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Not weird at all and is an advanced technique commonly used by SCOW and sportboat racers and others who race relatively flat bottomed or tunnel hulled centerboard boats.

Notice that the leech of the mainsail is 'well closed' by pulling LOTS of strain on the mainsheet. This causes the leech (especially on boats with large 'roach areas') to become quite rounded up towards the weather side and which causes the 'overall amount' of draft to radically increase, .... causes the boat to radically heel over and in doing so causes a vast reduction of hull wetted surface area. With less hull drag, the boat speed increases and the ability to point may increase by 10-15 degrees (because of the radical change in 'angle of attack' in the mainsail due to that 'closed up' leech shape) .... momentarily for many seconds.

In light winds on the big ILYA Scows etc., you can earlier begin to 'plane to windward'; on a keel boat you can commence to 'turbo sail' (constantly and slowly varying between a 'high' beat and a 'foot off') & which will ultimately leave your straight line sailing competitor well to leeward ... your keel better 'flys (lifts) to windward' when at the induced artificial 'higher' apparent wind (both angle and velocity).
Ditto too when racing and you near the end of a leg before a tack ... and forcibly pointing higher (power pinching) is inconsequential to VMG; but, you gain considerable 'boat lengths' on the 'next' leg because youre 'power pinching' up. I used to do this routinely on the last 5% of every beating leg ... even on a keelboat. Sailboat racing is a game of 'inches gained' and such will gobble up MANY inches when done correctly; but it takes a LOT of practice to get it right.

This 'technique' is derived from the aero theory of airflow 'recirculating around a sail(s)', and by doing so transiently causes the (vector component of) FORWARD FLOW of air on the windward side of a sail to cause MORE 'upwash' in front of the boat/jib .... something akin to roll-tacking but without any turning.

"Turbo sailing": Footing Off - SailboatOwners.com ... see POST #12

;-)
 

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Well, he certainly isn't seeing much of where he's headed, that's for sure :)

Might be intentionally oversheeted to induce a greater heeling angle, simply to show off more of the cockpit for the pic?

You're right, however, a number of things - particularly the jib - don't look right to my eye, either... I think some Photoshop work might have been done, certain aspects even have more of the look of a CAD rendering, to me...

That jib is especially bizarre... Why on earth would anyone attach the entire foot of a headsail to a jib boom like that, that has to be one of the dumbest things I've ever seen...
 

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I wouldn't over-analyse one shot of a boat sailing.

"On her ear", isn't that what it's called? I think that is a Watch Hill 15 built at Artisan Boatworks in Rockport Maine, and it looks like the builder, Alex, is at the helm sailing(see his work boots?).

I think one of their sales tools for this boat is how easy it is to sail. I've seen them sail, it's true. Artisans boats are even more beautiful in reality than photos.

Someone is taking gratuitous sailing shots that show the boat well heeled. You can see the deck colors, bottom paint, cockpit details, for their sales brochure.

Google Watch Hill 15 and you can find plenty of shots of it flat on the water.

 

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Other than the lack of fenders to prevent that nice finish from chafing?
 

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Also, keep in mind that the WH15 is not a terribly heavy boat, and the only movable ballast in that pic is Alec, who is sitting on the low side. I'd bet that if he was on the high side, the boat would be much more flat in the water.

To the poster who calls the club-footed jib the 'dumbest thing he's ever seen', I'm not sure of your qualifications, but I think this is a Nat Herreshoff design, is it not? They don't call him the Wizard of Bristol because he's a dummy....
 

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grumpy old man
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Both sails look a bit overtrimmed but other than that he looks like he is enjoying himself. Having the jib on a club limits your sheeting options. Bad idea. And I don't give a rat's patootey if LFH did like jibs on clubs. They don't work worth a damn.

PFD? On a day like that?
Weenie.
 

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To the poster who calls the club-footed jib the 'dumbest thing he's ever seen', I'm not sure of your qualifications, but I think this is a Nat Herreshoff design, is it not? They don't call him the Wizard of Bristol because he's a dummy....
Well, my 'qualifications' are quite minimal, I can assure you... :)

Of course, I'm somewhat familiar with club-footed jibs, and have sailed boats with a Hoyt jib boom that seemed to be a pretty good arrangement, and that allowed a fair amount of ability to adjust sail shape. I just don't recall seeing a club-foot that wasn't loose-footed, instead of the foot being fixed along a track on the jib boom... Well, maybe I have, but certainly not in this century, and not on any sort of contemporary boat...

Obviously, if Nat H designed it that way, then fine, the boat is being faithful to the original design... But it certainly isn't affording a fast or efficient sail shape, especially when one starts falling off the breeze...
 

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Both sails look a bit overtrimmed but other than that he looks like he is enjoying himself. Having the jib on a club limits your sheeting options. Bad idea. And I don't give a rat's patootey if LFH did like jibs on clubs. They don't work worth a damn.

PFD? On a day like that?
Weenie.
No doubt, Bob. But Artisan isn't trying to re-invent old designs like this. Their skill is bringing some of the building aspects up to date without re-inventing the design.

As you know, boats like these Watch Hill 15'a are based on hundred year old one design class boats, many of which are racing today. Sure, there's faster boats today but this is still a good boat and fun to sail.

And if they're all the same, and everybody has got a club boom(they work well enough), you've got a heck of race!

 

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Discussion Starter #17
No doubt, Bob. But Artisan isn't trying to re-invent old designs like this. Their skill is bringing some of the building aspects up to date without re-inventing the design.

As you know, boats like these Watch Hill 15'a are based on hundred year old one design class boats, many of which are racing today. Sure, there's faster boats today but this is still a good boat and fun to sail.

And if they're all the same, and everybody has got a club boom(they work well enough), you've got a heck of race!

What do you guys mean by "Club" booms?
 

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I agree totally. And, I'd love to race in that class. How can you not admire that boat? Just don't try to tell me that is at good as it gets in terms of design efficiency because that would be silly.

I have raced El Toros. I understand the fun of racing silly boats one design.

Chef:
Look closely. On the foot of the jib there is a spar. The jib is laced to this spar. This spar is called a "club". In the old days it was a way of doing things. Over time we learned that it was not efficient. It's convenient but it's not fast. If it were you would se it used today. There is a learning curve. For some of us.

But I love old, traditional boats. I'd be very happy racing that boat. Very happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I agree totally. And, I'd love to race in that class. How can you not admire that boat? Just don't try to tell me that is at good as it gets in terms of design efficiency because that would be silly.

I have raced El Toros. I understand the fun of racing silly boats one design.

Chef:
Look closely. On the foot of the jib there is a spar. The jib is laced to this spar. This spar is called a "club". In the old days it was a way of doing things. Over time we learned that it was not efficient. It's convenient but it's not fast. If it were you would se it used today. There is a learning curve. For some of us.

But I love old, traditional boats. I'd be very happy racing that boat. Very happy.
oh okay,Thank you ... a clubbed jib would bang against my Lightnings' mast, right?
And if a loose foot is best, thats why we have adjustable outhauls?
 

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Also why you have two sheeting positions for your loose footed jib on a Lightning, Chef. Loose footed = better sail shape, or so it seems.
 
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