best fit for us.

We currently sail a Martzcraft/Roberts 35. It could do it.

While we have cruised thousands of miles mostly coastal and like alot about her however for world sailing we are starting to consider whether she is perhaps not right for a trip around the globe. She is perhaps a tad small, as racers in a former life we also have to confess that she is not quick.

We would still prefer to go as small and simple as possible, but what is small, simple yet comfortable for living aboard for 3-5 years with school aged children?

Our plan is a'standard' circumnavigation but with the current Gulf of Aden situation it would most likely be via the Cape of Good Hope.

For the sake of a guide let's say 40 - 55ft.

Budget is very variable. In reality we will spend what we have to get the right boat. Say loosely 150k-400k.

Boats we have considered

Peterson 44/46
Stevens 47
Amel Super Maramu
Bristol 45.5
Hallberg Rassy 42/46
Brewer 42
Saga 43
Montecarlo 43

All advise and thoughts welcome.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Scott. Across the Tasman does not worry me, if anything it gives us better angles on the Pacific islands.

Is this the same boat as the Morgan Out Island?? If so is there some concerns about build quality on these?

I ask as I do not know. Otherwise, it would look to be a slightly larger version of our current boat, which is perhaps where we are heading. Maybe not great sailing performance either?
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Look at the Frers HRs - they are much quicker, higher pointing boats than the Enderlein boats: 40, 43, 48.
Thanks.

I had heard that and so we have been restricting our search to 90s/early 2000s (by reason of budget) Frers models.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks all,

Yes our size and budget range is unhelpfully broad at the moment!
Always been told go in the smallest boat you can, but after realizing the Roberts isn't right, I am trying to be realistic about it.

I really like the Amels, they are at the top of size/money scale however and we would be looking at 10+ year old models. They seem to complex boats with maybe more bells and whistles than we need? I worry about time spent in port trying to source parts and keep up with maintenance.

Not necessarily after a speed machine, just acknowledging that after buying a heavier boat we have been frustrated at times with slow passage times.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Certainly when you start looking at Amels and HRs the prices are definitely up there. I guess you could always go for a Little Harbor if you want a more expensive version of a Bristol.
That's the rub. It's a big chunk of our budget gone on either an Amel or a HR.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
We have I guess never been cat people, which in of itself is probably a silly reason to not at least consider them.

It is hard to ignore the liveability of Cats particularly for a family and the Antares are really an amazing boat, albeit more expensive than even an Amel and well out of budget.

As for Aluminum I do like the Ovni's that I have seen down here. They are still quite rare here however.

Besides I am trying to narrow our search not widen it!!!! :) :)

We have also considered the possibility of purchasing and then starting our trip somewhere other than Oz. Purchasing a HR or Amel in Europe and bringing it back this direction make some sense, particularly given that it is difficult to include the Med in a circumnavigation starting from Australia in any case.

Weighed against this option is the potential hassle of getting to know and preparing a boat in a foreign port.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
What boat and why for family of 4 to do a circumnavigation on a moderate budget?

I am leaving the question somewhat ambiguous as in part my curiosity is philosophical as well as pragmatic.

I know there are several boats that could and have done it. I have read the 'Bluewater' lists and gone a round or two in a few of the threads but what I am trying to figure out is what is the best fit for us.

We currently sail a Martzcraft/Roberts 35. It could do it.

While we have cruised thousands of miles mostly coastal and like alot about her however for world sailing we are starting to consider whether she is perhaps not right for a trip around the globe. She is perhaps a tad small, as racers in a former life we also have to confess that she is not quick.

We would still prefer to go as small and simple as possible, but what is small, simple yet comfortable for living aboard for 3-5 years with school aged children?

Our plan is a'standard' circumnavigation but with the current Gulf of Aden situation it would most likely be via the Cape of Good Hope.

For the sake of a guide let's say 40 - 55ft.

Budget is very variable. In reality we will spend what we have to get the right boat. Say loosely 150k-400k.

Boats we have considered

Peterson 44/46
Stevens 47
Amel Super Maramu
Bristol 45.5
Hallberg Rassy 42/46
Brewer 42
Saga 43
Montecarlo 43

All advise and thoughts welcome.
Thanks to all who offered some great advice here.

To give a bit of an update, shortly after starting this thread we came very close to buying a Hallberg-Rassy 45 in the other hemisphere.

In the end it turned out to be a boat with too many issues and a vendor too unwilling to budge on price. As we were not desperate to buy we walked away.

We did a bit of sailing, had a baby and took a year off from boat shopping. Now we are back and a tad more focused.

My first questions is does anyone have any experience or advice on a Moody 425?

The liveability looks good for us, they look to sail reasonably and have good build quality.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
The 425 is essentially the same as the 422 but with a bit extra on the sugar scoop.

90 galls water which is insufficient unless you have a reliable watermaker.

In mast furling was standard. [ Hate the the things. ]

Ensuite heads for the aft cabin which might suit you.
I had thought the water tankage a bit limited, one of the boats I am considering in Panama has had additional tankage fitted and the In Mast furling removed in favour of lazy jacks.

Thoughts on build quality and sailing characteristics?

They seem to be on large far more reasonably priced than similar sized and aged Hallberg Rassy's and Najads.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
That's your answer (and you already know it). It sounds like you have great reasons for a bit larger boat to facilitate the cruise in comfort -- just don't let that turn into a luxury which takes away from (or puts an end to) the cruise. There ought to be plenty of boats at or under 100K that fill most of your needs. Tayana 42, KP44, Caliber 40, Bristol 45.5 or even 41.1. Sounds like a fun search to me -- just stay off the one's you can afford!
Pretty much!

Figuring out how much money we actually have snd then how much money we need for a midlife extended( 5 years) cruise while still having some in reserve is the equation we have to figure out.

All the boats you mentioned are on our shortlist other than the Caliber 40 as I must admit I do not know much about them.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #43 · (Edited)
What about Bob's Nordic 44? Maybe the upper end of the price range on that short list, but shouldn't be more than a 45.5.
There is a Nordic 40 for sale here about 1/2 mile from my mooring which is rare.Not too many of them around here.

My concern is that long term cruising it might still be too small a boat for us.
 

· Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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Discussion Starter · #46 · (Edited)
Not shure what you budget is, but I like the Deerfoot, a few now on yacht world, a nice 50 footer in the mid 200's.
I will have a look.

I have always liked the Deerfoot's, the Dashew's are amongst my early cruising/sailing heros. I fear though they might sit outside my budget.
 
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